Star Wars Planet of Twilight

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Overview

It all begins on a barren backwater world called Renat Chorios - once a dreaded prison colony, now home to the Therans, a fanatic religious cult. To this exiled world has come the ruthless warlord Seti Draconis, who seeks to exploit the vast crystalline deserts that cover the planet's desolate surface. The first step in his plan is to lure Princess Leia to Renat Chorios for a diplomatic meeting, only to hold her hostage in his isolated fortress. His ultimate goal is to destroy the Therans, take over the planet, ...
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Overview

It all begins on a barren backwater world called Renat Chorios - once a dreaded prison colony, now home to the Therans, a fanatic religious cult. To this exiled world has come the ruthless warlord Seti Draconis, who seeks to exploit the vast crystalline deserts that cover the planet's desolate surface. The first step in his plan is to lure Princess Leia to Renat Chorios for a diplomatic meeting, only to hold her hostage in his isolated fortress. His ultimate goal is to destroy the Therans, take over the planet, and sell its valuable crystals to the remnants of the Empire, who will use the crystals to develop unstoppable deep-space missiles that will turn the tide of war against the New Republic. With Leia as his hostage, there is nothing to stop him. Meanwhile, Luke lands on Renat Chorios in search of his lost love, Callista, only to discover that any use of the Force has unexpectedly deadly consequences. To make matters worse, a plague is decimating the New Republic fleet as it faces attack from overwhelming imperial forces led by Moff Getelles and his henchman, Admiral Larm. As Han, Chewie, and Lando set out from Coruscant on a desperate rescue mission, as Leia seeks to escape the evil Draconis, and as Luke searches through a world torn by plague and riots to find Callista, the planet begins to reveal its unspeakable secret: a long dormant sentient life-form kept in check for centuries is now threatening to gain dominance over the New Republic, the Empire, and the entire galaxy!
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
With the Star Wars films soaring in theaters, interest in Hambly's sequel to her Children of the Jedi (1995) should be highand, as usual, Hambly meets the challenge. In this latest episode in the never-ending saga, the New Republic, like any fledgling organization, is suffering growing pangs. As chief of state, Princess Leia Organa Solo has the thankless task of handling diplomatic relations with the distant Chorios system, represented by the charismatic Seti Ashgad. Leader of the progressive Rationalist Party, Ashgad seeks economic alliancean arrangement Chorios's fanatically conservative "Oldtimer" majority views with outright hostility. As Luke Skywalker sets off to find the reincarnated Jedi Callista on Ashgad's homeworld, Ashgad kidnaps Leia and sets off a sinister plot to remove the rest of his opposition one by one. See-Threepio and Artoo-Deetoo's luckless attempts to warn the Republican Council of Leia's kidnapping provide comic relief, while Han Solo leads the cavalry that rides to the rescue just in time. Hambly juggles it all with consummate skill, investing convincing characters and settings with plenty of vigor. As media tie-ins go, this one is on the upper end of the curve and is sure to be a hit with casual Star Wars fans as well as longtime admirers.
VOYA - Nancy K. Wallace
While Luke Skywalker sets out to find Callista, his lost love from Children of the Jedi (Bantam, 1995/VOYA October 1995, Leia Organa Solo, chief of state of the New Republic, is kidnapped by an evil duo intent on releasing The Death Seed, a particularly virulent strain of deadly plague. Han and Lando launch immediate rescue efforts and the two charming droids, See-Threepio and Artoo-Detoo, separated from their human companions, have their own madcap adventure. Replete with excitement, danger, and imaginative aliens, Hambly's sequel to her last Star Wars novel, carefully ties in the original movie trilogy and preceding series novels. While it helps to have kept up up with previous books, this novel stands alone as a good, old fashioned, action-packed adventure story. Character development, however, also is an important part of Hambly's novels, and this one is no exception. Through Callista's training, Leia is responsible for her first victory as a warrior, not just a diplomat. While the romantics around us might hope Luke and Callista might forge a lasting alliance, she remains out of reach, and he is left alone again. From carnivorous fungi and life-draining insects to a strange planet that dangerously warps the power of the force, this page-turner rates a place in any Star Wars collection. VOYA Codes: 4Q 4P M J S (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses, Broad general YA appeal, Middle School-defined as grades 6 to 8, Junior High-defined as grades 7 to 9 and Senior High-defined as grades 10 to 12).
Library Journal
Another installment in a best-selling series from veteran Star WarsR author Hambly.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780553471960
  • Publisher: Random House Audio Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 3/28/1997
  • Series: Star Wars Series
  • Format: Cassette
  • Edition description: Abridged, 2 Cassettes, 3 hrs.
  • Product dimensions: 4.36 (w) x 7.12 (h) x 0.72 (d)

Read an Excerpt

The first to die was a midshipman named Koth Barak.

One of his fellow crewmembers on the New Republic escort cruiser Adamantine found him slumped across the table in the deck-nine break room, where he'd repaired half an hour previously for a cup of coffeine. Twenty minutes after Barak should have been back to post, Gunnery Sergeant Gallie Wover went looking for him, exasperatedly certain that he'd clicked into the infolog banks "just to see if anybody mentions the mission."

Of course, nobody was going to mention the mission. Though accompanied by the Adamantine, Chief of State Leia Organa Solo's journey to the Meridian sector was an entirely unofficial one. The Rights of Sentience Party would have argued--quite correctly--that Seti Ashgad, the man she was to meet at the rendezvous point just outside the Chorios systems, held no official position on his homeworld of Nam Chorios. To arrange an official conference would be to give tacit approval of his, and the Rationalist Party's, demands.

Which was, when it came down to it, the reason for the talks.

When she entered the deck nine break room, Sergeant Wover's first sight was of the palely flickering blue on blue of the infolog screen "Blast it, Koth, I told you..."

Then she saw the young man stretched unmoving on the far side of the screen, head on the break table, eyes shut. Even at a distance of three meters Wover didn't like the way he was breathing.

"Koth!" She rounded the table in two strides, sending the other chairs clattering into a corner. She thought his eyelids moved a little when she yelled his name. "Koth!"

Wover hit the emergency call almost withoutconscious decision. In the few moments before the med droids arrived she sniffed the coffeine in the gray plastene cup a few centimeters from his limp fingers. It wasn't even cold. A thin film of it adhered to the peach fuzz beginnings of what Koth optimistically referred to as his mustache. The stuff in the cup smelled okay--at least as okay as fleet coffeine ever smelled--and there was no question of alcohol or drugs. Not on a Republic escort. Not where Koth was concerned. He was a good kid.

Wover was an engine room regular who'd done fifteen years in merchant planet-hoppers rather than stay in the regular fleet after Palpatine's goons gained power: she looked after "her" midshipmen as if they were the sons she'd lost to the Rebellion. She would have known if there had been trouble with booze or spice or giggle-dust.

Disease?

It was any longtime spacer's nightmare. But the "good-faith" team that had come onboard yesterday from Seti Ashgad's small vessel had passed through the medical scan; and in any ease, the planet Nam Chorios had been on the books for four centuries without any mention of an endemic planetary virus. Everyone on the Light of Reason had come straight from the planet.

Still, Wover pecked the Commander's code on the wall panel.

"Sir? Wover here. One of the midshipmen's down. The meds haven't gotten here yet but..." Behind her the break room door swooshed open. She glanced over her shoulder to see a couple of Two-Onebees enter with a table, which was already unfurling scanners and life-support lines like a monster in a bad holovid. "It looks serious. No, sir, I don't know what it is, but you might want to check with Her Excellency's flagship, and the Light, and let them know. Okay, okay," she added, turning as a Two-Onebee posted itself politely in front of her. "My heart is yours," she declared jocularly, and the droid paused for a moment, data bytes cascading with a faint clickety-click as it laboriously assembled the 85 percent probability that the remark was a jest.

"Many thanks, Sergeant Wover," it said politely, "but the organ itself will not be necessary. A function reading will suffice."

The next instant Wover turned, aghast, as the remaining Two-Onebee shifted Barak onto the table and hooked him up. Every line of the readouts plunged, and soft, tinny alarms began to sound. "Festering groats!" Wover yanked free of her examiner to stride to the boy's side. "What in the name of daylight ...?"

Barak's face had gone a waxen gray. The table was already pumping stimulants and antishock into the boy's veins, and the Two-Onebee plugged into the other side had the blank-eyed look of a droid transmitting to other stations within the ship. Wover could see the initial diagnostic lines on the screens that ringed the antigrav personnel transport unit's sides.

No virus. No bacteria. No poison.

No foreign material in Koth Barak's body at all.

The lines dipped steadily toward zero, then went flat.


"We have a complicated situation on Nam Chorios, Your Excellency." Seti Ashgad turned from the four-meter bubble of the observation viewport, to regard the woman who sat, slender and coolly watchful, in one of the lounge's gray leather chairs.

"We meaning whom, Master Ashgad?" Leia Organa Solo, Chief of State of the New Republic, had a surprising voice, deeper than one might expect. A petite, almost fragile-looking woman, her relative youth would have surprised anyone who didn't know that from the age of seventeen she'd been heavily involved in the Rebellion spearheaded by her father and the great stateswoman Mon Mothma: with her father's death, she was virtually its core. She'd commanded troops, dodged death, and fled halfway across the galaxy with a price on her head before she was twenty-three. She was thirty-one now and didn't look it, except for her eyes. "The inhabitants of Nam Chorios? Or only some of them?"

"All of them." Ashgad strode back to her, standing too close, trying to dominate her with his height and the fact that he was standing and she remained in her chair. But she looked up at him with an expression in her brown eyes that told him she knew exactly what he was doing, or trying to do, and he stepped back. "All of us," he corrected himself. "Newcomers and Therans alike."

Leia folded her hands on her knee, the wide velvet sleeves and voluminous skirt of her crimson ceremonial robe picking up the soft sheen of the hidden lamps overhead and of the distant stars hanging in darkness beyond the curved bubble of the port. Even five years ago she would have remarked tartly on the fact that he was omitting mention of the largest segment of the planet's population, those who were neither the technological post-Imperial Newcomers nor the ragged Theran cultists who haunted the cold and waterless wastes, but ordinary farmers. Now she gave him silence, waiting to see what else he would say.

"I should explain," Ashgad went on, in the rich baritone that so closely resembled the recordings she had heard of his father's, "that Nam Chorios is a barren and hostile world. Without massive technology it is literally not possible to make a living there."

"The prisoners sent to Nam Chorios by the Grissmath Dynasty seem to have managed for the past seven hundred years."

The man looked momentarily nonplussed. Then he smiled, big and wide and white. "Ah, I see Your Excellency has studied the history of the sector." He tried to sound pleased about it.

"Enough to know the background of the situation," replied Leia pleasantly. "I know that the Grissmaths shipped their political prisoners there, in the hopes that they'd starve to death, and set automated gun stations all over the planet to keep them from being rescued. I know not only that the prisoners didn't oblige them by dying but that their descendants--and the descendants of the guards--are still farming the water seams while the Grissmath homeworld of Meridias itself is just a ball of charred radioactive waste."

There was, in fact, very little else in the Registry concerning Nam Chorios. The place had been an absolute backwater for centuries. The only reason Leia had ever heard of it at all before the current crisis was that her father had once observed that the old Emperor Palpatine seemed to be using Nam Chorios for its original purpose: as a prison world. Forty years ago it had been rumored that the elder Seti Ashgad had been kidnapped and stranded on that isolated and unapproachable planet by agents of his political foe, the then-Senator Palpatine. Those rumors had remained unproven until this second Ashgad, like a blackhaired duplicate of the graying old power broker who had disappeared, had made contact with the Council in the wake of the squabbling on the planet and asked to be heard.

Though there was no reason, Leia thought, to make this man aware of how little she or anyone knew about the planet or the situation.

Do not meet with Ashgad, the message had said, that had reached her literally as she was preparing to board the shuttle to take her to her flagship. Do not trust him, or accede to any demand that he makes. Above all, do not go to the Meridian sector.

"Very good!" He passed the compliment like a kidney stone, though he managed a droll and completely automatic little chuckle as a chaser. "But the situation isn't as simple as that, of course."

From a corner of the lounge, where a dark-leaved dyanthis vine shadowed the area near the observation port, a soft voice whispered, "They never are, are they?"

"Well, I was given to understand that the only inhabitants of the planet before colonization recommenced after the fall of the Empire were descendants of the original Meridian prisoners and guards."

In the shadow of the vine, Ashgad's secretary, Dzym, smiled.
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First Chapter

The first to die was a midshipman named Koth Barak.

One of his fellow crewmembers on the New Republic escort cruiser Adamantine found him slumped across the table in the deck-nine break room, where he'd repaired half an hour previously for a cup of coffeine. Twenty minutes after Barak should have been back to post, Gunnery Sergeant Gallie Wover went looking for him, exasperatedly certain that he'd clicked into the infolog banks "just to see if anybody mentions the mission."

Of course, nobody was going to mention the mission. Though accompanied by the Adamantine, Chief of State Leia Organa Solo's journey to the Meridian sector was an entirely unofficial one. The Rights of Sentience Party would have argued--quite correctly--that Seti Ashgad, the man she was to meet at the rendezvous point just outside the Chorios systems, held no official position on his homeworld of Nam Chorios. To arrange an official conference would be to give tacit approval of his, and the Rationalist Party's, demands.

Which was, when it came down to it, the reason for the talks.

When she entered the deck nine break room, Sergeant Wover's first sight was of the palely flickering blue on blue of the infolog screen "Blast it, Koth, I told you..."

Then she saw the young man stretched unmoving on the far side of the screen, head on the break table, eyes shut. Even at a distance of three meters Wover didn't like the way he was breathing.

"Koth!" She rounded the table in two strides, sending the other chairs clattering into a corner. She thought his eyelids moved a little when she yelled his name. "Koth!"

Wover hit the emergency call almost without conscious decision. In the few moments before the med droids arrived she sniffed the coffeine in the gray plastene cup a few centimeters from his limp fingers. It wasn't even cold. A thin film of it adhered to the peach fuzz beginnings of what Koth optimistically referred to as his mustache. The stuff in the cup smelled okay--at least as okay as fleet coffeine ever smelled--and there was no question of alcohol or drugs. Not on a Republic escort. Not where Koth was concerned. He was a good kid.

Wover was an engine room regular who'd done fifteen years in merchant planet-hoppers rather than stay in the regular fleet after Palpatine's goons gained power: she looked after "her" midshipmen as if they were the sons she'd lost to the Rebellion. She would have known if there had been trouble with booze or spice or giggle-dust.

Disease?

It was any longtime spacer's nightmare. But the "good-faith" team that had come onboard yesterday from Seti Ashgad's small vessel had passed through the medical scan; and in any ease, the planet Nam Chorios had been on the books for four centuries without any mention of an endemic planetary virus. Everyone on the Light of Reason had come straight from the planet.

Still, Wover pecked the Commander's code on the wall panel.

"Sir? Wover here. One of the midshipmen's down. The meds haven't gotten here yet but..." Behind her the break room door swooshed open. She glanced over her shoulder to see a couple of Two-Onebees enter with a table, which was already unfurling scanners and life-support lines like a monster in a bad holovid. "It looks serious. No, sir, I don't know what it is, but you might want to check with Her Excellency's flagship, and the Light, and let them know. Okay, okay," she added, turning as a Two-Onebee posted itself politely in front of her. "My heart is yours," she declared jocularly, and the droid paused for a moment, data bytes cascading with a faint clickety-click as it laboriously assembled the 85 percent probability that the remark was a jest.

"Many thanks, Sergeant Wover," it said politely, "but the organ itself will not be necessary. A function reading will suffice."

The next instant Wover turned, aghast, as the remaining Two-Onebee shifted Barak onto the table and hooked him up. Every line of the readouts plunged, and soft, tinny alarms began to sound. "Festering groats!" Wover yanked free of her examiner to stride to the boy's side. "What in the name of daylight ...?"

Barak's face had gone a waxen gray. The table was already pumping stimulants and antishock into the boy's veins, and the Two-Onebee plugged into the other side had the blank-eyed look of a droid transmitting to other stations within the ship. Wover could see the initial diagnostic lines on the screens that ringed the antigrav personnel transport unit's sides.

No virus. No bacteria. No poison.

No foreign material in Koth Barak's body at all.

The lines dipped steadily toward zero, then went flat.


"We have a complicated situation on Nam Chorios, Your Excellency." Seti Ashgad turned from the four-meter bubble of the observation viewport, to regard the woman who sat, slender and coolly watchful, in one of the lounge's gray leather chairs.

"We meaning whom, Master Ashgad?" Leia Organa Solo, Chief of State of the New Republic, had a surprising voice, deeper than one might expect. A petite, almost fragile-looking woman, her relative youth would have surprised anyone who didn't know that from the age of seventeen she'd been heavily involved in the Rebellion spearheaded by her father and the great stateswoman Mon Mothma: with her father's death, she was virtually its core. She'd commanded troops, dodged death, and fled halfway across the galaxy with a price on her head before she was twenty-three. She was thirty-one now and didn't look it, except for her eyes. "The inhabitants of Nam Chorios? Or only some of them?"

"All of them." Ashgad strode back to her, standing too close, trying to dominate her with his height and the fact that he was standing and she remained in her chair. But she looked up at him with an expression in her brown eyes that told him she knew exactly what he was doing, or trying to do, and he stepped back. "All of us," he corrected himself. "Newcomers and Therans alike."

Leia folded her hands on her knee, the wide velvet sleeves and voluminous skirt of her crimson ceremonial robe picking up the soft sheen of the hidden lamps overhead and of the distant stars hanging in darkness beyond the curved bubble of the port. Even five years ago she would have remarked tartly on the fact that he was omitting mention of the largest segment of the planet's population, those who were neither the technological post-Imperial Newcomers nor the ragged Theran cultists who haunted the cold and waterless wastes, but ordinary farmers. Now she gave him silence, waiting to see what else he would say.

"I should explain," Ashgad went on, in the rich baritone that so closely resembled the recordings she had heard of his father's, "that Nam Chorios is a barren and hostile world. Without massive technology it is literally not possible to make a living there."

"The prisoners sent to Nam Chorios by the Grissmath Dynasty seem to have managed for the past seven hundred years."

The man looked momentarily nonplussed. Then he smiled, big and wide and white. "Ah, I see Your Excellency has studied the history of the sector." He tried to sound pleased about it.

"Enough to know the background of the situation," replied Leia pleasantly. "I know that the Grissmaths shipped their political prisoners there, in the hopes that they'd starve to death, and set automated gun stations all over the planet to keep them from being rescued. I know not only that the prisoners didn't oblige them by dying but that their descendants--and the descendants of the guards--are still farming the water seams while the Grissmath homeworld of Meridias itself is just a ball of charred radioactive waste."

There was, in fact, very little else in the Registry concerning Nam Chorios. The place had been an absolute backwater for centuries. The only reason Leia had ever heard of it at all before the current crisis was that her father had once observed that the old Emperor Palpatine seemed to be using Nam Chorios for its original purpose: as a prison world. Forty years ago it had been rumored that the elder Seti Ashgad had been kidnapped and stranded on that isolated and unapproachable planet by agents of his political foe, the then-Senator Palpatine. Those rumors had remained unproven until this second Ashgad, like a blackhaired duplicate of the graying old power broker who had disappeared, had made contact with the Council in the wake of the squabbling on the planet and asked to be heard.

Though there was no reason, Leia thought, to make this man aware of how little she or anyone knew about the planet or the situation.

Do not meet with Ashgad, the message had said, that had reached her literally as she was preparing to board the shuttle to take her to her flagship. Do not trust him, or accede to any demand that he makes. Above all, do not go to the Meridian sector.

"Very good!" He passed the compliment like a kidney stone, though he managed a droll and completely automatic little chuckle as a chaser. "But the situation isn't as simple as that, of course."

From a corner of the lounge, where a dark-leaved dyanthis vine shadowed the area near the observation port, a soft voice whispered, "They never are, are they?"

"Well, I was given to understand that the only inhabitants of the planet before colonization recommenced after the fall of the Empire were descendants of the original Meridian prisoners and guards."

In the shadow of the vine, Ashgad's secretary, Dzym, smiled.

Excerpted from STAR WARS®: PLANET OF TWILIGHT by Barbara Hambly ®, TM, © 1998 by Lucasfilm, Ltd. Excerpted by permission of Bantam Books, a division of the Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group, Inc. All rights reserved. Used by permission. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 26 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(5)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(9)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(5)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 26 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2006

    Who let her write another Star Wars Book?

