State Houses: America's 50 State Capitol Buildings

Overview

A magnificent celebration of America's state capitol buildings.

These glorious buildings are, in the author's words, "the homes of history," where laws are passed, where democracy is enacted, where history is written. Though each state capitol bears some similarity to the other forty-nine, each in its architecture and design reflects uniquely the pride of its state, both culturally and historically.

For this unprecedented project, photographer ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (8) from $16.04   
  • New (2) from $155.88   
  • Used (6) from $16.04   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$155.88
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(366)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$175.00
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(241)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

A magnificent celebration of America's state capitol buildings.

These glorious buildings are, in the author's words, "the homes of history," where laws are passed, where democracy is enacted, where history is written. Though each state capitol bears some similarity to the other forty-nine, each in its architecture and design reflects uniquely the pride of its state, both culturally and historically.

For this unprecedented project, photographer Tom Patterson traveled to each of America's fifty state capitals to capture the architectural beauty and dignity of its capitol building in glorious large-format color images.

Writer Susan W. Thrane reveals fascinating details about each capitol building's beginnings:

  • the events surrounding construction
  • background on its architects and builders
  • dimensions and costs
  • primary features and main rooms
  • unique furnishings and works of art.

The book also discusses important moments in the history of each building and the state itself, including:

  • the origin of the state's name
  • its capital city
  • when the state was admitted to the Union, and
  • the number of members in its legislative bodies.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Choice - C.W. Westfall
Handsome, readable book... each capital receives a brief, detailed, and engaging review... many photographs (by Patterson), all new and all in color, portray interior features, many newly revealed by recent restorations.
Booklist - Brad Hooper
Lovely large-format book... take an informative, luxurious trip through the pages of this volume... accompanying the beautiful full-color interior and exterior shots is sprightly text describing design, decoration, and construction.
San Diego Union-Tribute - David Elliott
Domed pomp and coffered circumstance... from Ohio's oddly undomed pile to Vermont's simple charmer.
Salem Statesman Journal - Dan Hays
Beautiful and informative... This book is a pleasing read and a nice way to travel without leaving your chair.
Kansas City Star - John Mark Bberhart
For anyone with a real interest in the places across the nation 'where democracy is enacted'... the photography is undeniably beautiful.
Library Journal
Before Google, memorizing state capitals-along with learning the flags of the world and varieties of dinosaurs-ranked as an elementary school pedagogical pastime. This work by attorney and preservationist Thrane systematically presents the current procession of capitol buildings, which were designed to express the unique past and identity of each state and, collectively, of the United States. Beginning with Maryland, purportedly the oldest working capitol (the author mentions interstate rivalries over historic supremacy), and ending with Alabama, the newest, the book devotes to each structure six pages of informative descriptions and color photos of majestic exteriors, ornate interiors, sculpture, and state symbols by Patterson (County Courthouses of Ohio, also coauthored by Thrane). Thrane also provides a brief history of state government and capital locations and notes efforts to preserve former legislative facilities. Architecturally, neoclassicism dominates-32 capitols sport externally visible domes-and only a few of the more modern buildings depart radically from accepted styles. A bibliography focuses on state histories and guidebooks. The only comparable comprehensive capitols guidebook is Willis J. Ehlert's America's Heritage: Capitols of the United States. Recommended as a popular guide, in particular for school and public libraries.-Russell T. Clement, Northwestern Univ. Lib., Evanston, IL Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781550464573
  • Publisher: Boston Mills Press
  • Publication date: 9/12/2005
  • Pages: 336
  • Product dimensions: 10.75 (w) x 10.75 (h) x 1.12 (d)

Meet the Author

Susan Waddell Thrane practiced law in Ohio before writing County Courthouses of Ohio. She is now involved in historic preservation in Thetford, Vermont, where she is a member of the local renovation and restoration committee.

Tom Patterson's photography has appeared in a wide range of publications. His previous book, County Courthouses of Ohio, was also co-authored by Susan Waddell Thrane. He lives in Dayton, Ohio, where he operates a photography and graphic design studio.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface
Introduction

Maryland State House
Virginia State Capitol
Massachusetts State House
New Hampshire State House
Maine State House
Tennessee State Capitol
Vermont State House
Ohio State House
California State Capitol
Michigan State Capitol
Connecticut State Capitol
Iowa State Capitol
Illinois State Capitol
Indiana State House
Texas State Capitol
Georgia State Capitol
New Jersey State House
New York State Capitol
Montana State Capitol
Kansas State Capitol
Mississippi State Capitol
Rhode Island State House
Pennsylvania State Capitol
Minnesota State Capitol
South Carolina State Capitol

Colorado State Capitol
Kentucky State Capitol
South Dakota State Capitol
Utah State Capitol
Arkansas State Capitol
Wyoming State Capitol
Wisconsin State Capitol
Missouri State Capitol
Oklahoma State Capitol
Idaho State Capitol
Washington Legislative Building
Alaska State Capitol
West Virginia State Capitol
Nebraska State Capitol
Louisiana State Capitol
Delaware Legislative Hall
North Dakota State Capitol
Oregon State Capitol
Arizona Legislative Buildings
North Carolina State Legislative Building
New Mexico State Capitol
Hawaii State Capitol
Nevada Legislative Building
Florida State Capitol
Alabama State House

Photographer's Notes and Acknowledgments
Bibliography
Index

Read More Show Less

Preface

Preface

My interest in state capitols can be traced back to my childhood in rural Iowa, not far from Iowa City, the state's first capital. There, amid the University of Iowa buildings and overlooking the Iowa River, stood the old stone Greek Revival capitol. To me it was the largest and most handsome building in the world.

My father knew its history: it was the territorial capitol (1842-1846) where Iowa inaugurated its first governor; home to the first six General Assemblies from 1846 to 1857; the site where the state constitution was drafted and where the state university was chartered in 1847. In fact, the capitol was the university's first permanent structure, and it housed the University of Iowa's administrative offices for over 113 years as the university built around and enveloped it. When my family traveled throughout the United States (most memorably in a 1948 Ford), we looked for state capitols, often recognizable by their Renaissance-style golden domes.

While preparing this book, I discovered that we were not alone in our interest. The admiration, even veneration, of people toward their civic temples became increasingly evident. This was especially clear to me the day I was visiting Des Moines and working in the elegant law library of the present Iowa State Capitol. I was interrupted by news from Iowa City that the first capitol, now a landmark, was burning. As the tragedy unfolded, I joined the librarians watching the collapse of its cupola on the Internet. Simultaneously, throughout the building and the state, distraught Iowans wept at their loss.

This respect and devotion are not surprising. Capitols are symbols of democracy. They are homes of history, where leaders are elected and laws are passed. Moreover, capitols reflect the unique past and identity of each state and, collectively, of the United States. Architecturally, despite the fact that at least thirty-two states have capitols with externally visible domes, each is distinctive. They are also repositories of arts and crafts in the stained glass, carved wood, delicate ironwork, mosaic tiles and large murals that are no longer economically feasible to incorporate into new public buildings.

Significantly, in our increasingly rootless twenty-first-century society, the capitols bring continuity from our past to the future. And the business carried on within these historic structures has become increasingly relevant to the lives of each of us as states assume a growing role in the fluctuating federal system.

The buildings notwithstanding, differences in the legislation of the fifty states demonstrate their unique character, One vintage legislation, "An Act Directing what Fence shall be deemed lawful," was enacted by the Vermont General Assembly in 1780, before Vermont became a part of the United States, and remains on the books. In contrast, the Wisconsin legislature outlawed oleomargarine until 1967 and still restricts its use. Throughout the book, many of the chapters contain examples of other laws passed in the legislative chambers of these buildings.

And along the way, what history and stories were discovered! During 1807, in the old house of the Virginia Capitol, Aaron Burr was tried for treason and acquitted, with John Marshall, chief justice of the United States Supreme Court, presiding. Angelina Grimke, the first woman known to address a state legislative body, gave a speech advocating the abolition of slavery in the old Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1838. In Ohio, in order to save money, the General Assembly drafted prisoners to build its state house. Jefferson Davis proclaimed independence and the birth of the Confederacy from Alabama's old state capitol, where later, in 1963, civil-rights activists protested Alabama's newly inaugurated governor, George Wallace. Wallace promised loyalty to segregation while standing on the capitol steps, within view of Martin Luther King's Dexter Avenue Baptist church. In Kansas, semi-nude women in frescoes commissioned by the Populist Patty were replaced with fully clothed figures when the Republican Party took control.

While these are special, singular events, one in particular that tied many of the state capitols together and focused national attention on them occurred following Lincoln's assassination, His body was transported from Washington, D.C., to Springfield, Illinois, by train, befitting his strong support of railroads, first as an attorney and then as president.

