Standing In for Lincoln Green

Overview


Lincoln Green has a double, someone who looks just like him. Lincoln Green's own mother can't tell the difference between him and You Know Who. With his handy stand-in taking care of all the chores that just can’t wait, Lincoln Green has plenty of time to do the things he wants to do, like drink fizzy sarsparilla and shoot the breeze.
 
But Lincoln Green’s not the only one who doesn’t like doing things they don't like doing. It's not long...
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Overview


Lincoln Green has a double, someone who looks just like him. Lincoln Green's own mother can't tell the difference between him and You Know Who. With his handy stand-in taking care of all the chores that just can’t wait, Lincoln Green has plenty of time to do the things he wants to do, like drink fizzy sarsparilla and shoot the breeze.
 
But Lincoln Green’s not the only one who doesn’t like doing things they don't like doing. It's not long before You Know Who has teamed up with Billy the Kid Next Door, which is a lot more fun than doing things for Lincoln Green, that's for sure. And that's when Lincoln Green finds himself in BIG trouble.
 
From the author of Marshall Armstrong Is New to Our School and The Frank Show comes another visually striking, brilliantly inventive picture book.

Praise for Standing in For Lincoln Green
"Mackintosh uses his fanciful premise to great effect, both as a fun taste of wish fulfillment and as a lesson to all the potential shirkers out there. His art offers distinctive details in the clothes and settings and big-headed, rosy-cheeked warmth in the characters."
Booklist
 
"An imaginative, visually dynamic picture book that playfully touts the advantages—and even pleasures—of just getting things done."
Kirkus Reviews

"Budding sophisticates will relish Mackintosh's irony."
Publishers Weekly

"Mackintosh’s voice is engaging, but it’s the look of his pages that will have readers — and lap listeners — marveling at the variety of perspective, color and composition that make ‘Standing In for Lincoln Green’ such a standout."
The New York Times

"Funny and fun, this paean to play–and work–will have readers cheering for both Lincoln and You Know Who."
School Library Journal

 

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  • Standing In for Lincoln Green
    Standing In for Lincoln Green  

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times Book Review - Sarah Harrison Smith
Mackintosh's voice is engaging, but it's the look of his pages that will have readers…marveling at the variety of perspective, color and composition that make Standing In for Lincoln Green such a standout.
Publishers Weekly
08/26/2013
Mackintosh (The Frank Show) imagines an autocrat in a 10-gallon hat named Lincoln Green whose obliging double, a boy named You Know Who who lives in the mirror, does all his chores for him, freeing Lincoln to "grab some shuteye, listen to Sagebrush and Dawgies on the radio, and mosey over to Brian and Kenny's place to shoot the breeze." Lincoln Green uses You Know Who shamelessly, sending him off to practice music, mow the lawn, and even sit in the dentist's chair for him. An invitation to form a club with the boy next door wrecks the scheme, as You Know Who discovers that he doesn't have to do what Lincoln Green says. The result: "big trouble. It seems Lincoln Green has done nothing his mom has asked. And it's all because of You Know You." Mackintosh's wonderfully loopy line wanders over the pages, stopping to dwell on items of mechanical interest—toy trains, the dentist's chair, the detritus in Billy's treehouse. Though this complex patchwork of fantasy, fake nostalgia, and fable may baffle more literal-minded children, budding sophisticates will relish Mackintosh's irony. Ages 4–8. (Aug.)
School Library Journal
11/01/2013
PreS-Gr 2—Childhood chores are, well, a chore. Clever Lincoln Green has found a solution to bypass them forever. His mirror image, You Know Who, does all his tasks and assignments, permitting Lincoln to while away the hours doing exactly as he pleases. This cushy setup works well until a new neighbor befriends his industrious doppelgänger and You Know Who discovers the joy of playing. Of course, this results in Lincoln Green missing field trips, having late homework, and getting into trouble with Mom. In a pique of anger, he decides to do chores himself and finds that they have their own reward. The sprightly and slightly quirky plot perfectly mirrors the sketchy illustrations that show the joys of imaginative play. Sharp-eyed readers will notice Lincoln sports a sweater with his initial, which flips backward when his double is featured. Funny and fun, this paean to play-and work-will have readers cheering for both Lincoln and You Know Who.—Marge Loch-Wouters, La Crosse Public Library, WI
Kirkus Reviews
2013-09-15
Who wouldn't want a "handy stand-in" to take over life's most tedious tasks? Lincoln Green, part-time cowboy, calls his mirror reflection You Know Who, and he makes him do you-know-what--the dirty work. Lincoln Green can "grab some shuteye" and "shoot the breeze" while You Know Who waters the plants, does homework (albeit writing back-to-front as mirror reflections do), tidies up and takes on all the other chores Lincoln Green's mom says "MUST BE DONE TODAY." In Mackintosh's stylized, cartoonish, pencil-sketch drawings, wishful thinking materializes in the most delightful way: Lincoln Green is identifiable as the carefree boy in the "L" sweater, and You Know Who is the industrious boy in the "reverse L" sweater. When You Know Who's eventual rebellion starts to reflect badly on Lincoln Green, the petulant cowboy throws a boot at the mirror and cracks it. He can rake up the leaves himself! (Or perhaps--"Yip-yarr!"--his neighbor Billy will help rustle them up.) Surprise! Just tackling his tasks head-on proves easier--and more fun--than concocting an elaborate charade to avoid them, surely a lesson for all ages. The story jumps around a bit distractingly, but the premise is intriguing, and the whimsy quotient high, especially for keen-eyed observers. An imaginative, visually dynamic picture book that playfully touts the advantages--and even pleasures--of just getting things done. (Picture book. 4-8)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781419707872
  • Publisher: Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
  • Publication date: 8/20/2013
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 784,128
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: AD810L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 8.90 (w) x 11.10 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author


David Mackintosh is the author of Marshall Armstrong Is New to Our School and The Frank Show. He is a graphic designer, art director, and illustrator. His innovative book designs have won numerous awards in Britain and internationally. Born in Belfast and raised in Australia, he now lives in London. Visit him online at davidmackintosh.co.uk.
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