The Star People: A Lakota Story (PagePerfect NOOK Book)

The Star People: A Lakota Story (PagePerfect NOOK Book)

4.0 2
by S. D. Nelson
     
 

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A grandmother's love is forever In this mystical story of remembrance and tradition, Sister Girl and her brother, Young Wolf, wander far from their village and face great danger, including stampeding animals and a wall of fire. The children barely save themselves, and as night approaches, they find themselves alone in the barren and unforgiving wilderness. How will

Overview

A grandmother's love is forever In this mystical story of remembrance and tradition, Sister Girl and her brother, Young Wolf, wander far from their village and face great danger, including stampeding animals and a wall of fire. The children barely save themselves, and as night approaches, they find themselves alone in the barren and unforgiving wilderness. How will they find home? As the stars shine brightly, the spirit of their grandmother, Elk Tooth Woman, appears to guide them: "The Star People are always with you. Look up, and you will see me among the stars." S. D. Nelson's compelling illustrations, inspired by the ledger-book style of the Plains Indians, capture the beauty of humans and nature existing as one.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Sister Girl tells how she takes her younger brother Young Wolf out to see the wonders of the world. As they watch the shapes in the clouds, a thunderstorm erupts, and lightning starts a prairie fire while they are far from home. They run in fear, finding safety in a stream as the fire passes. But then they are lost in the dark. Magically the stars form the shapes of the Old Ones, including their beloved grandmother who has recently died. She guides them safely home, and promises to be with them always, watching over them with the other Star People. Nelson fills the double pages with paintings which interpret the children in a stylized fashion but render the animals and landscape more naturalistically. The skies, of course, dominate most scenes with luminous night-time sky colors with the stars as both stars and also symbols of animals and people. There is a mystical quality to the imagined story line that goes beyond the text to appeal directly to our emotions. The author fills in background material on the story, and on the illustration style as well. 2003, Harry N. Abrams, Ages 4 to 8.
— Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
Gr 1-4-A young Lakota Indian girl narrates the story of how she and her little brother, Young Wolf, survive a prairie fire. They had wandered away from their village, entranced by the changing cloud shapes created by the Cloud People. They fall into a river and are guided home by their deceased grandmother, one of the Star People, who are the spirits of the Old Ones. The acrylic illustrations are inspired by the Native American ledger-book art of the late 1800s, with figures in profile, vivid colors, and bold shapes. The art enhances the text by blending the supernatural world with that of the children's reality. When Sister Girl and Young Wolf are lost, they are depicted in a heavenly space whirling and swirling with star groups outlined to show animals like the eagle, wolf, elk, and horse. According to the author's note, the Lakota Indians refer to clouds and stars as "Cloud People" and "Star People." A solid addition to collections of Native American tales and an enjoyable read-aloud.-Linda M. Kenton, San Rafael Public Library, CA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Set in the 1800s, this traditional story retold by a member of the Standing Rock Lakota Sioux Tribe, tells of Sister Girl and her younger brother, who are caught in the middle of a raging prairie fire. The two follow the lead of the animals and are saved by falling into a shallow stream. After the fire subsides, the two children realize that they're lost. Guided by their grandmother, who resides in the heavens with the Star People, the two return safely home. Once they came to a hilltop and see that their village is below, the two children's grandmother returns to her home. Although the figures in Nelson's illustrations are not as flat as those in the traditional Lakota ledger book art, the colored pencils, pens, and crayon drawings do emulate the style with earth tones, character profiles, and images of clouds, stars, and animals. An exemplary offering. (author's note) (Picture book/folktale. 5-9)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781613127278
Publisher:
Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
Publication date:
05/19/2014
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
30 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

S. D. Nelson is a member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe of the Dakotas. He is the author of three previous children's books for Abrams. School Library Journal called Gift Horse "fluid in both narrative and illustrations," and Kirkus said Star People was "an exemplary offering." He lives in Flagstaff, Arizona.

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Star People: A Lakota Story 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Angie_Lisle More than 1 year ago
A lovely story to help children deal with the loss of a loved one (grandmother) while also preserving the art of Lakota storytelling. The artwork is simply amazing.
Forestshade More than 1 year ago
A good children story.