During a three-week period, the cortège stopped at Pennsylvania's capitol, in Harrisburg, and at New York's state capitol, in Albany, before his body was brought through the front doors of the state house in Columbus, Ohio, and lay in state for eight hours,
Thousands of grieving Hoosiers later filed through the first Indianapolis State House, when for eighteen hours his body lay in state in its rotunda, For two days in Representatives Hall of the Illinois old capitol, seventy-five thousand mourners passed before his casket before the burial in his hometown of Springfield. This mourning did not take place in churches or business auditoriums but in state capitols, or as some call them, civic churches, symbolic of state government and American democracy.

Events such as these indicate that state capitols represent history, as well as being repositories of legislation, architectural design, and especially interior design and artwork, The art is more than decoration -- it conveys the state's history, by emphasizing public figures and events and by promoting government. Thomas Hart Benton and N.C. Wyeth created murals with westward expansion themes for Missouri's capitol in Jefferson City. The New Mexico State Capitol is considered an art museum, with changing displays of works by living New Mexican artists, reflecting the state's unique heritage. Charles M. Russell's painting of Lewis and Clark meeting Native Americans in 1805 dominates the Montana House chamber, while above the grand staircase is a mural depicting the driving of the golden spike commemorating the completion of the transcontinental Northern Pacific Railroad at Gold Creek, Montana, Also noteworthy are John Steuarr Curry's mural of John Brown in Kansas, Gilbert Stuart's portrait of George Washington in Rhode Island, and Virginia's life-size statue of one of its favorite sons, George Washington. War memorials and statuary placed on the buildings and grounds include a statue of Sergeant Alvin C. York, a hero of the First World War, on the grounds of Tennessee's capitol and Daniel Chester French's sculpture of the gilded quadriga above the entrance portico of the Minnesota Capitol. Moreover, after the Civil War, installing such public art as Confederate memorials preserved the culture of the South.

Eager to absorb and connect with the fifty capitols, my journey began in New England, followed by the Mid-Atlantic states and the Midwest, then on to the remaining states. While Atlanta, Boston, Honolulu and Denver are major metropolitan centers, others exist and are primarily known because they are state capitols. Juneau, for example, has only about thirty-one thousand inhabitants. Helena, Frankfort, Augusta and Pierre are even smaller than Juneau, but Vermont's Montpelier is the smallest, with less than one third the population of Juneau.

Throughout this long project I came into contact with too many men and women to acknowledge individually their gracious and enthusiastic assistance. They include state archivists and librarians, state historical preservation officers, capitol curators and historians, legislative council attorneys and staff, capitol tour guides, state legislators and officials, I am, however, particularly indebted to my children, John Wilfong and Sara Wilfong, and my husband, Bill Thrane, for their ongoing encouragement, support and good humor. After a hiking accident that had a significant impact on my ability to proceed, they rearranged schedules, became my drivers and travel companions, took on additional domestic responsibilities, and overall contributed to maki

Read More Show Less

Introduction

Preface

My interest in state capitols can be traced back to my childhood in rural Iowa, not far from Iowa City, the state's first capital. There, amid the University of Iowa buildings and overlooking the Iowa River, stood the old stone Greek Revival capitol. To me it was the largest and most handsome building in the world.

My father knew its history: it was the territorial capitol (1842-1846) where Iowa inaugurated its first governor; home to the first six General Assemblies from 1846 to 1857; the site where the state constitution was drafted and where the state university was chartered in 1847. In fact, the capitol was the university's first permanent structure, and it housed the University of Iowa's administrative offices for over 113 years as the university built around and enveloped it. When my family traveled throughout the United States (most memorably in a 1948 Ford), we looked for state capitols, often recognizable by their Renaissance-style golden domes.

While preparing this book, I discovered that we were not alone in our interest. The admiration, even veneration, of people toward their civic temples became increasingly evident. This was especially clear to me the day I was visiting Des Moines and working in the elegant law library of the present Iowa State Capitol. I was interrupted by news from Iowa City that the first capitol, now a landmark, was burning. As the tragedy unfolded, I joined the librarians watching the collapse of its cupola on the Internet. Simultaneously, throughout the building and the state, distraught Iowans wept at their loss.

This respect and devotion are not surprising. Capitols are symbols of democracy. They are homes ofhistory, where leaders are elected and laws are passed. Moreover, capitols reflect the unique past and identity of each state and, collectively, of the United States. Architecturally, despite the fact that at least thirty-two states have capitols with externally visible domes, each is distinctive. They are also repositories of arts and crafts in the stained glass, carved wood, delicate ironwork, mosaic tiles and large murals that are no longer economically feasible to incorporate into new public buildings.

Significantly, in our increasingly rootless twenty-first-century society, the capitols bring continuity from our past to the future. And the business carried on within these historic structures has become increasingly relevant to the lives of each of us as states assume a growing role in the fluctuating federal system.

