Stanley and the Women

Stanley and the Women

by Kingsley Amis
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

"A great storyteller, although he was much more than a storyteller."
—Keith Waterhouse
 
Just when Stanley Duke thinks it safe to sink into middle age, his son, Steve, goes insane. As if that weren't terrible enough, Stanley finds himself beset on all sides by women — neurotic, half-baked, critical or just plain capricious. As one by one

Overview

"A great storyteller, although he was much more than a storyteller."
—Keith Waterhouse
 
Just when Stanley Duke thinks it safe to sink into middle age, his son, Steve, goes insane. As if that weren't terrible enough, Stanley finds himself beset on all sides by women — neurotic, half-baked, critical or just plain capricious. As one by one they gnaw away at his composure, Stanley wonders whether insanity is not something with which all women are intimately acquainted.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"He was a genuine comic writer, probably the best after P. G. Wodhouse... He had a lasting influence and was a very good novelist."
—John Mortimer
Library Journal
Stanley is advertising manager of a London newspaper. The women are his ex-wife Nowell (```a not very good actress who isn't very beautiful'''), new wife Susan (```You certainly do marry some extraordinary people, Stanley'''), his dreadful mother-in-law, and psychiatrist Trish Collings, who's maltreating his son for schizophrenia. Rumor has it that Amis's new novel was rejected by several American publishers whose (female) editors took offense at its aggressively sexist tone. ```Would you assent to the proposition that all women are mad?''' a (male) psychiatrist asks Stanley. ```Yes. No, not all. There are exceptions, naturally.''' But in this tightly constructed, biting comedy no one comes off very well. Highly recommended for most fiction collections. Grove Koger, Boise P.L., Id.
Fromberg Schaeffer
'Stanley and the Women'' is an ingeniously contrived book. It is divided into four sections: ''Onset,'' ''Progress,'' ''Relapse'' and ''Prognosis''...Onset concludes with Steve's commitment to a mental hospital, progress ends with Steve drugged and inaccessible, relapse ends with Steve recommitted to the hospital after ostensibly stabbing his mother, and prognosis is the final and most depressing section; it is clear that Steve will not recover. A book must be judged by what it sets out to do. ''Stanley and the Women'' sets out to be a comic and serious exploration of the trouble between men and women. In the end it is neither comic nor truly serious. This is, however, a book with a vision, and it is an extremely sad one. Theoreticians of comedy claim sadness is at the heart of all humor. It is the very heart and soul of this seriously flawed and disappointing book. -- New York Times Book Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780099461043
Publisher:
Random House UK
Publication date:
03/16/2004
Edition description:
New
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 7.75(h) x 0.75(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

KINGSLEY AMIS was born in south London in 1922 and was educated at the City of London School and St John's College, Oxford. After the publication of Lucky Jim in 1954, Kingsley Amis wrote over twenty novels, including The Alteration, winner of the John W. Campbell Memorial Award, The Old Devils, winner of the Booker Prize in 1986, and The Biographer's Moustache, which was to be his last book. He also wrote on politics, education, language, films, television, restaurants and drink. Kingsley Amis was awarded the CBE in 1981 and received a knighthood in 1990. He died in October 1995.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >