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Star Trek: Federation [NOOK Book]

Overview

At last! The long awaited novel featuring both famous crews of the Starship Enterprise in an epic adventure that spans time and space.
Captain Kirk and the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701 are faced with their most challenging mission yet--rescuing renowned scientist Zefram Cochrane from captors who want to use his skills to conquer the galaxy.
Meanwhile, ninety-nine years in the future on the U.S.S. ...
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Star Trek: Federation

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Overview

At last! The long awaited novel featuring both famous crews of the Starship Enterprise in an epic adventure that spans time and space.
Captain Kirk and the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701 are faced with their most challenging mission yet--rescuing renowned scientist Zefram Cochrane from captors who want to use his skills to conquer the galaxy.
Meanwhile, ninety-nine years in the future on the U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-D, Picard must rescue an important and mysterious person whose safety is vital to the survival of the Federation.
As the two crews struggle to fulfill their missions, destiny draws them closer together until past and future merge--and the fate of each of the two legendary starships rests in the hands of the other vessel...

Captain Kirk and the crew, along with Captain Picard and his crew--99 years in the future--struggle to fulfill their separate missions. But destiny intervenes to place the fate of each starship in the hands of the other vessel. Original.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Trekkers will love this novel's premise: The crew from Star TrekR: The Next Generation crosses paths with the original Star TrekR crew when they all fall into some sort of time warp. Publication is timed to coincide with the release of the next Star TrekR movie.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780743454131
  • Publisher: Pocket Books/Star Trek
  • Publication date: 9/1/2006
  • Series: Star Trek: All Series
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 480
  • Sales rank: 164,923
  • File size: 669 KB

Meet the Author

Judith & Garfield Reeves-Stevens are the authors of more than thirty books, including numerous New York Times bestselling Star Trek novels. Their newest novel of suspense, Freefall, is a follow-up to their Los Angeles Times bestseller, Icefire, and is set against the political intrigue and historical conspiracy surrounding the next race to the Moon.
In keeping with their interest in both the reality of space exploration and the science fiction that helps inspire it, in 2003 Judith and Garfield were invited to join a NASA Space Policy Workshop for the development of NASA's new goals as put forth in the agency's 2004 Vision for Space Exploration. Then, for the 2004 television season, the couple joined the writing staff of Star Trek: Enterprise as executive story editors. For more information, please visit www.reeves-stevens.com.
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Read an Excerpt


ELLISON RESEARCH OUTPOST

Stardate 9910.1

Earth Stardate:= Late September 2295

Kirk knew his journey would be ending soon.

That feeling overwhelmed him even as he resolved from the transporter beam and felt the gravity of this world reassert its hold on him-a hold it had never once relinquished over all the years, all the parsecs, which had passed from that first time to now. All that had happened since that first time was but a heartbeat to him, as if his life were dust streaming from the tail of a comet, without mass, without consequence, measured only by the moment he had first arrived at this place, and by the moment of his return.

It had been twenty-eight years since he had first set foot here, and Kirk had no doubt that he would never do so again. He could hear Spock's patient voice in his mind, blandly noting the illogic of that conclusion, given that the unexpected was all too common in their lives. But in some matters emotions took precedence. Which is why he had returned. Everything was coming to an end. No matter what Spock concluded, no matter how McCoy argued, Kirk's heart knew the truth of that feeling.

This is the last time for so many things, Kirk thought, failing into the litany that had grown in him since his retirement. Soon would come his last passage by transporter. His last look at starlight smeared by warp speed. His last glimpse of fleecy skies and Earth's cool, green hills. He thought of the old song for space travelers, written before spaceflight had even begun on Earth. He was saddened that he could not recall all of it.

"Captain Kirk, we are honored by your visit."

The words caught Kirk by surprise, though he knew they shouldn't have. The speaker was a young Vulcan woman, Academy fresh, standing at attention before the slightly raised transporter platform in the outpost's central plaza. Kirk guessed her age as no more than twenty-five years Earth standard. He hesitated on the platform, thinking back. When she had been born, he'd been returning home. The first five-year mission almost at an end. An admiralty waiting for him. Kirk cast back to the memory. He had not gone gentle into that good night. His time as a desk bound admiral had lasted less than two years. Two years of going to bed each night on Earth knowing that she was orbiting above him, being readied for another mission. And each night he had known that she would not leave spacedock without him, Starfleet and all its admirals be damned.

