Starting Out with Java 5: Control Structures to Objects / Edition 1

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2005 Trade paperback NEW. ISBN 1576761711. Exam Review Copy. New. No dust jacket as issued. NEW. ISBN 1576761711. Exam Review Copy. NEW. ISBN 1576761711. Exam Review Copy. NEW. ... ISBN 1576761711. Exam Review Copy. Read more Show Less

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Overview

This text is designed as a "late objects" introduction to programming using the Java programming language. This text first introduces the reader to the fundamentals of data types, input and output, control structures, methods, and objects created from standard library classes. After this the reader learns to write her own classes, and develop simple GUI applications. Then the reader learns to use arrays. The book also includes coverage of more advanced topics such as inheritance, polymorphism, the creation and management of packages, advanced GUI applications, and recursion. From early in the book, applications are documented with javadoc comments. Although it is written for readers with no prior programming background, even experienced programmers will benefit from its depth of detail.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781576761717
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 3/28/2005
  • Series: Gaddis Series
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Product dimensions: 7.30 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Table of Contents

CHAPTER 1 Introduction to Computers and Java
1.1 Introduction
1.2 Why Program?
1.3 Computer Systems: Hardware and Software
1.4 Programming Languages
1.5 What Is a Program Made Of?
1.6 The Programming Process
1.7 Object-Oriented Programming
Review Questions and Exercises
Programming Challenge

CHAPTER 2 Java Fundamentals
2.1 The Parts of a Java Program
2.2 The print and println Methods, and the Java API
2.3 Variables and Literals
2.4 Primitive Data Types
2.5 Arithmetic Operators
2.6 Combined Assignment Operators
2.7 Conversion Between Primitive Data Types
2.8 Creating Named Constants with final
2.9 The String Class
2.10 Scope
2.11 Comments
2.12 Programming Style
2.13 Reading Keyboard Input
2.14 Dialog Boxes
2.15 Common Errors to Avoid
Review Questions and Exercises
Programming Challenges

CHAPTER 3 Decision Structures
3.1 The if Statement
3.2 The if-else Statement
3.3 The if-else-if Statement
3.4 Nested if Statements
3.5 Logical Operators
3.6 Comparing String Objects
3.7 More about Variable Declaration and Scope
3.8 The Conditional Operator (Optional)
3.9 The switch Statement
3.10 Creating Objects with the DecimalFormat Class
3.11 The printf Method (Optional)
3.12 Common Errors to Avoid
Review Questions and Exercises
Programming Challenges

CHAPTER 4 Loops and Files
4.1 The Increment and Decrement Operators
4.2 The while Loop
4.3 Using the while Loop for Input Validation
4.4 The do-while Loop
4.5 The for Loop
4.6 Running Totals and Sentinel Values
4.7 Nested Loops
4.8 The break andcontinue Statements (Optional)
4.9 Deciding Which Loop to Use
4.10 Introduction to File Input and Output
4.11 The Random Class
4.12 Common Errors to Avoid
Review Questions and Exercises
Programming Challenges

CHAPTER 5 Methods
5.1 Introduction to Methods
5.2 Passing Arguments to a Method
5.3 More About Local Variables
5.4 Returning a Value from a Method
5.5 Problem Solving with Methods
5.6 Common Errors to Avoid
Review Questions and Exercises
Programming Challenges

CHAPTER 6 A First Look at Classes
6.1 Classes and Objects
6.2 Instance Fields and Methods
6.3 Constructors
6.4 Overloading Methods and Constructors
6.5 Scope of Instance Fields
6.6 Packages and import Statements
6.7 Focus on Object-Oriented Design: Finding the Classes and Their Responsibilities
6.8 Common Errors to Avoid
Review Questions and Exercises
Programming Challenges

CHAPTER 7 A First Look at GUI Applications
7.1 Introduction
7.2 Creating Windows
7.3 Equipping GUI Classes with a main Method
7.4 Layout Managers
7.5 Radio Buttons and Check Boxes
7.6 Borders
7.7 Focus on Problem Solving: Extending Classes from JPanel
7.8 Using Console Output to Debug a GUI Application
7.9 Common Errors to Avoid
Review Questions and Exercises
Programming Challenges

