Start & Run a Home Daycare / Edition 4

Start & Run a Home Daycare / Edition 4

by Catherine M. Pruissen
     
 

ISBN-10: 1551805693

ISBN-13: 9781551805696

Pub. Date: 11/28/2003

Publisher: Self-Counsel Press, Inc.

Child care is a much sought-after service today. If you love working with children and want to run your own business, a home daycare could be the perfect choice. Build a rewarding business working with children Design a successful operating plan Meet the licensing requirements Providing quality child care and making a profit isn’t child’s play. Caring

Overview

Child care is a much sought-after service today. If you love working with children and want to run your own business, a home daycare could be the perfect choice. Build a rewarding business working with children Design a successful operating plan Meet the licensing requirements Providing quality child care and making a profit isn’t child’s play. Caring for children is as challenging and multifaceted as parenting itself. In addition, you need to master record keeping, licensing requirements, and all other tasks associated with running a small business. This book, an international best seller, will help you get started right and keep your daycare running smoothly and successfully. It answers questions such as: How do I find out if there is a need for a daycare in my area? How do I get my daycare license? How much should I charge? What kind of policies should I set? What activities should I include in my daycare program? What equipment will I need? How do I gain and keep parents’ confidence? From deciding whether a home daycare is for you to planning healthy, appealing meals, from keeping the books to keeping the children happy, Start & Run a Home Daycare provides the information you need to build a thriving business caring for children. The companion CD-ROM which includes all the forms and worksheets from the book, in both MS Word and Adobe Reader (PDF) formats. It includes worksheets for everything including sample start-up budgets, rate schedules, even a parent handbook!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781551805696
Publisher:
Self-Counsel Press, Inc.
Publication date:
11/28/2003
Series:
Start & Run Business Series
Edition description:
Fourth Edition, Fourth edition
Pages:
232
Product dimensions:
8.39(w) x 10.01(h) x 0.45(d)

Table of Contents

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS xvii
INTRODUCTION xix
1 IS CHILD CARE FOR YOU? 1
1. The Entrepreneurial Spirit 1
2. The Business of Child Care 2
3. Why Daycare? 2
4. Evaluating Yourself and Your Situation 3
4.1 Step one: self-evaluation 3
4.2 Step two: family evaluation 6
4.3 Step three: situation evaluation 9
2 ASSESSING THE NEED FOR CHILD CARE 12
1. Determining Your Objectives 12
2. Creating a Questionnaire 13
3. Collecting the Data 13
3.1 Mailed questionnaires 13
3.2 Telephone interviews 13
3.3 In-person interviews 19
4. Estimating Costs 19
5. Analyzing Your Data 20
3 DAYCARE LICENSING 21
1. Group Size 22
2. Caregiver Qualifications 22
3. Program Outlines 23
4. Physical Environment 23
5. Health and Safety 24
6.Nutrition 25
CONTENTS
vii viii Start & run a home daycare
7. Parental Involvement 25
8. Administration (Operating Procedures) 25
9. Getting Your License 26
10. Unlicensed Daycare 27
4 SETTING UP SHOP 28
1. Legal Advice 28
1.1 Finding a lawyer 28
1.2 Your first meeting 28
1.3 Keeping legal costs down 29
1.4 The Child Care Law Center 29
2. Naming Your Business 29
3. Your Business Structure 30
3.1 Sole proprietorship 30
3.2 Partnership 31
3.3 Incorporation 31
4.Insurance 31
5. Your Project Log 33
5 MONEY MATTERS: YOUR START-UP AND OPERATING BUDGETS 37
1. Your Start-Up Costs 37
2. You Need Money — Where Can You Go? 42
2.1 Relatives and friends 42
2.2 Banks and other lending institutions 42
2.3 Government 44
3. Your Operating Budget 44
4. Estimating Income 44
5. Estimating Expenses 45
5.1 Food costs 45
5.2 Supply costs 45
5.3 Equipment replacement costs 48
6 SETTING YOUR RATES 54
1. Local Rate Standards 54
2. Your Expenses 55
Contents ix
3. Your Time 55
4. Your Quality of Care 55
5. Late Fees 58
6.Absenteeism 58
7. Holidays and Vacations 58
8. Rate Increases 58
9. Bad Accounts 59
10. The Rate Sheet 59
7 SETTING AND STATING POLICIES 63
1. What Age Group Will You Care For? 64
2. How Many Children Can You Accommodate? 66
3. How Will You Handle the Illness of a Child? 66
3.1 Communicable diseases 67
3.2 Administering medication 67
4. How Will You Organize Transportation and Field Trips? 67
5. What Kind of Behavior Management (Discipline) Will You Use? 68
6. What Kind of Supplies Will Parents Provide? 71
7. Who Will Act As Substitute Caregivers? 72
8. Who Will You Release the Child To? 72
9. How Will You Encourage Parental Participation? 73
10. What Are Your Emergency Procedures? 73
11. When Will You Provide Care? 74
12. What Meals Will You Provide? 74
13. Your Policy Statement 74
13.1 Purpose and philosophy statement 75
13.2 Trial period 82
13.3 Illness 82
13.4 Transportation and field trips 82
13.5 Behavior management 83
13.6 Supplies 83
13.7 Substitute caregivers 83
13.8 Releasing the child from care 83
13.9 Parent participation 84
x Start & run a home daycare
13.10 Emergencies 84
13.11 Meals 84
13.12 Child abuse 84
8 FINDING CUSTOMERS 85
1.Flyers 86
2. Bulletin Boards 88
3. Newspaper and Newsletter Advertising 88
4. Using the Yellow Pages 88
5. The Internet 89
6. Marketing By Association 90
7. Word-of-Mouth Advertising 90
8. Your Logo 91
9. Publicity 91
9.1 Radio bulletin boards 91
9.2 The news release 92
9.3 Keep it up 94
10. Referral Agencies 94
11. The Marketing Activity Sheet 95
9 THE NEW CUSTOMER 98
1. Handling Those Telephone Calls 98
2. The Personal Interview 99
3. The Information Package 102
10 PROGRAM PLANNING 106
1. What Children Need 106
2. Creating a Daily Schedule 108
3. Choosing Activities for a Child’s Development 108
4. Weekly Activity Chart 111
11 PLAY 119
1. What Are Learning Centers? 120
2. Housekeeping Center 120
3. Art Center 121
Contents xi
4. Construction Center 123
5. Quiet Center 124
6. Book Center 124
7. Sand and Water Center 125
8. Music Center 125
9. Other Centers 126
9.1 Math center 126
9.2 Science center 126
9.3 Camping center 126
9.4 Infant center 126
10. Outdoor Play 126
11. Staying Organized and Having Fun 128
12. Toy Libraries 129
13.Games 129
12 HEALTH AND SAFETY 131
1. Why Caregivers Have to Worry about “Little” Illnesses 131
2. Preventing the Spread of Germs 132
2.1 Hand washing 132
2.2 Diapering 133
2.3 After using the toilet 133
2.4 Food preparation 133
2.5 Other helpful hints 134
3.Immunization 134
4. Recognizing Communicable Diseases 134
5. Parent Communication 135
6. The Hazard Zone — Your Home 136
6.1 Falls 136
6.2 Poisoning 136
6.3Drowning 140
6.4Choking 140
6.5Burns 141
6.6 Motor vehicle accidents 141
6.7 Other dangers 141
xii Start & run a home daycare
7. Outdoor Safety 142
8. Fire Safety 145
13 NUTRITION 146
1. The Food Guide 146
2. Menu Planning 147
3.Mealtimes 149
4. Getting Children to Eat 149
5. Infant Feedings 151
6. Special Diets 152
14 CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS 153
1. Making the Decision to Care for Children with Special Needs 154
2. Handling the Issue with the Parents of Your Other Children 154
3. Readying Your Home 154
15 PARENTS: PARTNERS IN CHILD CARE 156
1. Starting Out on the Right Foot 156
2. Keep Them Involved 157
3. Problem Solving 158
16 KEEPING RECORDS 160
1. Financial Records 160
1.1 What is a business expense? 161
1.2 Expense records 162
1.3 Revenue records 162
1.4 Your business account 164
2. Child Records 165
3. Facility Records 165
4. Employee Records 165
17 CHILD ABUSE 173
1. Your Responsibility to Report Abuse 173
2. What Constitutes Abuse or Neglect? 174
2.1 Physical abuse 174
2.2 Sexual abuse 174
Contents xiii
2.3 Emotional abuse 174
2.4Neglect 174
3. Signs of Abuse or Neglect 174
4. The Abusive Parent 176
5. Reporting Abuse 176
6. Telling the Parents 178
18 FINDING AND HIRING EMPLOYEES 179
1. Writing a Job Description 179
2. Recruiting Employees 180
3. Interviewing Applicants 181
4. Trial Period 181
5. Benefits and Incentives 182
19 THE OUT-OF-HOME DAYCARE 184
1. What Kind of Daycare Do You Want to Operate? 184
2. Finding a Location 185
3. Legal Legwork 187
4. The Director of Your Center 188
5. Other Staff 189
20 CARING FOR THE CAREGIVER 192
1. Managing Your Limitations 193
2. Taking Time for You 193
3. Join a Caregiver Support Network 194
APPENDIXES
1. Government Offices 197
2. Child-Care Organizations and Associations 203
3. Internet Resources 204
xiv Start & run a home daycare
SAMPLES
1. Child-Care Needs Assessment Questionnaire 14
2. Cover Letter for Questionnaire 18
3. Food Cost Analysis 46
4. Supply Cost Analysis 49
5. Equipment Replacement Cost Analysis 51
6. Average Daycare Rates 57
7. Rate Sheet 61
8. Transportation Permission Form 69
9. Policy Statement 76
10. Flyer 87
11. News Release 93
12. Telephone Information Sheet 100
13. Child-Care Agreement 104
14. Daily Schedule 109
15. Weekly Activity Chart 118
16. Child Medical Form 137
17. Medication Permission Form 139
18. Weekly Menu 150
19. Monthly Expense Record 163
20. Expense Summary 164
21. Monthly Revenue Record 166
22. Child Information Sheet 167
23. Medication Administered Form 169
24. Accident, Injury, and Illness Report 170
25. Daily Information Sheet 171
TABLES
1. Child Development Chart 112
2. Activity Idea Charts 114
3. The Four Food Groups 148
4. Signs of Abuse or Neglect 175
5. Staff Responsibilities and Qualifications 191
Contents xv
WORKSHEETS
1. Child-Care Provider’s Self-Evaluation Quiz 4
2. Family Evaluation Quiz 7
3. Situation Evaluation Quiz 10
4. Project Log 34
5. Pricing Start-Up Equipment 40
6. Start-Up Budget 43
7. Food Cost Analysis 47
8. Supply Cost Analysis 50
9. Equipment Replacement Cost Analysis 52
10. Estimated Operating Budget 53
11. Average Daycare Rates 56
12. Writing a Purpose and Philosophy Statement 81
13. Marketing Activity Sheet 96
14. Safety Checklist 143
15. Location Checklist 186

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