The Stainless Steel Rat Returns (Stainless Steel Rat Series #11) [NOOK Book]

Overview


After a ten-year absence, the return of one of the most enduring series characters in modern SF

James Bolivar "Slippery Jim" DiGriz, Special Corps agent, master con man, interstellar criminal (retired), is living high on the hog on the planet of Moolaplenty when a long-lost cousin and a shipful of swine arrive to drain his bank account and send him and his lovely wife, ...

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The Stainless Steel Rat Returns (Stainless Steel Rat Series #11)

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Overview


After a ten-year absence, the return of one of the most enduring series characters in modern SF

James Bolivar "Slippery Jim" DiGriz, Special Corps agent, master con man, interstellar criminal (retired), is living high on the hog on the planet of Moolaplenty when a long-lost cousin and a shipful of swine arrive to drain his bank account and send him and his lovely wife, Angelina, wandering the stars on the wildest journey since Gulliver's Travels.

In this darkly satiric work, Harry Harrison bring his most famous character out of retirement for a grand tour of the galaxy. The Stainless Steel Rat rides again: a cocktail in his hand, a smile on his lips, and larceny in his heart, in search of adventure, gravitons, and a way to get rid of the pigs.


At the publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management software (DRM) applied.


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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Harrison returns to his long-running interstellar adventure series for the first time since 1999's The Stainless Steel Rat Joins the Circus. Slippery Jim DiGriz, a thief and con artist, is enjoying a comfortable 35th-century life when his hick relatives show up, farm animals in tow, looking for a handout. Jim and his beloved wife, Angelina, are soon careening around to various backwater worlds where Jim hopes to ditch the unwanted kinfolk. The series' 1960s origins are most painfully obvious in the descriptions of a planet where the green-skinned, shiftless, slow-witted majority oppresses the smarter, slower-breeding, pink-skinned minority. Shocked not by the race wars but by the existence of races at all, Jim (himself quite pink) declares that the different skin colors "should have been bred out centuries ago." Modern readers are unlikely to find this tale appealing in any way. (Aug.)
From the Publisher
“The Rat can hold his head high amongst the most elevated superhero company—Bulldog Drummond, James Bond, and Flash Gordon included.” —Times Literary Supplement

“Cheerfully larcenous and anarchic. Long may the Rat run roughshod over the forces of law, order, and the square world.” —Orlando Sentinel on The Stainless Steel Rat Joins the Circus

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781429963350
  • Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
  • Publication date: 8/3/2010
  • Series: Stainless Steel Rat Series , #11
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 212,845
  • File size: 304 KB

Meet the Author


HARRY HARRISON, Nebula–winning author of innumerable science fiction novels and stories, divides his time between Ireland and California.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 9 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(6)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

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1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 12, 2010

    Lives up to the author's standard as a scifi grand master!

    I'm going to spend this comment taking apart the idiot and dullard of a book reviewer at Publisher's Weekly who tried unfairly to paint Harrison as a racist in his public review.
    As he hasn't read the series, or Harrison's background from WWII where he worked with black soldiers as a Sgt. while their white jackass Officers were always giving them crap and trying to get them written up or jailed. Harrison wrote an article years ago about his experience of this, and the desegregation of the military and his anti-prejudice feelings.

    The Reviewer quotes the one sentence where jim remarks:
    > Jim (himself quite pink) declares that the different skin colors "should
    > have been bred out centuries ago."
    Firstly Jim is not pink. His race is never mentioned in the previous books, though he is generally portrayed as a white guy by artists on some covers and the comic book by creative license alone. Harrison (and he has said this before himself) always tried to keep race specifically vague for the main characters in his Rat books so that any reader identifies with Slippery Jim.
    Jim mentioned here that racial differences on the same planet and same continent were odd BECAUSE in his world (this series) humans had colonized the galaxy thousands of years ago. With an end to racial bigotry in THEIR modern social culture anyone would naturally be likely to marry anyone else regardless of race, so after thousands of years everyone is just a standard light brown color- why this color? It was predicted by scientists back in the 80s that that was what people would look like if all the races mixed out of existence. The result would be sort of brown with slightly asian eyes. Harrison went with this hypothesis in his series. He WASN'T saying that Jim is this color so it is the best some how.

    The reviewer also writes:
    > the green-skinned, shiftless, slow-witted majority oppresses the
    > smarter, slower-breeding, pink-skinned minority
    I didn't see the greens being any more shiftless than the LIGHT BROWN ones, or any more slow witted than the shipwrecked normal humans who were also savage, unlettered bumpkins. Again its like the reviewer is trying here to compare this story to black-white prejudice and accuse Harrison of being a race bigot.

    Harrison also invented a species of grey human that were smarter than normal and psychic, in a previous book of the series. They tried to take over the galaxy and Jim and the bureau he worked for back then stopped them.
    The greens, being a mutated species had an unhuman hive like caste system where the majority were like drones and didn't need to be smart. The minority in the greens were bred to lead by their own culture and so had higher intelligence. This had nothing to do with the unchanged shunned humans who lived separately. There was no use of comparison.

    When Jim landed, the smart leader greens colored themselves different "pure bred" human colors they remembered from the past to be most pleasing to who ever they might be talking to.
    The remaining normal humans there interbred over the centuries giving the "nice healthy brown" that would be normal to his universe, again Harrison was not praising color here, just stating fact. This was the normal way people looked, unless they were from an isolated colony, but they would still be all the same color in the colony because of hundreds of years of interbreeding there. I guess the word skin color jus

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 4, 2012

    very good read, Harrisonn and SS Rat fans will enjoy it

    I will make this short. The reviewer for Publishers Weekly that throws Harry Harrison under the racist bus with his review is mistaken and does himself and Publishers Weekly a dissrevice with his ignorant review. If he has any class he will retract it.
    This book is a great read and typical slippery Jim Degriz.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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