Star Wars: Dawn of the Jedi: Into the Void

( 40 )

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On the planet Tython, the ancient Je’daii order was founded. And at the feet of its wise Masters, Lanoree Brock learned the mysteries and methods of the Force—and found her calling as one of its most powerful disciples. But as strongly as the Force flowed within Lanoree and her parents, it remained absent in her brother, who grew to despise and shun the Je’daii, and whose training in ...

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Into the Void: Star Wars (Dawn of the Jedi)

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Overview

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

On the planet Tython, the ancient Je’daii order was founded. And at the feet of its wise Masters, Lanoree Brock learned the mysteries and methods of the Force—and found her calling as one of its most powerful disciples. But as strongly as the Force flowed within Lanoree and her parents, it remained absent in her brother, who grew to despise and shun the Je’daii, and whose training in its ancient ways ended in tragedy.
 
Now, from her solitary life as a Ranger keeping order across the galaxy, Lanoree has been summoned by the Je’daii Council on a matter of utmost urgency. The leader of a fanatical cult, obsessed with traveling beyond the reaches of known space, is bent on opening a cosmic gateway using dreaded dark matter as the key—risking a cataclysmic reaction that will consume the entire star system. But more shocking to Lanoree than even the prospect of total galactic annihilation, is the decision of her Je’daii Masters to task her with the mission of preventing it. Until a staggering revelation makes clear why she was chosen: The brilliant, dangerous madman she must track down and stop at any cost is the brother whose death she has long grieved—and whose life she must now fear.

Includes a special, full-color excerpt from the Dark Horse comic Star Wars: Dawn of the Jedi and an original Dawn of the Jedi short story by John Ostrander!

Praise for Into the Void
 
“In a story filled with adventure, intrigue, and great quotes, there’s a lot to like in this book. Tim Lebbon dives into his very first Star Wars story with a great deal of success. He manages to spin a tale that feels like Star Wars, but also feels different from other stories that have been told before. While there is some threat of system wide destruction, the point is never pushed to being ridiculous. The characters feel believable and provoke interest. The attention to the characters never takes away from the plot. There’s also a remarkable balance between world building, plot and character development, and action. When it comes down to it, Dawn of the Jedi: Into the Void is just great storytelling.”—Roqoo Depot
 
“A nice, compact Star Wars tale that both acts as an introduction to the Dawn of the Jedi period and a standalone story.”—Club Jade
 
“A solidly enjoyable read . . . a nice addition to the Expanded Universe.”—Tosche Station
 
“A good solid Star Wars adventure story with heart.”—Knights’ Archive

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Thousands of years before Luke Skywalker and Darth Vader, the precursors of the Jedi on the planet Tython shared the primordial secrets and mysteries of the Force. Soaking up their wisdom were youthful Lanoree Brock and her parents. The young ranger is surprised when the Je'daii Council summon her on an urgent mission, but she is even more astonished when she learns that the cause of their call is the threat posed by her madman brother, who she had assumed was long dead. A stunning stand-alone hardcover tie-in to the successful comic book series. Headed for bestseller lists.

From the Publisher
“In a story filled with adventure, intrigue, and great quotes, there’s a lot to like in this book. Tim Lebbon dives into his very first Star Wars story with a great deal of success. He manages to spin a tale that feels like Star Wars, but also feels different from other stories that have been told before. While there is some threat of system wide destruction, the point is never pushed to being ridiculous. The characters feel believable and provoke interest. The attention to the characters never takes away from the plot. There’s also a remarkable balance between world building, plot and character development, and action. When it comes down to it, Dawn of the Jedi: Into the Void is just great storytelling.”—Roqoo Depot
 
“A nice, compact Star Wars tale that both acts as an introduction to the Dawn of the Jedi period and a standalone story.”—Club Jade
 
“A solidly enjoyable read . . . a nice addition to the Expanded Universe.”—Tosche Station
 
“A good solid Star Wars adventure story with heart.”—Knights’ Archive
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780345541932
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 5/7/2013
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 193,274
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Tim Lebbon is a New York Times bestselling writer whose recent books include The Secret Journeys of Jack London series (co-authored with Christopher Golden), Echo City, The Island, and Bar None. He has won four British Fantasy Awards, a Bram Stoker Award, and a Scribe Award, and has been a finalist for International Horror Guild, Shirley Jackson, and World Fantasy awards.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

dark matters

Even at the beginning of our journey I feel like a rock in the river of the Force. Lanoree is a fish carried by that river, feeding from it, living within it, relying on the waters for her well-­being. But I am unmoving. An inconvenience to the water as long as I remain. And slowly, slowly, I am being eroded to nothing.

—­Dalien Brock, diaries, 10,661 TYA

She is a little girl, the sky seems wide and endless, and Lanoree Brock breathes in the wonders of Tython as she runs to find her brother.

Dalien is down by the estuary again. He likes being alone, away from all the other children at Bodhi, the Je’daii Temple of the Arts. Her parents have sent her to find him, and though they still have some teaching to do that afternoon, they’ve promised that they will walk up to the boundary of the Edge Forest that evening. Lanoree loves it up there. And it scares her a little, as well. Close to the temple, near the sea, she can feel the Force ebbing and flowing through everything—­the air she breathes, the sights she sees, and all that makes up the beautiful scenery. Up at the Edge Forest, there’s a primal wildness to the Force that sets her blood pumping.

Her mother will smile and say that she will learn about it all, given time. Her father will look silently into the forest, as if he silently yearns to explore that way. And her little brother, only nine years old, will start to cry.

Always at the Edge Forest, he cries.

“Dal!” She swishes through the long grasses close to the riverbank, hands held out by her sides so that the grass caresses her palms. She won’t tell him about the walk planned for that evening. If she does he’ll get moody, and he might not agree to come home with her. He can be like that sometimes, and their father says it’s the sign of someone finding his own way.

Dal doesn’t seem to have heard her, and as she closes on him she slows from a run to a walk and thinks, If that was me I’d have sensed me approaching ages ago.

Dal’s head remains dipped. By his side he has created a perfect circle using the stones of chewed mepples, his favorite fruit. He does that when he’s thinking.

The river flows by, fast and full from the recent rains. There’s a power to it that is intimidating, and, closing her eyes, Lanoree feels the Force and senses the myriad life-­forms that call the river home. Some are as small as her finger, others that swim upriver from the ocean almost half the size of a Cloud Chaser ship. She knows from her studies that many of them have teeth.

She bites her lip, hesitant. Then she probes out with her mind and—­

“I told you to never do that to me!”

“Dal . . .”

He stands and turns around, and he looks furious. Just for a moment there’s a fire in his eyes that she doesn’t like. She has seen those flames before, and carries the knotted scar tissue in her lower lip to prove it. Then his anger slips and he smiles.

“Sorry. You startled me, that’s all.”

“You’re drawing?” she asks, seeing the sketchbook.

Dal closes the book. “It’s rubbish.”

“I don’t believe that,” Lanoree says. “You’re really good. Temple Master Fenn himself says so.”

“Temple Master Fenn is a friend of Father’s.”

Lanoree ignores the insinuation and walks closer to her brother. She can already see that he has chosen a fine place from which to draw the surroundings. The river curves here, and a smaller tributary joins from the hills of the Edge Forest, causing a confusion of currents. The undergrowth on the far bank is colorful and vibrant, and there’s a huge old ak tree whose hollowed trunk is home to a flight of weave birds. Their spun golden threads glisten in the afternoon sun. The birdsong complements the river’s roar.

“Let me see,” Lanoree says.

Dal does not look at her, but he opens the pad.

“It’s beautiful,” she says. “The Force has guided your fingers, Dal.” But she’s not sure.

Dal picks a heavy pencil from his pocket and strikes five thick lines through his drawing, left to right, tearing the paper and ruining it forever. His expression does not change, and neither does his breathing. It’s almost as if there is no anger at all.

“There,” he says. “That’s better.”

For a moment the lines look like claw marks, and as Lanoree takes a breath and blinks—­

A soft, insistent alarm pulled her up from sleep. Lanoree sighed and sat up, rubbing her eyes, massaging the dream away. Dear Dal. She dreamed of him often, but they were usually dreams of those later times when everything was turning bad. Not when they were still children for whom Tython was so full of potential.

Perhaps it was because she was on her way home.

She had not been back to Tython for more than four years. She was a Je’daii Ranger, and so ranging is what she did. Some Rangers found reasons to return to Tython regularly. Family connections, continuous training, face-­to-­face debriefs, it all amounted to the same thing—­they hated being away from home. She also believed that there were those Je’daii who felt the need to immerse themselves in Tython’s Force-­rich surroundings from time to time, as if uncertain that their affinity with the Force was strong enough.

Lanoree had no such doubts. She was comfortable with her strength and balance in the Force. The short periods she had spent with others on retreats on Ashla and Bogan—­a voluntary part of a Padawan’s training, should they desire to go—­had made her even more confident in this.

She stood from her cot and stretched. She reached for the ceiling and grabbed the bars she’d welded there herself, pulling up, breathing softly, then lifting her legs and stretching them out until she was horizontal to the floor. Her muscles quivered, and she breathed deeply as she felt the Force flowing through her, a vibrant, living thing. Mental exercise and meditation were fine, but sometimes she took the greatest pleasure in exerting herself physically. She believed that to be strong with the Force, one had to be strong in body.

The alarm was still ringing.

“I’m awake,” she said, easing herself slowly back to the floor, “in case you hadn’t noticed.”

The alarm snapped off, and her Peacemaker ship’s grubby yellow maintenance droid ambled into the small living quarters on padded metal feet. It was one of many adaptations she’d made to the ship in her years out in the Tythan system. Most Peacemakers carried a very simple droid, but she’d updated hers to a Holgorian IM-­220, capable of limited communication with a human master and other duties not necessarily exclusive to ship maintenance. She’d further customized it with some heavy armor, doubling its weight but making it much more useful to her in risky scenarios. She spoke to it, its replies were obtuse, and she supposed it was the equivalent of trying to communicate with a grass kapir back home. She had even named it.

“Hey, Ironholgs. You better not have woken me early.”

The droid beeped and scraped, and she wasn’t sure whether it was getting cranky in its old age.

She looked around the small but comfortable living quarters. She had chosen a Peacemaker over a Hunter because of its size; even before she’d flown her first mission as a Je’daii Ranger, she knew that she would be eager to spend much of her time in space. A Hunter was fast and agile but too small to live in. The Peacemaker was a compromise on maneuverability, but she had spent long periods living alone on the ship. She preferred it that way.

And like most Rangers, she had made many modifications and adaptations to her ship that stamped her own identity upon it. She’d stripped out the table and chairs and replaced them with a weights and tensions rack for working out. Now, she ate her food sitting on her narrow cot. She’d replaced the holonet entertainment system with an older flatscreen, which doubled as communications center and reduced the ship’s net weight. Beside the extensive engine compartment there had been a small room that housed a second cot for guests or companions, but because she had neither she had filled the space with extra laser charge pods, a water recycling unit, and food stores. The ship’s four laser cannon turrets had also been upgraded, and it now also carried plasma missiles, and drone missiles for long-distance combat. At the hands of the Cathar master armorer Gan Corla, the cannons now packed three times more punch and were effective over twice the range as those standard to Peacemakers.

She had also altered and adapted the function and position of many cockpit controls, making it so that only she could effectively fly the ship. It was hers, it was home, and that was how she liked it.

“How long to Tython?” she asked.

The droid let out a series of whines and clicks.

“Right,” Lanoree said. “Suppose I’d better freshen up.” She brushed a touch pad and the darkened screens in the forward cockpit faded to clear, revealing the star-­speckled view that never failed to make her heart ache. There was something so profoundly moving to the distance and scale of what she saw out there, and the Force never let her forget that she was a part of something incomprehensibly large. She supposed it was as close as she ever came to a religious epiphany.

She touched the pad again and a red glow appeared, surrounding a speck in the distance. Tython. Three hours and she’d be there.

The Je’daii Council ordering her back to Tython meant only one thing. They had a mission for her, and it was one that they needed to discuss face-­to-­face.

***

Washed, dressed, and fed, Lanoree sat in the ship’s cockpit and watched Tython drawing closer. Her ship had communicated with sentry drones orbiting at thirty thousand kilometers, and now the Peacemaker was performing a graceful parabola that would take it down into the atmosphere just above the equator.

She was nervous about visiting Tython again, but part of her was excited as well. It would be good to see her mother and father, however briefly. She contacted them far too infrequently. With Dal dead, she was now their only child.

A soft chime announced an incoming transmission. She swiveled her seat and faced the flatscreen, just as it snowed into an image.

“Master Dam-­Powl,” Lanoree said, surprised. “An honor.” And it was. She had expected the welcoming transmission to be from a Je’daii Ranger or perhaps even a Journeyer she did not know. Not the Cathar Je’daii Master.

Dam-­Powl bowed her head. “Lanoree, it’s good to see you again. We’ve been eagerly awaiting your arrival. Pressing matters beg discussion. Dark matters.”

“I assumed that was the case,” Lanoree said. She shifted in her seat, unaccountably nervous.

“I sense your discomfort,” Master Dam-­Powl said.

“Forgive me. It’s been some time since I spoke with a Je’daii Master.”

“You feel unsettled even with me?” Dam-­Powl asked, smiling. But the smile quickly slipped. “No matter. Prepare yourself, because today you speak with six Masters, including Stav Kesh’s Temple Master Lha-­Mi. I’ve sent your ship the landing coordinates for our meeting place thirty kilometers south of Akar Kesh. We’ll expect you soon.”

“Master, we’re not meeting at a temple?”

But Dam-­Powl had already broken the transmission, and Lanoree was left staring at a blank screen. She could see her image reflected there, and she quickly gathered herself, breathing away the shock. Six Je’daii Masters? And Lha-­Mi as well?

“Then it is something big.”

She checked the transmitted coordinates and switched the flight computer to manual, eager to make the final approach herself. She had always loved flying and the freedom it gave her. Untethered. Almost a free agent.

Lanoree closed her eyes briefly and breathed with the Force. It was strong this close to Tython, elemental, and it sparked her senses alive.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 40 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(13)

4 Star

(10)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(7)

1 Star

(4)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 40 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 12, 2013

    I have to start this review with a disclaimer: I know next to no

    I have to start this review with a disclaimer: I know next to nothing about Star Wars, and it’s universe. I’ve never seen the movies, never read any of the other books – I know only as much as you pick up through living in this society with all the references and quotes out there.

    That gave me a unique starting place to read this book from, and underscored the reasons I was interested reviewing it. To be able to “start at the beginning” for one thing, and secondly, to come at this work looking at it in its own merits, without the weight of “canon” or the full story coming behind me, as I’m sure many other reviewers will expound on.

    Vivid. First and foremost, this work is vivid. I could see and understand everything the author was trying to show me in the worlds we were walking through. I saw and believed each species: I could see the height differences, the temperaments, the interactions of different backgrounds in the “melting pot” of the temples the characters travelled to. I was immersed in the environments brought before me, from the Great Journey over rivers, mountains, and desert, to riding in the customized ship through space. The air on Nox stung, and the strange pressures of the Chasm flooded out of the pages. Through all of these well-crafted images and sensations, my “suspension of disbelief” was complete. I was ready to hear and accept the story, and it did not disappoint.

    I believed and mourned the downward decline of a brother who didn’t fit his family’s expectations. I understood the mentality of the sister who was trying to fight back against losing him. The split chapters between present day and flashback were done extremely well. I especially enjoyed the fact that the flashback was written in a completely different tense, so it added distinction, and gave it a bit more mystery than normal flashback scenes I have seen. The split story was also gripping. The reader knows what is going to happen, where it is going to end, but it still twists and turns, taking you by surprise, and keeping you engaged. There were no “throw-away” scenes, thoughts, or moments. I was never bored, or feeling like I had to push through a section to get back to the main plot. Everything intertwined perfectly.

    My only argument with the book comes at a character-creation level, something the developmental editor in me loves to grab onto. I want to know WHY your character would act a certain way. Can you justify it? Can you justify it if they have not acted in such a manner at all until this point? Give me a believable reason, pass it along to the rest of your readers, and you will have an amazing story. That said, here is my question. Lanoree walks through a teeming market, noting the differing races, and remarking on some that are in the middle of religious rites. They are of a different belief from her, but she passes by them with a measure of respect, even though she does not agree. Her adult role is of mediator, of understanding both sides, and acting in the best interest of the worlds as a whole. As a child, she did not yet have this training, this outlook on those around her, and thus pushed her brother to accept her way. It was done in love, as she, overall, wanted the best for him, but she could not see his side. When she meets up with him again, she pauses, curious and contemplative, for a moment almost seeming like she wishes to use her new skills to reach a resolution. But the order from the Je’daii overrules, and she resorts to the same brash force she used back when they were children to get her point across.

    Why would she be so open to allowing other species their beliefs that she didn’t agree with, but couldn’t allow her brother the same courtesy? And if it all boils down to the imminent danger of self-implosion, why did she not use her prowess as negotiator to try to touch her brother’s heart? To show him she could now allow for other sides of the argument, as long as it was for the greater good?

    These questions are neither here nor there, but they are something to keep in mind for other writers out there. I greatly enjoyed this book, and I fully recommend it! I see Mr. Lebbon’s prowess in the writing craft as something others can learn from, but I would ask those writers to keep in mind, your reader will care about the characters you introduce them to – make sure maintain consistency, or it will frustrate them.

    I received a review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 2, 2013

    This book was a fun and easy read. Although I wouldn't rate it

    This book was a fun and easy read. Although I wouldn't rate it as exceptional, it is a welcome addition to the Star Wars universe. Lanoree Brock is an interesting character. I would like to see her develop through additional stories. Keep in mind that this book covers events that takes place 20,000-plus years prior to anything else that has thus far been chronicled for Star Wars. It's worth the read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 30, 2013

    In high school I read nearly every Star Wars book ever written,

    In high school I read nearly every Star Wars book ever written, and I have great memories of Jedi adventures across the universe. Every now and then — particularly when I am in need of some easy fiction reading — I like to pick up one of the new Star Wars titles. I was given a free digital copy of Into the Void in exchange for an honest review, and I jumped at the chance.

    Into the Void focuses on the beginnings of the Jedi, to their historic roots. In fact, the few force-sensitive individuals in this book are actually called Je’daii, and they are far less concerned with clinging to the light side than their later descendants. The Je’daii look to walk a balance between light and dark, keeping a healthy tension, whereas the Jedi most of us know were ultimately concerned with never straying anywhere near the dark.

    Additionally, the Je’daii are unique in that they don’t yet have lightsaber technology. Although there are some hints of force crystals and the beginnings of lightsaber tech, the Je’daii use regular swords. Those swords can absorb and deflect some laser bolts, much like a lightsaber, but it took adjusting to accustom myself to reading about a Je’daii carrying a gleaming metal sword.

    In Into the Void Lanoree Brock is the protagonist, tasked with tracking down her brother, a mysterious possible villain who turned his back on the Force he despised. The brother-sister relationship carries good potential, but Lanoree never becomes a captivating hero. Her character lacks depth, and the author spends more time focusing on Lanoree’s history with her brother than on Lanoree as a person. I kept wishing I’d see more complexity in Lanoree’s thoughts and words, but she was frustratingly simple.

    The action was very well-written and compelling, but the character development was more frustrating and less complete than in other Star Wars novels. I recommend this book to Star Wars fans who want to ponder the beginnings of the Force and the Jedi, but I wouldn’t suggest this book to budding Star Wars readers, as there are many better novels to begin with.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2013

    Not great, but good.

    Two stories mixed together at what seems to be random. Not well written but entertaining enough to finish. Was expecting more.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2013

    Good if you are new to star wars

    To date i have read all the star wars books. So this book a disappointment as basically being two short stories and exerpts of earlier published books. Came across like sn expensive ad.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2013

    I didn't like it. It felt more like 2 short stories or novellas

    I didn't like it. It felt more like 2 short stories or novellas with weak plots that were shuffled together like a deck of cards. It's too bad because it had potential.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2014

    I'm a huge Star Wars nerd and I like the Dawn of the Jedi comic,

    I'm a huge Star Wars nerd and I like the Dawn of the Jedi comic, but I really struggled to get through this book unfortunately. It basically has nothing to do with the comic series aside from the setting and I just could not get into the story or the characters at all.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2014

    Incredibly disappointing read. It's not about the dawn of the J

    Incredibly disappointing read. It's not about the dawn of the Jedi, but the dawn of light speed. This story could have been so much better had it been written by an author with more imagination. Drew Karpyshyn would have been golden for this one. I suggest skipping this one if you're not new to the SW Universe. Trust me, you won't miss much.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2014

    Very good read, I Highly Recommend it.

    It kept my interest and I highly enjoyed it. Can't wait until the next book in this series is released.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2014

    If it wasn't for Star Wars in the title you would almost never know

    I never thought I would find a Star Wars book I didn't like but I finaly did. It was hard for me to read this book, it just did not engage me the way it should have. You could have just as easily written this as a generic sci fi novel and it probably would have been a better read, and thst is just a crying shame.

    I had fairly high hopes for this book, here we have a whole 20000 years before A New Hope and the mythos that birthed the Jedi order. And I honestly have never been so dissapointed. This book had such huge potential to open up a previously untaped resource of history and good versus evil and it just turned into a typical soap opera sci fi drama between brother and sister.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2014

    Will someone lend it to me

    I am broke and need entirtainment

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 29, 2013

    This book was awful. I was hoping to start reading Star Wars fro

    This book was awful. I was hoping to start reading Star Wars from the beginning of the Jedi Order but this is a completely irrelevant and poorly written beginning. The book is 400 pages, but actually ends on the 298th page and the rest are excerpts from other Star Wars books. The writing was poor and spliced together two short stories that could have had some really promising elements if the author had any sort of imagination. The fact that this author wrote a book that became a New York Times Bestseller astounds me. Skip this book! There is no reason to read it and ten reasons not to.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2013

    On the whole I really enjoyed the book and the story that was to

    On the whole I really enjoyed the book and the story that was told.  The dual-stories intertwined well and made for an engaging narrative.  The writing style is a little different from others and can take some getting used to, but the story is strong enough to carry it through.  




    I enjoyed the story, but in the grand scheme of all things Star Wars, I didn't enjoy it all that much.  Taken by itself, it's a pretty fun read, but doesn't really mesh in the overall mythos.  The idea that this takes place 10,000 years before everything else is just odd because all of the technology remains essentially the same.  The races are the same and the ideals are almost the same as well.  When you think about it, that basically means there's been no evolution of technology or species between this story and the other Star Wars tales. 




    It's a fun story, I just wish the time frame for it were a little different.  It's worth reading, but I'd take it more as a side tale and nothing more. 

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  • Posted July 5, 2013

    a long time ago strikes again

    Star Wars for over forty years has woven tales that are a great read for young and old.
    Dawn of the Jedi fills in a tale long before Luke Skywalker and Obi-wan Kenobi and yet fits in nicely. as a long time Star Wars fan Dawn is a great read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2013

    into the void

    A nice begining to a great universe this book leads right into the comic book series and has a nice short story at The end as well :) by john ostrander so a must read for any star Wars fan.

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  • Posted June 21, 2013

    Just one question: When's the next one coming out?

    Just one question: When's the next one coming out?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2013

    You have to read it to see my comment

    Pie.... IT IS EPIC

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 10, 2013

    Into the void: Star Wars (dawn of the Jedi) Lanoree is strong in

    Into the void: Star Wars (dawn of the Jedi)
    Lanoree is strong in the force, but she is set on the journey to learn and test her ability to keep her balance in the force. This is the beginning of the Star Wars Jedi saga, when the force was a balance, and the Je’daii are different in many ways. They are scientist, they are explores they are artist like her parents. They are sent to various temples to explore their interests, find their calling and taught balance in the force. But Lanoree’s brother is different, Dal feels separate from his family, he does not feel a calling but a rejection from the force. This only causes problems as the siblings face their challenges. Lanoree who is strong with the force feels that her brother has abandoned her. When he is exhaled from the temple for endangering others she begins to feel a relief of the burden of helping him. Only to find his bloody clothing on the river bank, and have to return home to tell her parents. But this is only the beginning of this strange and mystical tale, with many plot twists and turns, the siblings will face each other again, and change the universe by their conflict. 

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  • Posted June 9, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    The story was okay only if you did not expect too much from it.

    The story was okay only if you did not expect too much from it. I thought that a Star Wars story without lightsabers and light speed would be an interesting apprach, but I was mistaken. You get the different aliens from the Star Wars Universe, but there is no chance for an exciting ligtsaber duel, ships jumping in and out of hyperspace, or any sign or reference to familiar characters that everyone could identitfy with. There are plenty of Star Wars stories out there that are better than this one.

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  • Posted June 7, 2013

    EXcellennt

    It's nice to finally hear it from it's roots.

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