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The Steadfast Tin Soldier (PagePerfect NOOK Book)
     

The Steadfast Tin Soldier (PagePerfect NOOK Book)

4.0 1
by Hans Christian Andersen, Cynthia Rylant, Jen Corace
 

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With her signature warmth and lyricism, Newbery winner Cynthia Rylant has crafted a new version of the classic Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale about a tin soldier who falls in love with a ballerina. As in the original story, the tin soldier's love for the beautiful ballerina is thwarted by a goblin. The tin soldier is separated from the other toys and washed down a

Overview

With her signature warmth and lyricism, Newbery winner Cynthia Rylant has crafted a new version of the classic Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale about a tin soldier who falls in love with a ballerina. As in the original story, the tin soldier's love for the beautiful ballerina is thwarted by a goblin. The tin soldier is separated from the other toys and washed down a sewer, where he encounters a rat and gets swallowed by a fish, but somehow, against all odds, he manages to end up back home only to be cast into the nursery fire. Rylant adds her own twist to the end of the tale, however, for in this version, the tin soldier and the ballerina are melded to each other, rather than melted, in the heat of the fire, so they'll never be parted again. Rylant's expert storytelling paired with Corace's stunning illustrations create a beautiful, unforgettable tale of everlasting love.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
Marcellino beautifully illustrates this tale of the brave tin soldier who falls in love with a paper ballerina. The soldier survives an incredible adventure only to be tossed in to the fire when he returns home. As he began to melt, the paper ballerina who he loves so desperately flies across room and joins him in the blaze. All that remained was a lump of tin in the shape of a heart and a burned spangle from the ballerina. The book was selected as one of the Ten Best Picture Books of the Year by the New York Times and one of the best by Booklist. 1997 (orig.
School Library Journal
Gr 1-3-- Either the hegemony of the Disney house, or the reluctance of an artist to sign rough drafts, has prevented any individual from being identified or credited for the ``illustrations from the Disney Archives'' used here. Instead of finished stills, the pictures are for the most part crude chalk sketches. The unattractive dancer recalls a Barbie prototype, and the flat-faced soldier is characterless. The pictures seem to have been composed for a storyboard, not a book. The text has been significantly altered, with small items added to fit the Disneyfied story: cliche (``. . . light at the end of the tunnel''), the imp made responsible for the soldier's misadventures, and a quite un-Andersenian ``Little Engine'' optimism (``I think it's getting easier each time I try . . .''). Several other editions are in print: try Samantha Easton's small-format version, illustrated by Michael Montgomery (Andrews & McMeel, 1991). --Patricia Dooley, Univ . of Washington, Seattle
Carolyn Phelan
In a young boy's room, a one-legged tin soldier stares lovingly at the ballerina doll, who also balances on one leg. When the boy carelessly places him on the windowsill, the little soldier falls to the street below and begins a journey that takes him to strange and dangerous places, and then brings him back home. There, in the flames of the stove, the tin soldier is finally united with his ballerina. This picture-book version of the classic fairy tale distills Andersen's original down to the essential narrative without fundamentally changing the nature of the story. The illustrations, varied in perspective and well composed for dramatic effect, tell the tale through a series of colorful double-page spreads that feature impressionistic views of nineteenth-century scenes. The simplified text makes this beautiful book suitable for a somewhat younger audience than the equally fine Seidler/Marcellino and Lewis/Lynch editions, both published in 1992.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781613124987
Publisher:
Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
Publication date:
03/12/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
32
File size:
21 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Cynthia Rylant is a two-time Newbery winner and the author of more than 100 books for children, including All in a Day. Jen Corace received her BFA in illustration from the Rhode Island School of Design and has illustrated a number of children's books, including Little Pea. Visit her at jencorace.com.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
April 2, 1805
Date of Death:
August 4, 1875
Place of Birth:
Odense, Denmark
Place of Death:
Copenhagen, Denmark

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Steadfast Tin Soldier 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you aren't ready to give your child un necessary concern's beware. The story is sweet but sad. The illustration is wonderful, The story is great, unfortunately my son wasn't ready. Great for children 8 and above.