BN.com Gift Guide

Stand Up [DualDisc]

( 7 )

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
With a string of live recordings since 2001's controversial Everyday, the Dave Matthews Band has been grooving in something close to autopilot, more intent on pleasing fans than in stretching out. That M.O. changes significantly on Stand Up, one of the band's most adventurous efforts, and certainly among the most varied studio sets of their career. For starters, Matthews pumps up the energy level surprisingly often, as on the title track, which uses a martial drumbeat to anchor a bottom end that doesn't politely suggest that folks shake their groove thang but rather forces them onto the dance floor. That's underscored by the agreeably gritty playing of saxophonist ...
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
With a string of live recordings since 2001's controversial Everyday, the Dave Matthews Band has been grooving in something close to autopilot, more intent on pleasing fans than in stretching out. That M.O. changes significantly on Stand Up, one of the band's most adventurous efforts, and certainly among the most varied studio sets of their career. For starters, Matthews pumps up the energy level surprisingly often, as on the title track, which uses a martial drumbeat to anchor a bottom end that doesn't politely suggest that folks shake their groove thang but rather forces them onto the dance floor. That's underscored by the agreeably gritty playing of saxophonist Leroi Moore, who also struts his stuff on the hip-hop-tinged "Stolen Away at 55th and 3rd." Some credit must go to producer Mark Batson, who helmed India.Arie's breakthrough, Acoustic Soul, as well as tracks for Eminem, Beyoncé, Seal, and Sting. But Matthews retains his unique style, making better use of world music elements here than he has in some time, notably on the sensual "Dreamgirl," which employs eerily echoing backing vocals dripping with aboriginal flavor. That song is one of several that let the singer get his mojo working and provide good counterpoint to topical tunes such as the sprawling "American Baby," a life-during-wartime allegory that's preceded by the separate "American Baby" intro, a mélange of mournful piano and sampled gunfire. There's a similar urgency in "Everybody Wake Up Our Finest Hour Arrives," a song that also boasts a fascinating and somewhat jarring arrangement drawing as much on modern classical music as on anything from the rock idiom. The vibe of Stand Up is slightly different than the average DMB album, but for those who value a thrill ride as much as a cruise, it's definitely worth buckling up for.
All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
The Dave Matthews Band decided to team up with a very different producer for Stand Up -- Mark Batson, who earned his reputation with modern R&B and hip-hop records by the likes of India Arie, Joe, Beyoncé, and Seal. This doesn't result in an extreme makeover but instead puts a gentle gloss on the band's sound that renders it sleek and muted. Batson produces the DMB as he would any other record -- by keeping the mixes relatively spare and open, cutting up the rhythms in the computer, and polishing it all so it glistens. It's much warmer than Glen Ballard's makeover on 2001's Everyday, even if some of the cuts here appear to be pieced together in the studio. Matthews pulls away from the introspection of both Busted Stuff and Some Devil, occasionally reviving the humor that spiked his earlier work. The resulting album may not be to everybody's taste -- some fans will surely miss the loose jams that characterized DMB's '90s work -- but it is an intriguing change of pace for the group.
Rolling Stone - Christian Hoard
1/2 Stand Up is the sound of a veteran outfit navigating between jammy mojo and pop-wise charm.

1/2 Stand Up is the sound of a veteran outfit navigating between jammy mojo and pop-wise charm.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 5/10/2005
  • Label: Rca
  • UPC: 828766928822
  • Catalog Number: 69288
  • Sales rank: 197,978

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Dreamgirl - Dave Matthews (4:01)
  2. 2 Old Dirt Hill (Bring That Beat Back) - Dave Matthews (5:00)
  3. 3 Stand Up (For It) - Dave Matthews (4:13)
  4. 4 American Baby Intro - Dave Matthews (2:03)
  5. 5 American Baby - Dave Matthews (4:35)
  6. 6 Smooth Rider - Dave Matthews (2:17)
  7. 7 Everybody Wake Up (Our Finest Hour Arrives) - Dave Matthews (4:17)
  8. 8 Out of My Hands - Dave Matthews (3:41)
  9. 9 Hello Again - Dave Matthews (3:56)
  10. 10 Louisiana Bayou - Dave Matthews (5:36)
  11. 11 Stolen Away on 55th & 3rd - Dave Matthews (4:17)
  12. 12 You Might Die Trying - Dave Matthews (4:44)
  13. 13 Steady as We Go - Dave Matthews (3:24)
  14. 14 Hunger for the Great Light - Dave Matthews (4:20)
Disc 2
  1. 1 Dreamgirl - Dave Matthews
  2. 2 Old Dirt Hill (Bring That Beat Back) - Dave Matthews
  3. 3 Stand Up (For It) - Dave Matthews
  4. 4 American Baby Intro - Dave Matthews
  5. 5 American Baby - Dave Matthews
  6. 6 Smooth Rider - Dave Matthews
  7. 7 Everybody Wake Up (Our Finest Hour Arrives) - Dave Matthews
  8. 8 Out of My Hands - Dave Matthews
  9. 9 Hello Again - Dave Matthews
  10. 10 Louisiana Bayou - Dave Matthews
  11. 11 Stolen Away on 55th & 3rd - Dave Matthews
  12. 12 You Might Die Trying - Dave Matthews
  13. 13 Steady as We Go - Dave Matthews
  14. 14 Hunger for the Great Light - Dave Matthews
  15. 15 Bonus Content - Dave Matthews
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Dave Matthews Band Primary Artist
Dave Matthews Guitar, Piano, Vocals
Susan Dench Viola
Leo Payne Violin
Audrey Riley Cello
Mark Batson Organ, Synthesizer, Percussion, Piano, Conductor, Keyboards, Vocals, Clavinet, Moog Synthesizer, Mellotron, fender rhodes, Wurlitzer
Carter Beauford Percussion, Drums, Vocals
Stefan Lessard Bass, Guitar, Vocals
LeRoi Moore Baritone Saxophone, Soprano Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Vocals
Boyd Tinsley Mandolin, Violin, Vocals, Electric Violin
Ann Marie Calhoun Violin
David Gee Cello
Lee Grove Percussion
Jennifer Myer Viola
Technical Credits
Dave Matthews Composer, Art Direction
Audrey Riley String Arrangements
Rob Evans Engineer
Mark Batson Composer, Producer, Engineer, String Arrangements
Stefan Lessard Art Direction
LeRoi Moore Pyrotechnics
Chris Kress Engineer
Thane Kerner Art Direction
Aaron Fessel Engineer
Lee Grove Programming
Wyndsor Taggart Hug Art Direction
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 7 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(2)

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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Worse than the "Everday" debacle

    This effort is worse than DMB's "Everday" album. Both "Standup" and "Everday" are more about the albums' producers (Ballard & Batson) than DMB. The only song that even marginally harkens back to DMB's glory days is track 4, which is a short instrumental diddy. As a true DMB fan, to say this album is a disappointment is a huge understatement.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Not the Best, But Still A Great Album

    This may not be the best album DMB has put out, but it still pretty good. I was looking very much forward to receiving the CD and it was worth the wait.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Disappointing

    I was so excited for the new DMB studio album. After listening to it I am horribly let down. In comparison to all of their other music it is wretched. I am sure it will be full of great pop radio hits yet for a true fan it is one disappointment after another. Especially bad is the title track "Stand Up" whose intro begins with great potential- then they start chanting the title and it goes downhill from there. This album is a waste of great talent.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A very disappointed DMB fan

    I have been a loyal DMB fan for years. Unfortunately, looking forward to a new CD I preordered Stand Up. This CD is packed with redundant lyrics. The songs are boring and the music is not up to DMB's standards. Batson has influenced this CD way too much and the originality and musicality of the band is squelched. This effort has no interesting jams and Carter's talents are wasted on run-of-the-mill beats that any drummer could do. Out of 14 tracks only 3 or 4 of them are not bad. Bring back the truly special music and lyrics of Dave Matthews and the band and get rid of Batson! Bring back Lillywhite. In summary, Don't bother buying this one.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    amazing!

    Shoot me for saying but I love this album!! The tracks are unique and interestingly arranged in true DMB style. From the opening track you know this is going to be a sound like no other and thats what makes DMB great!! I can't stop listening to this cd and if you're a fan of DMB, then you know their real appeal comes when you see them live. I can say that this music will make for one HELL of a live show. As usual.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Wait till they tour baby

    I am a long-time DMB fan, and I will agree with everyone when it's said that their old studio albums are better than this one. But one thing that everyone should keep in mind, and probably one of the biggest reasons we are all fans of DMB, is because when they play their songs live, they are always changing and growing from their original studio versions. For example, look at the studio versions of Rhyme and Reason and Jimi Thing, both with electric guitar solos (obviously neither of which have them now). There's also Warehouse with Dave's rapidly-strummed intro rather than the Stop-Time Intro we are all so used to (and many other songs with intros and outros). Also Two Step, Dancing Nancies, Lie In Our Graves, #41, Jimi Thing, and so many others which now have extended jams live, but did not have them on the studio versions. My point is that, if you forget you've ever heard a live DMB song and just listen to the studio versions, you will begin to notice how different those versions are, how much they've changed, and how some songs even come off weird (like the cowbell in the original Warehouse!). Keep that in mind when listening to Stand Up, as these songs will surely change as well, and get their own intros, jams, Dave scats and all the DMB goodness we are accustomed to. Like I said, wait till they tour baby.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews