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Steak Lover's Cookbook [NOOK Book]

Overview

It's a tremendous book. Bill Rice, one of the country's most talented food journalists, has written the classic cookbook for an all-American classic--steak. -- Emeril Lagasse, co-author of Emeril's New New Orleans Cooking

Steak for Every Occasion. Succulent, sizzling, sublimely delicious--for eating bliss thre's nothing like steak. And for William Rice finding the perfect steak has become a passion. Now the results of his search are served up in the essential steak lover's ...

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Steak Lover's Cookbook

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Overview

It's a tremendous book. Bill Rice, one of the country's most talented food journalists, has written the classic cookbook for an all-American classic--steak. -- Emeril Lagasse, co-author of Emeril's New New Orleans Cooking

Steak for Every Occasion. Succulent, sizzling, sublimely delicious--for eating bliss thre's nothing like steak. And for William Rice finding the perfect steak has become a passion. Now the results of his search are served up in the essential steak lover's companion, with over 140 recipes for perfectly cooked steaks, from craving to carving, plus the starters, the sauces, the sides, the desserts, the wines. And steak talk, too.



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Editorial Reviews

New York Times Book Review
One of the feistiest authors of the season is William Rice, the veteran food writer who, in this day of demonized red meat, nevertheless presents us with his Steak Lover's Cookbook. Steak today, he asserts, has become the "forbidden fruit." Images of prime meat dance in his head...Mr. Rice's book comes with all the trimmings: referrals to steak restaurants around the country, historical discussion and even suggestions on what to serve before the steak...It's retro, of course, and it's sybaritic, too, without apology.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Succulent, sizzling, sublimely delicious -- for eating bliss there's nothing like steak. And for William Rice, finding the perfect steak has become a passion. Now the results of his search are served up in the essential steak lover's companion, with over 140 recipes for perfectly cooked steaks, from craving to carving, plus the starters, the sauces, the sides, the desserts, the wines. And steak talk, too.

A steak lover, food writer, and journalist for over 30 years, William Rice tasted his first real thick and juicy steakhouse steak in college -- and he's been chasing steaks ever since, from America's legendary steakhouses to the tappen yaki rooms of Japanese restaurants, to Florence, Italy, for the famous Fiorentina. He and his wife live in Chicago, where he is the food and wine columnist of the Chicago Tribune.

Rump. Loin. Skirt. Hoof. Chuck. Flank.Butt. Sometimes it's hard to tell whether food journalist Rice gets greater pleasure from writing these meaty monosyllables or from eating the cuts of beef they name...Rice offers solid, simple recipes for every part of the cow, from an elegant steak au poivre 'The True Steak,' made with filet mignon to Chicken-Friend Cube Steak with Pan Gravy...With sidenotes on favored steakhouses, shopping tips, and ample cow lore, this cookbook offers plenty for both the casual and the committed carnivore to chew on.

Library Journal
Hard on the heels of Janeen Sarlin and Diane Porter's The Meat Lover's Cookbook (LJ 12/96) comes Rice's steak book, andjudging by the number of steakhouses that have opened in Manhattan in the last few months alonenot a moment too soon. Rice's tribute to steak offers delicious recipes for "Uptown" and "Downtown" cuts, along with several dozen appetizers and side dishes and a handful of desserts. Some of the beef dishes are from restaurants, including Steak à la Stone from the famed Palm; others are the author's own: Bloody Mary Steak and Sauce, Superior Steak Hash. With mouthwatering recipes and a passionate, witty, and informed text, this is recommended for most collections.
NY Times Book Review
One of the feistiest authors of the season is William Rice, the veteran food writer who, in this day of demonized red meat, nevertheless presents us with his Steak Lover's Cookbook. Steak today, he asserts, has become the "forbidden fruit." Images of prime meat dance in his head...Mr. Rice's book comes with all the trimmings: referrals to steak restaurants around the country, historical discussion and even suggestions on what to serve before the steak...It's retro, of course, and it's sybaritic, too, without apology.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780761178828
  • Publisher: Workman Publishing Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 1/4/1997
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 250
  • File size: 7 MB

