Standard Time, Vol. 6: Mr. Jelly Lord

Standard Time, Vol. 6: Mr. Jelly Lord

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by Wynton Marsalis
     
 

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On MR. JELLY LORD, Wynton Marsalis offers a homage to fellow Crescent City native Ferdinand Lamenthe ("Jelly Roll") Morton that does full justice to a choice selection of the seminal jazz composer's incomparable oeuvre. Joined by a select crew of regular cohorts, New Orleans repertoire specialists, and by guest pianists Danilo Perez (an unaccompanied "Mamanita")…  See more details below

Overview

On MR. JELLY LORD, Wynton Marsalis offers a homage to fellow Crescent City native Ferdinand Lamenthe ("Jelly Roll") Morton that does full justice to a choice selection of the seminal jazz composer's incomparable oeuvre. Joined by a select crew of regular cohorts, New Orleans repertoire specialists, and by guest pianists Danilo Perez (an unaccompanied "Mamanita") and Harry Connick, Jr. ("Billy Goat Blues"), Marsalis extracts an ensemble tone that simultaneously addresses Morton's idiomatic essence while interpreting it with a modernist vocabulary.Not least, Mr. Marsalis unleashes his magnificent trumpet more than has been his wont on recent recordings. "King Porter Stomp" is an exquisite mute feature. There's a nuanced open-horn reading of the insinuating theme of "The Pearls," and, on "Dead Man Blues," a soaring Armstrong-esque oration articulated with golden tone and phrased with rhythmic complexity that recalls '60s vocabulary extenders Booker Little and Woody Shaw.The virtuosic solo on the penultimate track, "Black Bottom Stomp," remains pure Wynton Marsalis.The album concludes with a duet between Marsalis and pianist Eric Reed on "Tom Cat Blues"--- recorded by wax cylinder in the Thomas Edison Laboratories where phonographic technology was developed -- that blurs the lines between past and present in the manner Marsalis intends. It's a fitting end to one of his essential recordings.

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Richard S. Ginell
In this tribute to Jelly Roll Morton, at last there is a large sampling of the Wynton Marsalis who can get large crowds at outdoor jazz festivals like the Playboy at Hollywood Bowl to dance and wave white handkerchiefs. This is mostly gutbucket, stomping, swinging New Orleans jazz through the eyes and ears of avid students of old records -- and they have absorbed a good deal of the original raffish, joyous feeling. Dedicated scholars as they are, the band even recreates the original zany dialogue that opens Morton's recordings of "Dead Man Blues" and "Sidewalk Blues" (with a small alteration in the latter for PC purposes), leading to swaggering performances of both. Marsalis by now is an absolute virtuoso of the plunger mute, and he gets ample room to growl and snarl, often alongside trombonist/co-arranger Wycliffe Gordon. Without the mute, he is often majestically commanding, totally in his element. As befitting the contrapuntal New Orleans ethos, Wynton is also generous with the spotlight, turning over an entire track to Danilo Perez's lurching solo piano rendition of "Mamanita," another to the thick-toned period clarinet of performing musicologist Michael White on "Big Lip Blues," and another, alas, to Harry Connick, Jr.'s ham-handed solo treatment of "Billy Goat Stomp." The most startling performance -- authenticity taken to its extreme -- comes at the end as Wynton and pianist Eric Reed wander into Thomas Edison Laboratories (circa 1993) to record a cylinder of "Tom Cat Blues" with vintage acoustical equipment. The results are often hilarious, and certainly instructive (try this out as a blindfold test on friends who think that they don't make jazz records like they used to).

Product Details

Release Date:
01/13/2008
Label:
Sony / Bmg Japan
UPC:
4547366025811
catalogNumber:
1103

Related Subjects

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Wynton Marsalis   Primary Artist,Trumpet
Harry Connick   Piano
Michael White   Clarinet
Danilo Pérez   Piano
Eric Reed   Piano
Herlin Riley   Drums
Reginald Veal   Bass
Wessell Anderson   Alto Saxophone
Lucien Barbarin   Trombone
Victor Goines   Clarinet,Soprano Saxophone,Tenor Saxophone
Wycliffe Gordon   Trombone,Trumpet,Tuba
Don Vappie   Banjo,Guitar
Eric Lewis   Piano

Technical Credits

Todd Whitelock   Engineer
Jen Wyler   Engineer
Charles Luke   Composer
Steven Epstein   Producer
Anita Gonzales   Composer

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Standard Time, Vol. 6: Mr. Jelly Lord 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Jelly Roll Morton was jazz music's first great composer, arranger and very nearly lived up to his claim--that he "invented" jazz. Certainly Morton was one of the first musicians to transform ragtime into jazz and the first to notate the New Orleans polyphony. However, his contributions to the music were very nearly overshadowed by his reputation and slander from critics who should have known better. Even today the jazz "intelligentsia" writes Morton off as a clucking has-been of a pimp who wrote a few interesting tunes. There has been a resurgence in Morton's popularity recently due to several books and critical studies that have set the record straight and done much to repair his reputation. That's why this CD by Marsalis is so important, and may be one of his best. Marsalis treats the music as a living testimony to the greatness of Morton, and his band performs the compositions with joy, roughness and the dirty sense of the gutbucket that Marsalis describes as the "poetic attitude towards the carnal"--which enlivens the best of New Orleans jazz. Morton would have been proud. Five stars.