Stanley Cavell and the Education of Grownups

Overview


What could it mean to speak of philosophy as the education of grownups? This book takes Stanley Cavell's much-quoted, yet enigmatic phrase as the provocation for a series of explorations into themes of education that run throughout his work - through his response to Wittgenstein, Austin and ordinary language philosophy, through his readings of Thoreau and of the moral perfectionism he identifies with Emerson, through his discussions of literature and film. Hilary Putnam has described Cavell not only as one of ...
See more details below
Hardcover (3)
$70.12
BN.com price
(Save 12%)$80.00 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (9) from $68.99   
  • New (7) from $68.99   
  • Used (2) from $70.11   
Sending request ...

Overview


What could it mean to speak of philosophy as the education of grownups? This book takes Stanley Cavell's much-quoted, yet enigmatic phrase as the provocation for a series of explorations into themes of education that run throughout his work - through his response to Wittgenstein, Austin and ordinary language philosophy, through his readings of Thoreau and of the moral perfectionism he identifies with Emerson, through his discussions of literature and film. Hilary Putnam has described Cavell not only as one of the most creative thinkers of today but as amongst the few contemporary philosophers to explore the territory of philosophy as education. Yet in mainstream philosophy his work is apt to be referred to rather than engaged with, and the full import of his writings for education is still to be appreciated. Cavell engages in a sustained exploration of the nature of philosophy, and this is not separable from his preoccupation with what it is to teach and to learn, with the kinds of transformation these might imply, and with the significance of these things for our language and politics, for our lives as a whole. In recent years Cavell's work has been the subject of a number of books of essays, but this is the first to address directly the importance of education in his work. Such matters cannot fail to be of significance not only for the disciplinary fields of philosophy and education, but in politics, literature, and film studies - and in the humanities as a whole. A substantial introduction provides an overview of the philosophical purchase of questions of education in his work, while the essays are framed by two new pieces by Cavell himself. The book shows what it means to read Cavell, and simultaneously what it means to read philosophically, in itself a part of our education as grownups.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780823234738
  • Publisher: Fordham University Press
  • Publication date: 6/1/2012
  • Series: American Philosophy Series
  • Edition description: 3
  • Pages: 280
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Naoko Saito is Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Education, University of Kyoto. She is the author of The Gleam of Light: Moral Perfectionism and Education in Dewey and Emerson.

Paul Standish is Professor of Philosophy of Education at the Institute of Education, University of London. He is the author of Beyond the Self: Wittgenstein, Heidegger and the Limits of Language.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction Paul Standish Naoko Saito 1

1 Philosophy as the Education of Grownups Stanley Cavell 19

Remarks from discussion 33

Part I Entries in the Education of Grownups

2 The Fact/Value Dichotomy and Its Critics Hilary Putnam 37

Remarks from discussion 53

3 Encountering Cavell: The Education of a Grownup Russell B. Goodman 55

Remarks from discussion 68

Part II Skepticism and Language

4 Skepticism, Acknowledgement, and the Ownership of Learning Paul Standish 73

Remarks from discussion 86

5 Sensual Schooling: On the Aesthetic Education of Grownups Gordon C.F. Beam 88

Remarks from discussion 118

Part III Moral Perfectionism and Education

6 Voice and the Interrogation of Philosophy: Inheritance, Abandonment, and Jazz Vincent Colapietro 123

Remarks from discussion 146

7 Perfectionism's Educational Address René V. Arcilia 148

Remarks from discussion 168

8 The Gleam of Light: Initiation, Prophesy, and Emersonian Moral Perfectionism Naoko Saito 170

Remarks from discussion 186

9 The Ordinary as Sublime in Cavell, Zen, and Nishida: Cavell's Philosophy of Education in East-West Perspective Steve Odin 188

Remarks from discussion 202

Coda

10 Philosophy as Education Stanley Cavell 207

Notes 215

Bibliography 243

List of Contributors 253

Index 257

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)