Standard Cataloging for School and Public Libraries

Standard Cataloging for School and Public Libraries

by Sheila S. Intner, Jean Weihs
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

In the four years since the last edition came out, there have been new editions of nearly every cataloguing rule and tool to which it refers: the Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules, Library of Congress Subject Headings, Sears List of Subject Headings, and Dewey Decimal Classification, to name a few. As only they can, Sheila Intner and Jean Weihs lead the wary and unwary… See more details below

Overview

In the four years since the last edition came out, there have been new editions of nearly every cataloguing rule and tool to which it refers: the Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules, Library of Congress Subject Headings, Sears List of Subject Headings, and Dewey Decimal Classification, to name a few. As only they can, Sheila Intner and Jean Weihs lead the wary and unwary alike to apply them with competence if not aplomb. Through hundreds of examples, they illustrate cataloging problems and their solutions. They also describe and explain a variety of management decisions, the pros and cons of cataloging alternatives, and the rudiments of how to run a catalog department. They have even included a new chapter on metadata, as well as enlarged sections of practical advice on how to deal with changed subject headings and classification numbers.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
A new edition of the introductory text reviewing the standard practices of cataloging, classification, and indexing used in the US and Canada. These standards are covered in four part sections detailing rules used for descriptive cataloging, subject heading lists, classifications, and computer entry and communication protocols. The revisions to the new edition incorporate cataloging rule changes, MARC format integration changes, and include a section on catalog department management. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
From the Publisher

"This handy book is indispensable for anyone new to the field for learning classification and cataloging practice in the dynamically-changing library and information environment. And no doubt it is equally useful for veteran cataloguers and teachers of the subject." - Knowledge Organization
VOYA, April 2015 (Vol. 38, No. 1) - Liz Sundermann
This relatively slender volume manages to cover all of the basics of library cataloging while remaining quite readable. The larger pages allow for a larger than average font and plenty of margin space upon which to rest one’s gaze or add class notes. The prose itself is spare and informative, almost conversational at times, and holds the reader’s interest even through complex subject matter. The brief narrative accounts of such subjects as catalogers’ evolving challenges and brief biographies of eminent historical catalogers are refreshing breaks that keep the learner fresh and engaged. Sample figures for a variety of formats are photocopied directly from their sources, which lends an air of authenticity to the experience gained by completing the quizzes scattered throughout the book. The book concludes with a chapter describing the job of managing a cataloging department. This is an excellent resource for those who wish to be promoted or who find themselves stepping into an “acting manager” position. It is equally useful to those who will never work in a cataloging department, as it gives them important insight into the roles and expectations of those who do. The book’s fifth edition is up-to-date in every way, from the evolution of RDA and AACR2 to the challenges posed by the widening array of electronic resources. Some cataloging instructors may take issue with the use of some hypothetical examples, but these are used sparingly and only to make specific points. A larger issue is that the figures are often placed awkwardly within the text. There are several instances of figures being inserted in the middle of a paragraph, leading the reader to flip forward and backwards through pages of figures before finding the conclusion to a thought. This is a comprehensive cataloging text book that is usable in degreed programs as well as by the individual. This book is an excellent choice for an introductory cataloging class and for library staff who wish to become familiar with the subject. Reviewer: Liz Sundermann; Ages 11 to Adult.
Library Journal
04/01/2015
This guide, now in its fifth edition, begins by discussing the benefits of a well-cataloged collection and the value of the "big three" access points: creator, title, subject. The text assumes a knowledge of library cataloging vocabulary and cataloging procedures, and access to secondary sources (such as Sears Lists of Subject Headings or AACR2 and RDA manuals) to complete the exercises at the end of each chapter. The layout often seems designed to hinder rather than help readers, with sometimes tiny print, figures difficult to interpret, and other elements oddly placed on the page. Inter and Weihs (coauthors, Metadata and its Impact on Libraries) present dense yet helpful discussions of the advantages and disadvantages of various cataloging systems and the challenges of cataloging information coming at an ever-faster pace and in increasingly diverse formats. Experienced librarians can use the discussions of RDA, MARC, XML, Dublin Core and other recent initiatives to give themselves an introduction to current terminology and thoughts on where cataloging is headed. VERDICT While this work has much worthy information, it is ideal for use in information science classes, when an experienced teacher and class discussion could supplement the text.—Maggie Knapp, Trinity Valley Sch., Fort Worth, TX

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780872877375
Publisher:
Libraries Unlimited
Publication date:
11/28/1990
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
300

What People are saying about this

Barbara Schultz-Jones

"I'm very pleased with the approach of the authors, since school libraries will encounter AACR2 along with RDA in their upcoming cataloging experiences. The examples are excellent!"

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >