Starch Blocker Diet

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Are high-carbohydrate, starchy foods -- breads, pasta, potatoes -- your dietary downfall? Here's a program that's almost sinfully satisfying but low in calories, a new medical strategy based on thirty years of clinical testing that helps people lose weight without giving up their favorite foods.

The anti-carb revolution that's sweeping America has finally found a sane solution. A recently discovered natural substance derived from legumes instantly eliminates most of the calories...

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0060548231 BRAND NEW. We are a tested and proven company with over 900,000 satisfied customers since 1997. We ship daily M-F. Choose expedited shipping (if available) for much ... faster delivery. Delivery confirmation on all US orders. Read more Show Less

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2003 Hardcover Stated First Edition New in New dust jacket; New but with remainder mark and slight shelf wear. 0060548231. 1.25 x 9.25 x 6.15; 366 pages; The Starch Blocker Diet ... written by Steven Rosenblatt and Cameron Stauth takes from research on alpha amylase, an enzyme (produced by the pancreas) which breaks down tarches into simple sugars. The book proposes that by taking a starch blocker before a meal, you can actually eat the usual carbohydrates without converting them into sugars and thus, calories. Alpha amylase blocker research began in the 1970's with Howard Hughes' research company. Later, extensive research was done at the Mayo Clinic, not for weight loss but for diabetes management. Various preparations of alpha amylase inhibitors were tried and the more recent ones contain Phaseolamin 2250 taken from small kidney beans. The book will be attractive to dieters who crave carbohydrates as it allows normal or even high carbohydrate intake. Read more Show Less

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Overview

Are high-carbohydrate, starchy foods -- breads, pasta, potatoes -- your dietary downfall? Here's a program that's almost sinfully satisfying but low in calories, a new medical strategy based on thirty years of clinical testing that helps people lose weight without giving up their favorite foods.

The anti-carb revolution that's sweeping America has finally found a sane solution. A recently discovered natural substance derived from legumes instantly eliminates most of the calories in starchy foods, giving you a huge caloric reduction and an effective fat-burning metabolism. No more denial diets! Using the groundbreaking information in this book, you can lose weight without hunger for the first time in your life.

The calorie-neutralizing substance known as Phase 2 binds with the enzyme that digests starch, so when you take it just before meals, most starch, similar to fiber, passes through your system without releasing calories. There are no side effects, but a huge benefit: up to 1/3 of your total daily calories are instantly eliminated! The Starch Blocker Diet provides a simple, three-step program for achieving safe, lasting weight loss:

Step 1: Redistributing Calories
You'll actually eat more starchy foods -- to maximize the power of this new way to lose weight!

Step 2: Taking Emotional Control
This program helps you regain power over food by stopping cravings and improving mood chemistry.

Step 3: Burning Body Fat with Supercharged Exercise
When starch calories are neutralized, you burn body fat faster, so exercise has a heightened fat-loss effect.



This no-hunger, nondenial strategy lets you eat a richlysatisfying diet while still losing weight. You'll find formulas for individualizing the program to fit your own caloric and lifestyle requirements, a unique starch calorie chart, detailed scientific data, sample menus, and more than 100 delicious, high-starch recipes, many by James Beard Award-winning chef Philippe Boulot.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060548230
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/29/2003
  • Edition description: 1ST
  • Pages: 354
  • Product dimensions: 6.42 (w) x 9.24 (h) x 1.17 (d)

First Chapter

The Starch Blocker Diet

Chapter One

Beyond Denial Diets

I was facing the kind of day that would once have broken my heart. I was scheduled to see three patients who all had the same problem, one that medical science has long struggled unsuccessfully to solve. As recently as a year ago, a day like this would have left me in despair. My greatest source of pain as a doctor.the greatest pain of almost all doctors.is knowing the solution to a problem, but being unable to enact it. My three patients had a problem that has always been one of those frustrating, intractable conditions that seems as if it should be solvable, but usually isn't: weight control.

For many years, I have known the solution. Virtually everyone knows it: Eat fewer calories. But how do you achieve this, in the real world, with real people, day after day, year after year? That is the question that no doctor, until recently, has been able to adequately answer.

Sure, there are dozens of aggressive low-calorie, low-carbohydrate, low-fat diets, some of them quite capable of inducing weight loss.if people can stay on them. But who can? Apparently, not many of us, since obesity has doubled in the past twenty years, and morbid obesity has quadrupled, with most of that increase coming in just the last decade. About 33% of all American people are currently obese, and 61% are at least overweight. Even 40% of children are overweight or obese. That's 150 million people.a horrifying public health catastrophe.

All of the existing diets that have failed to stop this epidemic have different advantages. Some more effectively provide sufficient nutrients, and others are better at keeping the cardiovascular system free of fats. A few excel at controlling key metabolic factors, such as insulin output. However, they all run headlong into the same oppressive problem: hunger.

Hunger overcomes the weight management motivations of even extremely strong-willed people. It's an almost irresistible primal force that people have been programmed over the course of a million years of evolution to hate.even to fear. It's a relentless emptiness that strikes not just the body but also the brain, which requires 25% of all calories consumed by adults, and up to 50% of all calories consumed by children.

Hunger whispers a primeval message to the brain and the body that starvation is lurking, and that eating is absolutely necessary now. It makes people feel weak, ravenous, irritable.and desperate.

Physical hunger is a terribly invasive force, but it's not the only kind of hunger that dieters have long been unable to endure. There is also a strong psychological aspect to hunger.We are not only neurologically programmed to hate and fear hunger, but we are also conditioned by evolutionary forces to crave and appreciate the exquisite tastes of various foods, and to desire these foods as a central part of our enjoyment of life.

Food, after all, is far more than just calories. Food is, in fact, the veritable essence and elixir of life.the sustaining, nurturing product of our earth, air, sun, and water. It is simply human nature to desire it.

Thus, there is a missing element in virtually all current weight control diets, which are effective only when desired foods are denied. That element is the human element.

If human beings were machines, weight control would be easy. We would all simply consume the exact number of calories we need, and then flip a switch to turn consumption off. But we're not machines.We are finite beings, full of feelings, destined eventually to die, but determined to live a little first, and to savor the joys of our senses during our stay on this earth.

Thus, human nature itself is the primary reason 90% of all weight loss diets fail. People just can't.or won't.hold out indefinitely against the physical and psychological onslaught of hunger. So they eat.

Throughout almost all of our million-year human history, this natural desire to eat a rich and varied diet caused only occasional problems, because the vast majority of people were very physically active. As recently as the early 1900s, most people were vigorously active five to ten hours each day. Forty percent of all people lived on farms then, and 80% of all farmwork was done with human labor. Most non-farmworkers did manual work in factories and shops. Even people who did nonphysical work usually walked to their jobs and did heavy chores at home.

This, of course, has changed. Technology has freed most of us from hard labor, but it has imprisoned us within lifestyles that are more conducive to fatness than fitness. This is our reward for progress.and our punishment.

Despite these changes in our lifestyles, though, we are still strongly influenced by powerful urges that have existed since antiquity, exhorting us to eat a pleasurable and satisfying diet.

As a result, eating habits that were once the norm are now considered pathological. People who eat only slightly too much, over a long period of time, now frequently become so overweight that they are labeled as gluttons.

Despite these powerful evolutionary forces, most people try extremely hard to match their caloric intake with their energy needs, and they sacrifice bravely to shed extra pounds. For months and even years at a time, they wage war against their own natural appetites. However, as time wears on, and physical and psychological hunger make every passing day more difficult, only about 10% of all people.the strongest of the strong.endure. The rest just can't hold out.

When the holdout is over, most people gain significantly more weight than they had lost, because the "starvation effect" caused by low-calorie dieting triggers caloric hoarding, causing an apple to become almost as fattening as a piece of apple pie once was. In addition, denial-based diets wreak havoc upon the hormones that control hunger and satiety, such as grhelin and leptin, making hunger more intense and more frequent than ever before.

Causing hunger, though, isn't the only major shortcoming of even the best of the conventional denial-based diets. Denial diets.which means virtually all existing weight-loss diets.also have these destructive liabilities:

Low-calorie diets often forsake necessary nutrients, most notably protein. When not enough dietary protein is available, the body begins to digest its own protein-packed muscles for energy and nutrients. Micronutrients are also commonly neglected, including those that help break down fat (such as the omega-3 oils), and those that help stabilize blood sugar and control hunger (such as chromium). These nutritional shortfalls debilitate the body and cause food cravings.

Low-carbohydrate diets often compensate for carbohydrate-avoidance with excess intake of high-triglyceride fats and dietary proteins, which can harm the cardiovascular system, kidneys, liver, gallbladder, and other organs.High-fat foods, of course, can also be fattening.

Low-fat diets are usually too high in carbohydrates. This causes excessive insulin production, which signals the body to store more energy as body fat. This extra insulin production also overworks the organs that manufacture insulin and can trigger the conditions that lead to diabetes.

Diets that rely on stimulants and appetite suppressants can cause serious damage. At least a hundred people have died recently from using the common herbal diet stimulant ephedra, and many other people have died from taking pharmaceutical diet pills. These diets are also notoriously ineffective for long-term weight management. Most existing diets are complicated, requiring careful measuring of calories and nutrient grams, purchase of special foods, and restriction of many restaurant foods.

In place of these stringent, unbalanced diets, what's long been needed is a rich, varied, satisfying nutritional program, dense in nutrients .but somehow moderate in calories. Sounds impossible, I know.

But, finally, it's not.

Even so, you may be thinking: So what if weight control is tough? What's the real harm to people? Just not looking good in jeans? Here's the harm: Obesity kills. Eating too much accounts for approximately 300,000 deaths per year.about seven times as many as auto accidents. It is the second-leading killer in modern American life, after smoking, and will be the leading killer by 2010, if current rates continue.

The process of obesity-related death isn't pretty. Often, before people die, they suffer the amputations of limbs due to weightrelated diabetes, or they become blind from that disease. Many others are left crippled from heart disease that was caused by overeating, or develop malignancies linked to dietary excess.

There's a terrible emotional toll, too. The lives of far too many people are devalued by others just because they're overweight. These people are mocked, humiliated, discriminated against, ignored, and held in contempt. Many are denied love. This is not out of the ordinary.

It is common.

Perhaps it has happened to you.

A New Medical Strategy

It had happened to my first patient of the day. Peggy was a lovely young woman, but over the past few years, after she'd become sedentary due to an auto injury, her weight had surged an extra 60 pounds, and was not easily accommodated on her five feet two frame. For the first time in her life, Peggy had become ashamed of herself. The way she was dressed -- in dark and baggy clothes -- seemed to say, "Don't look at me."

And she was scared. Diabetes ran rampant in her family, and my medical workup indicated that Peggy was, even at age 28, becoming vulnerable to its early onset.

"I need to go on a diet," she said softly, her eyes fixed on the floor. "I don't believe in weight-loss diets anymore."

Peggy sighed, deep and long, and I could almost hear the hope whoosh out of her.

"I have a new approach," I said. "But it's not a diet. It's a medical strategy, based on a new formulation."

"A pill? I won't take diet pills."

"This isn't a diet pill. It's a completely novel approach. It's a diet, but it's even more than that. It's a medical strategy. I think it's a brilliant one."

I told Peggy about starch blockers. Her face began to brighten.

The Starch Blocker Diet. Copyright © by Steven Rosenblatt. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2003

    yes, it really works. eat starch, block the calories.

    the only thing i wonder about is how this book stays on the shelves. maybe people subscribe a little too much to the adage, 'there's no magic pill,' that they simply don't believe this program could work for them.

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