CHAPTER 8 Arrays and the ArrayList Class
8.1 Introduction to Arrays
8.2 Processing Array Contents
8.3 Passing Arrays as Arguments to Methods
8.4 Some Useful Array Algorithms and Operations
8.5 Returning Arrays from Methods
8.6 String Arrays
8.7 Arrays of Objects
8.8 The Sequential Search Algorithm
8.9 Two-Dimensional Arrays
8.10 Arrays with Three or More Dimensions
8.11 The Selection Sort and the Binary Search Algorithms
8.12 Command-Line Arguments and Variable-Length Argument Lists
8.13 The ArrayList Class
8.14 Common Errors to Avoid
Review Questions and Exercises
Programming Challenges

CHAPTER 9 A Second Look at Classes and Objects
9.1 Static Class Members
9.2 Passing Objects as Arguments to Methods
9.3 Returning Objects from Methods
9.4 The toString Method
9.5 Writing an equals Method
9.6 Methods that Copy Objects
9.7 Aggregation
9.8 The this Reference Variable
9.9 Enumerated Types
9.10 Garbage Collection
9.11 Focus on Object-Oriented Design: Class Collaborations
9.12 Common Errors to Avoid
Review Questions and Exercises
Programming Challenges

CHAPTER 10 Text Processing and More About Wrapper Classes
10.1 Introduction to Wrapper Classes
10.2 Character Testing and Conversion with the Character Class
10.3 More String Methods
10.4 The StringBuffer Class
10.5 Tokenizing Strings
10.6 Wrapper Classes for the Numeric Data Types
10.7 Focus on Problem Solving: The TestScoreReader Class
10.8 Common Errors to Avoid
Review Questions and Exercises
Programming Challenges

CHAPTER 11 Inheritance
11.1 What Is Inheritance?
11.2 Calling the Superclass Constructor
11.3 Overriding Superclass Methods
11.4 Protected Members
11.5 Chains of Inheritance
11.6 The Object Class
11.7 Polymorphism
11.8 Abstract Classes and Abstract Methods
11.9 Interfaces
11.10 Common Errors to Avoid
Review Questions and Exercises
Programming Challenges

CHAPTER 12 Exceptions and More about Stream I/O
12.1 Handling Exceptions
12.2 Throwing Exceptions
12.3 More about Input/Output Streams
12.4 Advanced Topics: Binary Files, Random Access Files, and Object Serialization
12.5 Common Errors to Avoid
Review Questions and Exercises
Programming Challenges

CHAPTER 13 Advanced GUI Applications
13.1 The Swing and AWT Class Hierarchy
13.2 Read-Only Text Fields
13.3 Lists
13.4 Combo Boxes
13.5 Displaying Images in Labels and Buttons
13.6 Mnemonics and Tool Tips
13.7 File Choosers and Color Choosers
13.8 Menus
13.9 More about Text Components: Text Areas and Fonts
13.10 Sliders
13.11 Look and Feel
13.12 Common Errors to Avoid
Review Questions and Exercises
Programming Challenges

CHAPTER 14 Applets and More
14.1 Introduction to Applets
14.2 A Brief Introduction to HTML
14.3 Creating Applets with Swing
14.4 Using AWT for Portability
14.5 Drawing Shapes
14.6 Handling Mouse Events
14.7 Timer Objects
14.8 Playing Audio
14.9 Common Errors to Avoid
Review Questions and Exercises
Programming Challenges

CHAPTER 15 Recursion
15.1 Introduction to Recursion
15.2 Solving Problems with Recursion
15.3 Examples of Recursive Methods
15.4 A Recursive Binary Search Method
15.5 The Towers of Hanoi
15.6 Common Errors to Avoid
Review Questions and Exercises
Programming Challenges

Appendices on CD-ROM
Appendix A The ASCII and Unicode Characters
Appendix B Operator Precedence Table
Appendix C Java Key Words
Appendix D Installing and Using the JDK
Appendix E Using the javadoc Utility
Appendix F More About the Math Class
Appendix G Packages
Appendix H Working with Records and Random Access Files
Appendix I The QuickSort Algorithm
Appendix J Using JBuilder 8
Appendix K More About JOptionPane Dialog Boxes
Appendix L Answers to Checkpoints
Appendix M Answers to Odd Numbered Review Questions
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