Kirk had been right.

V'Ger had come to claim the world and Kirk had beaten the odds again. As he always would.

No, Kirk thought. Had. Past tense. He was sixty-two years old. McCoy told him he could look forward to one hundred and twenty, even more. But the trouble with odds was that you could never really beat them, just avoid them for a while. Spock would be the first to admit that, in time, everything evened out. That was one way of looking at death, Kirk knew, the inescapable evening out of the odds. The thought brought him no comfort.

"Captain Kirk" the Vulcan began, a polite query in her tone. "is everything all right, sir?"

"Fine, Lieutenant," Kirk said. Even though he was finally, unthinkably, retired from Starfleet, a civilian again, however unlikely, the Fleet always remembered her own and this, his last rank, would be his forever.

He stepped down from the platform, hearing the whisper-soft grinding of fine red dust beneath his boot. He smiled at the Vulcan, and because Spock had been his friend for thirty years, he could see an almost undetectable shadow of emotion cross her face. Kirk blinked and looked again at the rank insignia on the white band of her tunic. He corrected himself. "Lieutenant Commander. " He supposed he should wear his glasses more often. But a lieutenant commander at twenty-five? Could the Academy really be making them that young now? Could I really be that old?

"May I show you to your quarters, sir?" The Vulcan nodded to indicate a collection of prefab habitat structures a few hundred meters away, assembled within a clearing in the ruins of the city ... or whatever it was. A quarter- century of study by the Federation's best xenoarchaeologists had been unable to reveal the purpose of this place, only that its primary structures were at least one million years old, and the age of its oldest structure was exactly what Spock had later surmised: six billion years.

There was a time when the significance of such antiquity had been overwhelming to Kirk. The central stones of this place had been carved and assembled before life had ever arisen on Earth, before Earth herself had coalesced from the dust and debris surrounding her sun. But now six billion years was merely an abstraction, a mystery he would never comprehend in his lifetime, just another fact to be placed aside, abandoned, with so many other unattainable dreams of youth.

"No, thank you," Kirk said. "I'm afraid I won't be staying long enough to make use of any quarters. The Excelsior will be arriving shortly to pick me up."

"The staff will be disappointed to hear that, sir." Kirk noted that the Vulcan hid her own disappointment well, as she did her disapproval that Starfleet's flagship had been relegated to providing a civilian with taxi service. That's not how Captain Sulu had viewed Kirk's request for a favor, but Kirk understood how others might see it.

"As you are one of the few people to have interacted with the device," the Vulcan added, almost boldly, "we had looked forward to hearing of your encounter in your own words."

Kirk looked around the plaza, anxious to continue without further conversation. "It's all in my original logs. I'm sure they offer more detail than I could recall today."

In what was, for a Vulcan, surely a near act of desperation, the lieutenant commander impassively asked, "Is there nothing we can do to have you extend your stay with us?"

"No," Kirk said. It was that final. In less than two months the Excelsior-class Enterprise B would be launched from spacedock. Kirk wasn't certain what was drawing him back to Earth for that occasion. He had no intention of ever again setting foot on a starship as anything other than a passenger. He still recalled too well the haunted look on Chris Pike's face when they had spoken the day Kirk had taken command of the first Enterprise. From that first day, that first hour, somehow Kirk, too, had known that that was how his own journey would end. With the Enterprise, or her namesake, going on without him. Even here, it made him uncomfortable to contemplate that moment to come in his future. There had been so much he had wanted to accomplish, so much he had accomplished, and yet the two never seemed to overlap Forty-six years in Starfleet, and his losses still seemed to outweigh his gains.

Kirk caught sight of a distinctive pillar at the far edge of the plaza. Floodlights had been set up on slender tripods around it, changing the dark color of the stone he remembered to something lighter. There was writing on it as well, intricate lines of alien script like the overlapping edges of waves on a beach. He didn't remember having seen writing there before, but no doubt the archaeologists had cleaned away the encrustations of millennia.

"That way, isn't it?" Kirk asked, already walking toward the pillar, knowing what he would find beyond.

"Yes, sir," the Vulcan said. She fell into step beside him, her tricorder bouncing against her hip as she hurried to match his stride. "If I may, sir, as you know, it gave no indication that the conversation of stardate 7328 would be its last communication with us."

"And that surprises you?" Kirk interrupted. He picked up the pace before she could answer. He felt he was swimming in sensations-the taste of the bone-dry air that drew the moisture from his lungs, the lightness of the gravity, the slight re~adiness of sound distorted by the thin atmosphere. He was thirty-four again, filled with purpose, pushing eagerly at the edge of all the boundaries that encompassed him.

"Surprise connotates an emotional response," the Vulcan said primly, "which has no place in a scientific investigation."

Her response, all too predictable, wearied him. Such earnestness was best served by youth. Let her devote the next four decades of her life to this mystery if she would. Kirk no longer had that luxury.

"Instead," she continued, "it could be said we were perplexed by its silence, especially in light of the conversations you reported with it, and its apparent willingness to answer any-"

"Yes, fine, very good, Lieutenant Commander." Kirk let the sharp words spill out of him, anything to have her stop talking. "If I could just have a few moments . . ."

He sensed her falter beside him and he walked on, alone, past the pillar and the floodlights, around a fallen wall, a tumble of columns, and-yes!-there-right where he remembered it. Right where it had remained through all these years, haunting him, forever haunting him, just as its name had foretold.

The Guardian of Forever.

A large, rough-hewn torus, three meters in diameter. A repository of knowledge. A passageway into time. Its own beginning and its own ending. A mystery. Perhaps, the mystery.

Kirk paused and gazed upon the Guardian. Like the pillar, its color was different, changed by the floodlights that ringed it. There were sensor arrays nearby as well, sheets of gleaming white duraplast on the ground around it to keep the soil from being disturbed by the many scientists who toiled to learn its secrets.

Kirk gazed upon the Guardian, and remembered.

A question. Since before your sun burned hot in space and before your race was born. I have awaited a question....

Those had been the first words the Guardian had spoken to him. An investigation of temporal distortions had brought the Enteprise to this world. McCoy had accidentally injected himself with an overdose of cordrazine and in fleeing his rescuers had passed through the Guardian into Earth's past. There he had changed history so that the Federation never arose, so that the Enterprise no longer flew through space, so that Kirk and Uhura and Spock and Scott were trapped in this city, on the edge of forever, with their only chance of restoring the universe they knew waiting in the past.

Kirk closed his eyes, the cruel memories still alive within him.

The universe had been restored. The Enterprise returned to him. And the price had only been the death of one woman. The one woman he had truly loved.

Her name formed on his lips.

"Edith," he whispered.

Kirk knew the Vulcan would hear him, but he no longer cared. Caring was for youth, and at this moment, Kirk felt as old as the stones of this place.

He walked across the ruddy soil until he came to the duraplast sheets. A permanent static charge repelled the dust and kept the sheets clean. His boot heels clicked across their hard, slick surface. He heard the Vulcan follow.

Now, no more than a meter from it, Kirk stopped to study the mottled surface of the Guardian. It had glowed when it spoke so many years ago, pulsing with an inner energy no one had ever been able to trace to a source, just as they had been unable to replicate whatever mechanism had initially allowed the Guardian to act as a gateway through time. The most detailed sensor scans possible consistently reported that the Guardian was no more than a piece of granitic rock, hand- carved, and that was all.

"Perhaps you could ask it something, sir,~" the Vulcan suggested, after a moment of respectful silence.

There were a thousand questions Kirk could think to ask. Perhaps that was why he had returned. But for now, none seemed worth asking. "Do you really think it would do any good?" he asked. He glanced behind him and saw the Vulcan staring intently at the Guardian, as if that simple question asked in a familiar voice might stir the intelligence locked within the stone.

"The Vulcan Science Academy spent years in conversation with the Guardian, sir. It offered virtually infinite knowledge, ours for the mere asking. But-"

Kirk held up his hand to stop her. He knew the story. The Guardian did claim to be the repository of infinite knowledge, present, past, and future. But it seemed that there were inherent limitations to the languages of the Federation and the minds of the scientists who had engaged the Guardian in conversation. Too many times the Guardian had said it was unable to respond until a more precise question had been asked, yet it provided no clues as to how particular questions might be framed more precisely.

A human scientist had summed up eight years of frustrated research by equating the total of recorded conversations between the Guardian and humans to an exchange that might be expected between a human and dogs. The smartest, non- genetically engineered dogs might have a vocabulary of five hundred words, and comprehend a handful of actions and even abstract concepts such as direction and the duration of short periods of time. But what about the other hundred thousand words a dog's master could use? What hope did a dog have of understanding its master's philosophy and biochemistry and multiphysics? How could a dog even attempt to respond to its master in the human's own spoken words? It was frustrating and humbling for humans to be relegated to the status of mute animals, knowing no way to reach up to the Guardian.

The scientist had bitterly concluded that the researchers at Ellison Outpost had spent eight years conversing with a stone, and had gotten exactly the same results as they might get from asking questions of any rock. A few months later, the Guardian had ceased to respond to questions at all, as if confirming the scientist's assessment.

The Vulcan kept her face blank, but her next words, to Kirk's attuned ears, were a plea by any other name. "I would find it most interesting if you would ask it a question, sir."

Kirk nodded. It was a small enough request. In a few minutes, a few hours at most, he would be gone, but the Vulcan would still work here. Why leave her with regrets?

He turned to the Guardian, focusing on its wide opening through which the other side of the plaza was clear and unobstructed. The ruins beyond stretched to the horizon.

"Guardian," Kirk said in a firm, commanding tone, "do you remember me?"

The Vulcan betrayed her extreme youth by holding her breath in audible anticipation. An instant later, she remembered the tricorder at her side and brought it up to check its readings of the mute stone.

"Guardian," Kirk repeated, "show me the history of my world."

The space bound by the circle of stone was unchanged.

Kirk turned to the Vulcan. "I'm sorry," he said. And in an abstract way, he was, even though the mysteries of the Guardian had moved beyond his concern.

"Thank you for trying, sir," the Vulcan said. Then she switched off her tricorder and stood with her hands behind her back, as if she were stone herself and had no intention of leaving his side.

In the past, Kirk might have paused to consider a polite way to ask what he asked next, but time had become more important than hurt feelings these days.

"Lieutenant Commander," he said, "I would appreciate it if you would leave me alone here."

The startled Vulcan hid her surprise again, though not as well as the first time.

"Is anything wrong, sir?"

"I wish to meditate." It was a lie, of course, but one with which no Vulcan would argue.

"Of course, sir," the Vulcan said. She began to walk away. Kirk turned back to the stone. Then he heard her footsteps stop. He looked back at her. A wind had sprung up. Her severely cut hair fluttered against her pointed ears.

"Sir," she called out over the growing wind, "this outpost has standing orders that personnel are never to step through the opening in the Guardian. We do not know if or when it might become operational again."

"Understood," Kirk called back, and the Vulcan left him. He was alone with the Guardian. He stared through the opening. Is this what I've come back for? Kirk thought. With no more future before me, did I hope in some way to return to the past?

The wind gusted and Kirk felt himself pushed toward the stone, caught in a swirl of obscuring dust that made his eyes water and his throat raw. He reached out a hand to steady himself. The Guardian was cold to his touch.

He felt tired.

He thought of the stateroom Sulu would have for him on the Excelsior. A soft bed. He could even turn down the gravity to ease the ache in his back. The old knife wound he had gotten just before the Coridan Babel Conference so many years ago had been coming back to taunt him of late. Assisted by too many other past injuries, too many sudden transports into different gravity fields.

"Has it come to this?" Kirk asked the wind and the dust. "Will there be no more worlds to explore? No more battles to fight?"

The Guardian was silent.

Just as Kirk had known it would be.

There would be no more miracles for him in this universe. He had captured a part of it in his life, imprinted a thousand worlds in his mind, had experiences and adventures that humans of centuries past could not conceive, and which humans of centuries to come could never repeat.

He should be content with that, he knew.

But he wasn't.

For all his confidence, his bravado, his skills and talent and drive to be the best, in his heart, at his core, there were doubts.

Too many words left unsaid. Too many actions left undone. Too many questions gone unanswered.

And now, with the joumey's end in sight, with the knowledge that it was time to put aside those things left unfinished, Kirk was not ready.

His doubts tortured him.

Edith, his love, in a roadway of old Earth, the truck rushing for her ...

David, his son, on the Genesis planet, with a Klingon knife above his heart ...

Garrovick, his commander, and 200 crew facing death on Tycho IV ...

For all that Kirk had done, had he done enough? Could anyone have done enough? Or was it all without meaning? Was life a simple tragedy of distraction from birth to death, with no more purpose than this stone before him? Kirk knew his journey would be ending soon, and this far into it, he still did not understand what had driven him to take it, nor long to continue it.