Meet the Author

William Rice is the nationally-known food and wine columnist for The Chicago Tribune. One of America's most respected authorities on food preparation and wine, he has co-edited three editions of Where to Eat in America, a national restaurant guide, wrote Feasts of Wine and Food, a wine guide with recipes, and has contributed articles to Travel and Leisure, GQ, Gourmet, Elle, and Connoisseur. Before joining the Tribune, he was the editor-in-chief of Food & Wine magazine. Bill lives in Chicago with his wife, Jill Van Cleave, a specialist in recipe development.
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Read an Excerpt

(From the Steak Lover's Cookbook)

Hungarian Steak Soup

(Six servings)

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 1/2 pounds boneless round steak, 3/4 inch thick, excess fat removed and cut into 3/4-inch cubes.

1 medium onion, preferably a sweet onion such as Vidalia, half coarsely chopped and half thinly sliced.

1 green bell pepper, cored, seeded, half cut into chunks and half cut into 1/4-inch strips

1 red bell pepper, cored, seeded, half cut into chunks and half cut into 1/4-inch strips

1 teaspoon sweet paprika, Hungarian preferred

1 teaspoon hot paprika, Hungarian preferred

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1/2 teaspoon caraway seeds, toasted briefly

6 cups beef broth

2 bay leaves

1 tablespoon chopped garlic

2 teaspoons tomato paste

Salt

6 ounces wide egg noodles

Sour cream, for garnish

Heat oil in an uncovered pressure cooker over medium-high heat until it shimmers. Pat the steak cubes dry with paper towels. Add half the meat and brown on all sides, about 4 minutes. Transfer to a bowl with a slotted spoon. Add the remaining meat and repeat browning process. Transfer the meat to the bowl.

Add the chopped onion and chopped bell pepper (reserving the sliced onion and pepper for later) to the pressure cooker. Stir frequently until the vegetables soften, 4 to 5 minutes. Add the paprikas, black peppers and the caraway seeds and stir for 1 minute. Pour in the beef broth, then add the bay leaves, garlic, tomato paste and the steak cubes.

Cover and seal the pressure cooker and bring to full pressure over high heat Regulate the heat and cook for 20 minutes. (If using a conventional pot, simmer the meat, partially covered, for 1 hour.) Release pressure and uncover the cooker. The meat should be cooked through and tender. If not, re-cover the pot, regain full pressure and cook an additional five minutes.

Pour the soup through a colander into a bowl, leaving as much of the meat as possible in the pot. Pick out the meat cubes in the colander and return to the pot. Discard the vegetables in the colander and any remaining in the pot.

Add the uncooked onion and bell pepper to the pot and pour broth atop the vegetables and meat. Bring the soup to a boil over high heat, then turn the heat to low and cook at a simmer until the vegetables are just tender, 7 to 8 minutes.

Meanwhile, bring water to a boil in a large saucepan. Add salt and noodles and cook until just tender, about 5 minutes. Drain the noodles and portion 1/2 cup of the cooked noodles into each of six soup plates.

Ladle the hot soup over the noodles and serve at once. Pass sour cream at the table.

Cracked Pepper Rib Eye with Roasted Onion Sauce

1 medium sweet onion, cut into 8 wedges

1 teaspoon olive oil

Salt, to taste

2/3 cup beef broth

1 teaspoon soy sauce

4 teaspoons cracked black pepper

4 rib eye steaks (about 10 inches each) cut 3/4 inch thick

Heat the oven to 350 degrees

Place the onion wedges in a baking dish. Drizzle with the oil and sprinkle with just a little salt. Stir to coat all the pieces evenly. Roast the onions, uncovered, until browned and soft, about 1 hour. Remove and let stand until slightly cooled.

Put the onions in the blender. Add the beef broth and soy sauce and blend to a smooth puree. Transfer the sauce to a small saucepan or a microwave-safe dish, cover and set aside.

Preheat the broiler or prepare coals for grilling. Press the cracked pepper onto both sides of each steak, using about 1 teaspoon of pepper for each. Broil or grill the steaks until seared and nicely browned on one side, about 4 minutes for medium-rare and 5 minutes for medium. Turn and cook 4 minutes more for medium-rare and medium.

While the steaks are cooking, reheat the onion sauce on the stovetop or in a microwave oven. Spoon the warmed sauce over each steak and serve.

Serves 4.

Steak and Potato Salad

(William Rice suggests this salad either as a weekend lunch or as a light supper main course)

1 filet mignon (7 to 8 oz.), cut 1 inch thick

1 tbsp. cracked black peppercorns

1 1/2 tsp. vegetable oil

1 cooked red potato (about 6 oz.)

4 medium, white button mushrooms, stems trimmed

4 green onions, white and 2 in. of green

6 oz. mesclun (mixed baby greens)

Vinaigrette:

1 tsp. Dijon mustard

1 tbsp. red wine vinegar

4 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil

Salt, to taste

Coat the steak with pepper on all sides by pressing the cracked pepper into the meat.

Heat the oil in a small skillet over medium heat. Add the steak and cook until seared and nicely browned on one side, 4 minutes. Turn and cook the second side 4 minutes more for a medium rare steak, 5 minutes more for a medium. Remove the meat from the pan and set aside to cool at room temperature. (A leftover cooked steak au poivre may be substitued. Bring to room temperature before serving.)

Cut the potato into chunks. Thinly slice the mushrooms and green onions. Cut the steak into 1/4 inch thick slices and set aside. Place the mesclun in a large bowl. Whisk the vinaigrette ingredients together. Add the vinaigrette to the bowl and toss until the greens are coated lightly with dressing. Divide between 2 dinner plates or 4 salad plates. Scatter the potato chunks and mushroom slices over the greens. Fan the steak slices onto the center of the salad. Spoon any remaining dressing over the steak. Sprinkle the green onions over the meat and serve.

Makes 2 servings as a main course of 4 servings as a first course.

Excerpted from Steak Lover's Cookbook. Reprinted with permission by Workman Publishing.

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Table of Contents

Introduction: Great Steak

About Steak (Making, Buying, and Cooking Steak)

Uptown Cuts (Tenderloin, T-Bone, Porterhouse, Strip or Top Loin, Rib, Rib-Eye, Sirloin)

Downtown Cuts (Shuck, Round/Eye, Round/Rump, Flank, Skirt, Crosstown Cuts)

All Around the Town (Before the Steak, After the Steak, Mail-Order Steak)









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Recipe

Hungarian Steak Soup

Six servings

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 pounds boneless round steak, 3/4 inch thick, excess fat removed and cut into 3/4-inch cubes.
  • 1 medium onion, preferably a sweet onion such as Vidalia, half coarsely chopped and half thinly sliced.
  • 1 green bell pepper, cored, seeded, half cut into chunks and half cut into 1/4-inch strips
  • 1 red bell pepper, cored, seeded, half cut into chunks and half cut into 1/4-inch strips
  • 1 teaspoon sweet paprika, Hungarian preferred
  • 1 teaspoon hot paprika, Hungarian preferred
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon caraway seeds, toasted briefly
  • 6 cups beef broth
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 tablespoon chopped garlic
  • 2 teaspoons tomato paste
  • Salt
  • 6 ounces wide egg noodles
  • Sour cream, for garnish

Heat oil in an uncovered pressure cooker over medium-high heat until it shimmers. Pat the steak cubes dry with paper towels. Add half the meat and brown on all sides, about 4 minutes. Transfer to a bowl with a slotted spoon. Add the remaining meat and repeat browning process. Transfer the meat to the bowl.