The buildings notwithstanding, differences in the legislation of the fifty states demonstrate their unique character, One vintage legislation, "An Act Directing what Fence shall be deemed lawful," was enacted by the Vermont General Assembly in 1780, before Vermont became a part of the United States, and remains on the books. In contrast, the Wisconsin legislature outlawed oleomargarine until 1967 and still restricts its use. Throughout the book, many of the chapters contain examples of other laws passed in the legislative chambers of these buildings.

And along the way, what history and stories were discovered! During 1807, in the old house of the Virginia Capitol, Aaron Burr was tried for treason and acquitted, with John Marshall, chief justice of the United States Supreme Court, presiding. Angelina Grimke, the first woman known to address a state legislative body, gave a speech advocating the abolition of slavery in the old Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1838. In Ohio, in order to save money, the General Assembly drafted prisoners to build its state house. Jefferson Davis proclaimed independence and the birth of the Confederacy from Alabama's old state capitol, where later, in 1963, civil-rights activists protested Alabama's newly inaugurated governor, George Wallace. Wallace promised loyalty to segregation while standing on the capitol steps, within view of Martin Luther King's Dexter Avenue Baptist church. In Kansas, semi-nude women in frescoes commissioned by the Populist Patty were replaced with fully clothed figures when the Republican Party took control.

While these are special, singular events, one in particular that tied many of the state capitols together and focused national attention on them occurred following Lincoln's assassination, His body was transported from Washington, D.C., to Springfield, Illinois, by train, befitting his strong support of railroads, first as an attorney and then as president.

During a three-week period, the cortège stopped at Pennsylvania's capitol, in Harrisburg, and at New York's state capitol, in Albany, before his body was brought through the front doors of the state house in Columbus, Ohio, and lay in state for eight hours, Thousands of grieving Hoosiers later filed through the first Indianapolis State House, when for eighteen hours his body lay in state in its rotunda, For two days in Representatives Hall of the Illinois old capitol, seventy-five thousand mourners passed before his casket before the burial in his hometown of Springfield. This mourning did not take place in churches or business auditoriums but in state capitols, or as some call them, civic churches, symbolic of state government and American democracy.

Events such as these indicate that state capitols represent history, as well as being repositories of legislation, architectural design, and especially interior design and artwork, The art is more than decoration -- it conveys the state's history, by emphasizing public figures and events and by promoting government. Thomas Hart Benton and N.C. Wyeth created murals with westward expansion themes for Missouri's capitol in Jefferson City. The New Mexico State Capitol is considered an art museum, with changing displays of works by living New Mexican artists, reflecting the state's unique heritage. Charles M. Russell's painting of Lewis and Clark meeting Native Americans in 1805 dominates the Montana House chamber, while above the grand staircase is a mural depicting the driving of the golden spike commemorating the completion of the transcontinental Northern Pacific Railroad at Gold Creek, Montana, Also noteworthy are John Steuarr Curry's mural of John Brown in Kansas, Gilbert Stuart's portrait of George Washington in Rhode Island, and Virginia's life-size statue of one of its favorite sons, George Washington. War memorials and statuary placed on the buildings and grounds include a statue of Sergeant Alvin C. York, a hero of the First World War, on the grounds of Tennessee's capitol and Daniel Chester French's sculpture of the gilded quadriga above the entrance portico of the Minnesota Capitol. Moreover, after the Civil War, installing such public art as Confederate memorials preserved the culture of the South.

Eager to absorb and connect with the fifty capitols, my journey began in New England, followed by the Mid-Atlantic states and the Midwest, then on to the remaining states. While Atlanta, Boston, Honolulu and Denver are major metropolitan centers, others exist and are primarily known because they are state capitols. Juneau, for example, has only about thirty-one thousand inhabitants. Helena, Frankfort, Augusta and Pierre are even smaller than Juneau, but Vermont's Montpelier is the smallest, with less than one third the population of Juneau.

Throughout this long project I came into contact with too many men and women to acknowledge individually their gracious and enthusiastic assistance. They include state archivists and librarians, state historical preservation officers, capitol curators and historians, legislative council attorneys and staff, capitol tour guides, state legislators and officials, I am, however, particularly indebted to my children, John Wilfong and Sara Wilfong, and my husband, Bill Thrane, for their ongoing encouragement, support and good humor. After a hiking accident that had a significant impact on my ability to proceed, they rearranged schedules, became my drivers and travel companions, took on additional domestic responsibilities, and overall contributed to making life easier so that my work could be completed. Thank you.

Susan Waddell Thrane

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)