Alone, he whispered a single word to the wind and the dust.

"Why?"

And for the first time in two decades, the Guardian of Forever answered....

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 35 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 35 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 23, 2012

    Highly recommend for Star Trek fans

    This is a great book for Star Trek fans that starts at the begining of warp drive up the Star Trek Next Generation. It has very interesting chacter study and holds your interest throughout the book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 25, 2010

    A great book not only for trekkies

    This is just a great book in general. Not only does it tie-in greatly but it could also stand alone for a newer star trek fan. The authors did a great job figuring out the mysterious and often overlooked Zephram Cochran. It is just a great book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2008

    A Contemporary Classic

    One of the best books I¿ve ever read, Star Trek or not. Judith and Garfield are amazing writers who have created several of the greatest Star trek adventures ever, and this is one of the best. You won't want to put this one down.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2005

    A decent crossover

    This book is in three crisscrossing time periods: a biography of Zefram Cochrane, the Enterprise meeting Cochrane for the second time, and the Enterprise D doing something I forget. (It's been a while) The best part is the explanation of warp drive that conveniently becomes the Enterprise starburst command insignia, but a close second is the part where the two Enterprises meet without actually interacting. Read the book to see how.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2003

    Awesome all but one point

    As a collector of Star Trek material: Written and Screenplay. I have found one of the biggest innacuracies to date. The timeline involving Cochrans developing the warp drive and the location and reasons for first contact with the vulcans... Other than that the ongoing alternate timelines in written material such as this continue to satisfy my cravings for new Star Trek material. Enjoy. But in order to enjoy you must ignore the description of the Cochrane timeline in this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2002

    The Best Crossover Novel Yet-(and it's over five years old!)

    Federation is the best inter-series novel written to date. It was written with care for what had happened in the series (plural), and with dedication to the writer's craft. Even though the action constantly jumps between three different timelines in the Star Trek Universe, the seams don't show. The best periods from both the Original Series and the Next Generation were selected for backgroud. They were then tied to some excellent sequences involving a pre series and pre First Contact Zefram Cochrane. One of Flint's past personae was thrown in for good measure. Readers who are loyal to reading either the Original Series or the Next Generation, and have resisted sampling either of the other series, should try Federation. They won't regret the introductory experience.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2001

    GO AND BUY THIS RIGHT NOW

    Right Trek fans-whether you're a fan of the original series or whatever else, this novel is definitive, go and get it right now, it has a great mix of the generations, action, romance and the ever famous sparring between McCoy and Spock not to mention their friendship with the rest of the command crew, the camraderie in both generations is obvious to see. I absolutely loved it and want to congratulate the authors-Judith and Garfield Reeves Stevens

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2000

    A Brilliant Novel Spanning the Generations of the Federation

    This book is thoroughly enjoyable, mainly because it spans more than 3 generations of the Federation, in a story that is captivating. If you are a fan of the Original Series, then there is something for you. If you are a fan of TNG, there is something for you too. And for those of you who have wanted to see two of the finest Captains in the Federation in one story, this is the book.........

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2012

    TheLady

    I think this is a good book

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  • Posted June 29, 2012

    One of the best ST novels ever. This is what ST:First Contact SH

    One of the best ST novels ever. This is what ST:First Contact SHOULD have been!

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  • Posted December 26, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    SUPERB!

    This is the perfect book for TOS & TNG lovers.

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  • Posted October 7, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Excellent book

    Very good book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2006

    Republished - as it should be

    An excellent addition to the Star Trek saga, especially if you are a fan of both the original series and The Next Generation. This is what the movie 'First Contact' should have been.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2001

    The Federation- its own War

    This book was really fun- I must say, I particularly enjoyed the chapters based on Cochrane's life and his struggle with Thorsen. Basically, the title shouldn't be called the 'Federation' but more like 'Federation Fathers.' Since the book's about Cochrane, Kirk, and Picard, not the acsuall birth of it in the 2100's. More to the topic, this book gives the reader a sense of sympathy (or empathy depending on the person) on how Cochrane- the father of Earth's warp travel, ran from the ultimate future's evil- Thorsen. I believe more emotion is felt toward Cochrane than Kirk or Picard.

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    Posted July 19, 2012

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    Posted March 26, 2013

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    Posted September 26, 2011

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    Posted July 2, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2013

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    Posted May 17, 2011

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