Star Ledger

Star Ledger

by Lynda Hull
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

In this dark but finally redemptive group of poems, the tawdry and the exquisite must coexist: Star Ledger may evoke images of the celestial, but it is also the name of the Newark morning newspaper. Such ironies continually inform Hull’s poetry, which is tough and uncompromising but richly veined with a musicality and a lyrical texture that recall earlier…  See more details below

Overview

In this dark but finally redemptive group of poems, the tawdry and the exquisite must coexist: Star Ledger may evoke images of the celestial, but it is also the name of the Newark morning newspaper. Such ironies continually inform Hull’s poetry, which is tough and uncompromising but richly veined with a musicality and a lyrical texture that recall earlier epics of the American city such as The Bridge and Paterson.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Hull ( Ghost Money ) inhabits a decaying universe swirling with trashed hopes and the ashes of burned-out desire. She often uses the metaphor of indifferent, moribund cities to convey a sense of promise unfulfilled, of ``crippled dreams'' and inexplicably wasted lives. Hers is a world where nothing is sure, where ``one minute you're dancing,'' and the next, ``you're flying / through plate glass and the whole damn town is burning.'' The subject of these poems is the poet's life, one that involves a search for connections between people and things that will give a clue to the meaning of our entropic existence. In ``Aubade,'' one of the keenest and most accessible of the poems, Hull confronts the essential loneliness of the human condition. The speaker is gardening at 5:05 a.m., and notices her neighbor exercising on his fire escape. Fantasizing a life of emptiness for this man, she contemplates calling out, `` It is I / the one for whom you have been waiting. / Come down. Let us join forces. '' The poet's wayward voice perfectly matches her vision, her images and settings often stumbling into each other for chaotic effect. This is an intensely felt, finely wrought body of work. (Apr.)
Booknews
A compiliation of the results of several symposia held since the Ciba Symposium of 1973. Ten contributions update issues arising between Frank's pressure-volume relation and Starling's length-energy relation. Topics include calcium traffic and contractile proteins, dynamics of contractions, contractile elements and ventricular geometry, comparison of pressure-volume and force-length relations, and clinical measures of ventricular function. Many charts; extensive references. I was laughing in that picture, laughing when the rainep caught us later and washed the blue dye from my shoes--ep blue, the color of bruises, of minor regretsep. From Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
From the Publisher
“Hull inhabits a decaying universe swirling with trashed hopes and the ashes of burned-out desire. . . . The poet's wayward voice perfectly matches her vision, her images and setting often stumbling into each other for chaotic effect. This is an intensely felt, finely wrought body of work.”—-Publishers Weekly

"Hull shows a refreshing concern for the integrity of the line, exploring with daunting skill the pulse and clench of vowels and consonants with a rhythmic unity. . . . The breadth and scope of Hull's moral vision are what make her poems truly rare."—-Harvard Book Review

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781587296680
Publisher:
University of Iowa Press
Publication date:
01/02/2010
Series:
Iowa Poetry Prize
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
107
Sales rank:
904,738
File size:
139 KB

Meet the Author

Lynda Hull was born in Newark in 1954. Her first volume of poetry, Ghost Money, won the Juniper Prize in 1986. Her poems have appeared in many journals, including Poetry, the New Yorker, Ploughshares, and the Gettysburg Review. She died in 1994.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >