Star Marines [NOOK Book]

Overview

With the planet's fighting men and women deployed across the galaxy—battling in the noble cause of enslaved humanity—the insidious Xul have reached across space to devastate the unsuspecting Earth with asteroid fire. Without warning, a once majestic world is reduced to near-rubble—and the very future of humankind is in dire jeopardy.

Interplanetary leaders are on the brink of abandoning Earth and its colonies to an overwhelming enemy. But Brigadier General Garroway of the ...

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Star Marines

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Overview

With the planet's fighting men and women deployed across the galaxy—battling in the noble cause of enslaved humanity—the insidious Xul have reached across space to devastate the unsuspecting Earth with asteroid fire. Without warning, a once majestic world is reduced to near-rubble—and the very future of humankind is in dire jeopardy.

Interplanetary leaders are on the brink of abandoning Earth and its colonies to an overwhelming enemy. But Brigadier General Garroway of the Marine Interstellar Expeditionary Unit is unwilling to concede defeat—not as long as there's a single marine willing to give his or her life in defense of their embattled homeworld. The ultimate battle is about to be waged—with breathtaking new attack technology, an ancient code of courage, and the help of an ally race that once inhabited the Earth—in a war that will alter the universe forever . . .

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061978999
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/6/2009
  • Series: Legacy Trilogy Series , #3
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 33,018
  • File size: 625 KB

Meet the Author

Ian Douglas, one of the many pseudonyms for writer William H. Keith, is the New York Times bestselling author of the popular military SF series The Heritage Trilogy, The Legacy Trilogy, The Inheritance Trilogy, and the ongoing Star Carrier and Star Corpsman series. A former naval corpsman, he lives in Pennsylvania.

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Read an Excerpt

Star Marines

Book Three of The Legacy Trilogy
By Ian Douglas

HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.

Copyright © 2007 Ian Douglas
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780380818266

Chapter One

12 February 2314

Assault Detachment Alpha
Above Olympus Mons,
Mars
1235 hrs, local

He was sealed inside a windowless carbotitanium laminate alloy canister so tiny there was scarcely room to breathe, much less move, but his noumenlink gave him a complete three-sixty on the view outside.

Gunnery Sergeant Travis Garroway, USMC, was streaking through thin atmosphere, hitting it hard enough to scratch a searing contrail of ionized gas across the night-black sky. His entry pod was surrounded by a faint haze of plasma, but he could still see the surface of Mars spread out beneath him like a map--all ochers and tans and rust-reds, desert colors achingly reminiscent of the American Southwest back home.

Ahead, Olympus Mons rose against the curve of the Martian horizon, enormous, stunning in its size and sweep and grandeur. The crest of Olympus Mons reached twenty-seven kilometers above the Martian desert floor--three times the height of Everest above sea level. As big as the state of Missouri, it was the largest volcano in the Solar System.

Garroway had stood at the base of that mountain three months earlier, playing tourist, and hoping to get a look at it from ground level. The results, however, had been disappointing. Olympus Mons was so large that the curve of the Martian horizonactually hid the peak from an observer standing at the mountain's base. The only way to see, to really feel the size of that monster shield volcano was to see it from orbit, or . . . as Garroway was doing now, on a hot-trajectory re-entry forty kilometers up.

"Alpha Two, Alpha Three," he called. "Do you copy? Over."

Static hissed in his earphones.

"Alpha Two, Alpha Three. Chrome, are you hearing me?"

Still nothing. The re-entry ionization was still too heavy to permit radio communications. Damn. He'd wanted to share this with Chrome--Staff Sergeant Angelina O'Meara.

A jolt caught the entry capsule, punching the breath from his lungs and eliciting a sharp, bitten-off curse. There was a popular misconception going the rounds at Eos Chasma, the Martian equivalent of an urban legend, to the effect that Olympus Mons was so tall the crest actually extended above the Martian atmosphere. He wished the idiots spreading that nonsense were with him now, enjoying the ride. The average surface pressure on Mars was only about one percent of Earth-normal, and at the top of Olympus Mons, the pressure dropped to two percent of that.

By contrast, the atmospheric pressure at the top of Mt. Everest was about twenty-five percent of the pressure at sea level; the Martian atmosphere was thin--the next best thing to hard vacuum, as Captain Fetterman liked to say--but the one-third gravity meant that it didn't get squeezed down as tightly to the surface as on Earth, but extended much farther into space. There was plenty of--thud!--atmosphere here two miles above the mountain's caldera-cloven crest to give him a hell of a ride.

Mars Military Training Command
Stickney Base,
Phobos
1236 hrs, local

Colonel Robert Ellsworth Lee lay in a couch on the Mars Observation Deck, watching the show. In reality, the tiny, inner Martian moon was currently above Elysium, over the horizon from Olympus Mons, but his noumenal link relayed the imagery from a low-altitude robotic satellite positioned to track Alpha's atmospheric entry and descent.

From this vantage point, unfolding within the window of his mind, the orange face of Mars, pitted and wrinkled, stretched across the entire black reach of the sky. A cloud of brilliant stars streaked across that face, trailing white fire.

Thirty-two of those stars were the IMACs of the Alpha drop. The rest were decoys, deployed to shield the insertion from enemy radar and laser sensors. IMAC--the acronym was pronounced "eye-mac"--stood for Individual Marine Assault Craft, a name that seemed a bit grandiloquent for something not much bigger than a large garbage can.

Ever since World War II, some 370 years before, the Marine Corps had searched for new and effective ways to deliver combat Marines to the beachhead. On an island atoll called Tarawa, in 1943, thousands of Marines had died because their landing craft had grounded on a reef well off an enemy-held beach, forcing the men to wade or swim ashore under devastating machine-gun, mortar, and artillery fire. That near-disaster had resulted in the introduction of the Marine amphibious vehicle--the AMTRACK--and, in later years, a whole zoo of armored amphibious vehicles designed to swim Marines ashore and provide them with firepower once they got there. Other innovations had included the helicopter, the tilt-rotor Osprey, and the high-speed hovercraft.

As their battlefields began extending into the vastness of space and to the surfaces of alien worlds, those delivery systems had become more and more powerful, more and more complex. The AMTRACKs, LCACs, LVTPs, and AAVs of the twentieth century had given way to various types of planetary landing and assault boats, combat shuttles, and boarding pods. IMACs were only the latest twist, derivations of the standard ship-to-ship boarding pods in use for the past century or so.

A boarding pod or an assault boat, however, had one key weakness. It had to get from here to there through enemy point-defense fire, but with the knowledge that one hit would take out the craft and every Marine packed on board--perhaps as many as fifty or more on some of the larger shuttles.

The key to survival in modern combat was dispersal. Don't provide the enemy with a few large targets, each carrying many Marines. Instead, let each Marine have his own landing craft--many, many small targets, each with one Marine sealed into a tiny, high-tech cocoon. High-energy lasers and missiles with antimatter warheads were going to score a kill if they hit the target, no matter what. Better, then, that each warhead that struck home killed one Marine rather than fifty.

Besides, for each one-man pod in flight, there might be a dozen or more decoys which, together with the high-energy electronic jamming going on, was guaranteed to give radar technicians, airspace monitor AIs, and tracking networks complete and utter breakdowns of one kind or another.



Continues...

Excerpted from Star Marines by Ian Douglas Copyright © 2007 by Ian Douglas. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 20 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 21 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 29, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    End of the series - or is it?

    Mankind gets SERIOUSLY kicked in the head by the bad boys of the galaxy - the highly xenophobic morons known as "We Who Are". I say morons only because Ian paints them as stupid enough to only send one or two ships of destruction at Earth when they could easily have sent thousands and done the job once and for all (sorry Ian, of all the books, this is the only one that made me think the "We Who Are" are truly morons - which may be but how'd they get to be the bad boys of the galaxy by being so dumb). Put that aside though, this one gaff is forgiveable when you take into consideration mankinds complete annihilation nearly occurred when "We Who Are" showed up with serious intent of eliminating humans from the face of the galaxy.
    After all the politics plays itself out, mankind - and the Marines - get serious and devise a plan to take some revenge. That's the best part of the book. The Marines, who are technologically the same as ants compared to "We Who Are", take the experiences they've gained from their friends made in the previous two books and use it to their advantage against "We Who Are" and make a great continuation story for the next book in the series, Star Strike (Inheritance Trilogy #1).
    If you like this series, take a look at "Paul Campbell's" series "The Lost Fleet". I'm sure you'll enjoy it.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 11, 2010

    great fast read

    a

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2013

    James

    He carries her to running witgh the wolves res 3

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted November 3, 2013

    Pvt joseph

    Walks in

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2013

    TRAINING GROUNDS

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2012

    Thornecho

    Anyone want to go hunting? *her white ears twitched and she chest her dull gold pelt a few licks before padding off into the woods*

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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