    I had to choke my way thru Children of The Jedi, now I have to read this because its the follow-on to Darksaber?! Her Star Wars books where the most difficult to read out of all the authors I've read! I must say she helped me with my insomnia problems!

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2012

    Completely idiotic

    Who gave her the right to make such a bad book?

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2012

    Pretty darn good

    Very good story.IF YOU DO NOT LIKE IT ,FINE,BUT DO NOT,i repeat,DO NOT,ASK WHO GAVE HER THE RIGHT TO WRITE IT,YOU DAD-STINKIN IDIOT!WHO GAVE YOU THE RIGHT TO LIVE IN THIS COUNTRY!!!?!?

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 7, 2010

    Not Very Good

    Callista was a good character, but this particular story left me unsatisfied. The ending was just not as exciting as it could have been. If you are looking for a good work of Star Wars by Barbara Hambly, look to "Nightlily" in the "Tales From the Cantina" short story collection.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2009

    Another exciting story within the Star Wars universe.

    Extends deeper into the series so more is learned about the lead characters.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2005

    It has its ups it has its downs...

    Sure, there were portions of this novel that could have been left out, but that can be said of any novel! The most interesting character of all is Dzym (funny no one else mentions him!). The situation with the 'Droch Lord' and his little minions really adds an eerie aura to the overall story! The sidestory with Threepio and Artoo reads like a Greek Tragedy in many respects: they are hijacked, they miss making contact with Han Solo by mere seconds, they are lost in the galaxy going from plague-infested location to plague-infested location, and then to top it all off they run in to Daala! All they were trying to do was to help! It was intriguing to consider what a Jedi Hutt would be like and to see the 'fallen' Taselda trying to maintain some vestige of power that she no longer had. I thought the political intrigue and manipulation was well written also. The most unbelievable aspect involved Luke: after all the months of searching, after everyone telling him to let Callista go, after almost dying on a planet just trying to land so that he could continue searching, all it took was one night with Liegus to make him suddenly realize that he had to let her go. Not quite the stunning insight and wisdom I would expect from a Jedi Master!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2002

    Only bad Star Wars book

    The plot was less than thin. The book was slow and boring. This was a short story that was stretched into a novel. I can't believe that this book was printed with the Star Wars name on it.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2000

    This was allowed to be printed?

    It was (besides boring) complicated and made no sense. The characters weren't badly portrayed but the plot was terrible and I couldn't visualize the scenes. This was not one of the better Star Wars books. Darksaber was much better even though it was a continuation of Babara Hambly's book.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2000

    Planet of Twilight more like Planet of Mediocrity

    Hambly does it again. She manages to write a less than thrilling novel once more. This was probably the second poorest Star Wars novel I have read, right behind The Truce at Bakura. I enjoyed the Force using, light saber wielding Hutt but the rest of the story was cumbersome and slow. Not one of the brightest stars in the collection of Star Wars novels. This is another one of those books that you should read but only after you have read the many, much better stories that are out there.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2000

    This Book is Downright Awesome

    This Star Wars book helps add to the saga of Star Wars and only a person who hasn't been hooked on Star Wars since the first movie wouldn't enjoy everyone else would love it!!!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2012

    What

    What is the LIFE FORM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2011

    somewhat disappointing

    Was disappointed not more use of the force (or lightsaber use) in this book. They were actually on a planet where Luke avoided using it, and Leia is too new at it. I expect not much force use in x-wing series, but a book with Luke and Leia, I expected much more. The storyline got kinda gross at times for me. Overall, a good book to end the trilogy, just to know what happened, but nothing spectacular.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2007

    this book was okay its pretty hard to follow

    i tryed reading this book in one sitting but it was too hard so i gave my copy of the book to the fires of endor and let it roast in the fire

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2002

    Planet of Twilight worst of 3

    I feel that Planet of Twilight was the worst of the trilogy. It was just a bunch of talk through the whole book and it was hard to follow.But the romance between Luke and Callista keeps the story going. Overall its okay.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2001

    Just guessing

    I have never read this book but judging by hambly's last book i guess this book is also pretty good, about luke trying to find callista and leia getting kidnapped. i would just like to know how many years after Return of the jedi this movie takes place. Whoever reads this review, please make another review letting me know.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2010

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