Stay Up!: Los Angeles Street Art

Stay Up!: Los Angeles Street Art

by G. James Daichendt
     
 

Stay Up! Los Angeles Street Art is an investigation of the global phenomenon of street art. Told from the perspective of artists working in Los Angeles, it offers a new vantage point for understanding an art form that is widely popular yet has been the subject of speculation and much uncertainty.

Questions whether street art is the next major art movement

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Overview

Stay Up! Los Angeles Street Art is an investigation of the global phenomenon of street art. Told from the perspective of artists working in Los Angeles, it offers a new vantage point for understanding an art form that is widely popular yet has been the subject of speculation and much uncertainty.

Questions whether street art is the next major art movement or if it a simply a trend and the differences between graffiti and street art are explored. A number of counterintuitive themes plague street art but that does not stop the excitement and enthusiasm surrounding this engaging and exciting art form.

Street art has exploded as a creative outlet and progressed from a counter culture movement based in graffiti in previous decades to a legitimate business platform in design, fashion, film, publishing, and art. The author explores the uniqueness of L.A. along with some of the successes and pitfalls these creative artists encounter. The major themes presented will familiarize the reader with the street art scene in L.A. and add new meaning to this creative capital.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This celebration of a movement and body of work “sometimes considered vandalism and sometimes cultural treasures” reflects its practitioners’ exuberance and recklessness; even the book’s raw-edged cardboard covers, plastered with graphically bold images, immediately signal the playful, gritty, provocative attitude of its subject. Multiple pages of photographs of works, collaged and crammed together, predominate, evoking walls layered with paintings, murals, and “wheat pastes”—paper-based artworks. Azusa Pacific University art historian Daichendt (Artist Teacher) draws on his academic knowledge and interviews with arts professionals, photographers, collectors, and, most significantly, the street artists themselves to muse on street art as a statement about the failure of modernism and its blurry borders with advertising, celebrity, and establishment art. Rather than analyzing individual works or artists, Daichendt focuses on the phenomenon itself; its roots in graffiti, skate-and-surf culture, and Los Angeles murals, and its relationship to the traditional art world, although articles critiquing some artists’ works appear in appendixes. Unfamiliar readers may be frustrated by the lack of identifying captions—artist credits are only provided in tiny, crowded print at the back of the book, but arguably this choice is justified by the anonymous, outlaw nature of the work itself. (Dec.)
From the Publisher
This celebration of a movement and body of work “sometimes considered vandalism and sometimes cultural treasures” reflects its practitioners’ exuberance and recklessness; even the book’s raw-edged cardboard covers, plastered with graphically bold images, immediately signal the playful, gritty, provocative attitude of its subject. Multiple pages of photographs of works, collaged and crammed together, predominate, evoking walls layered with paintings, murals, and “wheat pastes”—paper-based artworks. Azusa Pacific University art historian Daichendt (Artist Teacher) draws on his academic knowledge and interviews with arts professionals, photographers, collectors, and, most significantly, the street artists themselves to muse on street art as a statement about the failure of modernism and its blurry borders with advertising, celebrity, and establishment art. Rather than analyzing individual works or artists, Daichendt focuses on the phenomenon itself; its roots in graffiti, skate-and-surf culture, and Los Angeles murals, and its relationship to the traditional art world, although articles critiquing some artists’ works appear in appendixes. Unfamiliar readers may be frustrated by the lack of identifying captions—artist credits are only provided in tiny, crowded print at the back of the book, but arguably this choice is justified by the anonymous, outlaw nature of the work itself. - Publishers Weekly

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781937359348
Publisher:
Cameron + Company
Publication date:
12/11/2012
Pages:
208
Sales rank:
1,311,368
Product dimensions:
10.20(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.10(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
This celebration of a movement and body of work “sometimes considered vandalism and sometimes cultural treasures” reflects its practitioners’ exuberance and recklessness; even the book’s raw-edged cardboard covers, plastered with graphically bold images, immediately signal the playful, gritty, provocative attitude of its subject. Multiple pages of photographs of works, collaged and crammed together, predominate, evoking walls layered with paintings, murals, and “wheat pastes”—paper-based artworks. Azusa Pacific University art historian Daichendt (Artist Teacher) draws on his academic knowledge and interviews with arts professionals, photographers, collectors, and, most significantly, the street artists themselves to muse on street art as a statement about the failure of modernism and its blurry borders with advertising, celebrity, and establishment art. Rather than analyzing individual works or artists, Daichendt focuses on the phenomenon itself; its roots in graffiti, skate-and-surf culture, and Los Angeles murals, and its relationship to the traditional art world, although articles critiquing some artists’ works appear in appendixes. Unfamiliar readers may be frustrated by the lack of identifying captions—artist credits are only provided in tiny, crowded print at the back of the book, but arguably this choice is justified by the anonymous, outlaw nature of the work itself. - Publishers Weekly

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