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Stay Awake, Sally
     

Stay Awake, Sally

by Mitra Modarressi
 

Kids who will do anything to put off their own bedtime will get a kick out of the clever role reversal in this lovable raccoon family!

Sally's mom and dad want to stay up all night—who could even think of sleeping when there's so much fun to be had? Playing games, baking cookies, reading just one more story—there's no end to the excitement they have in

Overview

Kids who will do anything to put off their own bedtime will get a kick out of the clever role reversal in this lovable raccoon family!

Sally's mom and dad want to stay up all night—who could even think of sleeping when there's so much fun to be had? Playing games, baking cookies, reading just one more story—there's no end to the excitement they have in store for Sally.

But Sally's eyelids are getting droopy, and she's too sleepy to play any more games. How will she convince her parents that it's her bedtime?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Although its winsome raccoons recall the badgers of Bedtime for Frances, this sweetly ironic tale reverses parent/child roles. To little raccoon Sally's dismay, her energetic parents will not let her get to sleep. Modarressi (Yard Sale) relays the family's conversation in sprightly rhyme: " 'The night is still young!/ Come play,' they both said./ 'Stay awake, Sally./ Don't go to bed.' " Indeed, Cat in the Hatfans may hear echoes of that book's Sally and the misbehaving Cat. Comical gouaches picture the manic dad with his laptop and mom with her newspaper, with a "Dining Out" headline underscored by a picture of a trash can. Later, Sally stares from their treehouse window as the fun-loving adults exhort her to "dance in the yard!/ Stay awake, Sally./ It isn't that hard." As Sally begs them to turn out her light, the parents try classic stalling tactics: " 'Would you care for some water?'/ 'Are you sure you're well-fed?'/ 'Shall we check for a monster under your bed?' Finally, the child puts her foot down and the antic insomniacs relent. Modarressi's soft-hued illustrations of the pear-shaped party animals conjure goodwill toward the whole raccoon family. Ages 4-up. (Oct.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 1
In a humorous role-reversal tale, Sally just wants to get a good night's sleep before going to school, but her parents try to coax her into staying up with them. To the small, yet responsible raccoon, however, all of their enticements, such as baking cookies, playing games, or dancing in the backyard, are not sufficient. While her folks are occupied with ways to keep her awake, she's busy brushing her teeth, bathing, and washing her hair, and is forced to be adamant: "'ENOUGH!' I cried out./'You'll just have to go./I love you a lot,/But my answer is no.'" That's when her energetic parents finally give in to their daughter's wishes and bid her "Good night." The delicately colored illustrations are filled with curves and circles, and round, plump raccoons that are pleasing to the eye. Children will be tickled with this story, told in rhyming couplets, of a resolute and unwavering child determined to go to bed at a reasonable hour.
—Maryann H. OwenCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
When little Sally is sleepy, Mom and Dad turn the tables on her. A cute raccoon in an orange dress, Sally tells her own story in bouncy first-person verse. It's bedtime but, surprisingly, her parents exclaim, "The night is still young!" They tempt her with sweet snacks, toys, music and a stack of bedtime stories. Sally stays firmly on task, however, brushing her teeth, taking a bath and limiting bedtime reading to a single book. "One story? Choose four!" the parents reply. "Stay awake, Sally. Just a few minutes more." Sally cries "ENOUGH!" and Mom and Dad quickly tuck her in. Modarressi's soft and simple watercolors should be inviting to the very young, who will be amused by the role reversal but likely oblivious to the story as a play of parental psychology. A slight treat for both generations. (Picture book. 2-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399245459
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
10/18/2007
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.40(w) x 10.36(h) x 0.42(d)
Lexile:
AD240L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Mitra Modarressi is also the illustrator of Timothy Tugbottom Says No! She lives in San Francisco, California.

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