Add the chopped onion and chopped bell pepper (reserving the sliced onion and pepper for later) to the pressure cooker. Stir frequently until the vegetables soften, 4 to 5 minutes. Add the paprikas, black peppers and the caraway seeds and stir for 1 minute. Pour in the beef broth, then add the bay leaves, garlic, tomato paste and the steak cubes.

Cover and seal the pressure cooker and bring to full pressure over high heat Regulate the heat and cook for 20 minutes. (If using a conventional pot, simmer the meat, partially covered, for 1 hour.) Release pressure and uncover the cooker. The meat should be cooked through and tender. If not, re-cover the pot, regain full pressure and cook an additional five minutes.

Pour the soup through a colander into a bowl, leaving as much of the meat as possible in the pot. Pick out the meat cubes in the colander and return to the pot. Discard the vegetables in the colander and any remaining in the pot.

Add the uncooked onion and bell pepper to the pot and pour broth atop the vegetables and meat. Bring the soup to a boil over high heat, then turn the heat to low and cook at a simmer until the vegetables are just tender, 7 to 8 minutes.

Meanwhile, bring water to a boil in a large saucepan. Add salt and noodles and cook until just tender, about 5 minutes. Drain the noodles and portion 1/2 cup of the cooked noodles into each of six soup plates.

Ladle the hot soup over the noodles and serve at once. Pass sour cream at the table.

Cracked Pepper Rib Eye with Roasted Onion Sauce

  • 1 medium sweet onion, cut into 8 wedges
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • Salt, to taste
  • 2/3 cup beef broth
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 4 teaspoons cracked black pepper
  • 4 rib eye steaks (about 10 inches each) cut 3/4 inch thick
Place the onion wedges in a baking dish. Drizzle with the oil and sprinkle with just a little salt. Stir to coat all the pieces evenly. Roast the onions, uncovered, until browned and soft, about 1 hour. Remove and let stand until slightly cooled.

Put the onions in the blender. Add the beef broth and soy sauce and blend to a smooth puree. Transfer the sauce to a small saucepan or a microwave-safe dish, cover and set aside. Preheat the broiler or prepare coals for grilling. Press the cracked pepper onto both sides of each steak, using about 1 teaspoon of pepper for each. Broil or grill the steaks until seared and nicely browned on one side, about 4 minutes for medium-rare and 5 minutes for medium.

Turn and cook 4 minutes more for medium-rare and medium.

While the steaks are cooking, reheat the onion sauce on the stovetop or in a microwave oven. Spoon the warmed sauce over each steak and serve.

Serves 4.

Steak and Potato Salad
William Rice suggests this salad either as a weekend lunch or as a light supper main course

  • 1 filet mignon (7 to 8 oz.), cut 1 inch thick
  • 1 tbsp. cracked black peppercorns
  • 1 1/2 tsp. vegetable oil
  • 1 cooked red potato (about 6 oz.)
  • 4 medium, white button mushrooms, stems trimmed
  • 4 green onions, white and 2 in. of green
  • 6 oz. mesclun (mixed baby greens)

    Vinaigrette:

  • 1 tsp. Dijon mustard
  • 1 tbsp. red wine vinegar
  • 4 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • Salt, to taste
Coat the steak with pepper on all sides by pressing the cracked pepper into the meat.

Heat the oil in a small skillet over medium heat. Add the steak and cook until seared and nicely browned on one side, 4 minutes. Turn and cook the second side 4 minutes more for a medium rare steak, 5 minutes more for a medium. Remove the meat from the pan and set aside to cool at room temperature. (A leftover cooked steak au poivre may be substitued. Bring to room temperature before serving.)

Cut the potato into chunks. Thinly slice the mushrooms and green onions. Cut the steak into 1/4 inch thick slices and set aside. Place the mesclun in a large bowl. Whisk the vinaigrette ingredients together. Add the vinaigrette to the bowl and toss until the greens are coated lightly with dressing. Divide between 2 dinner plates or 4 salad plates. Scatter the potato chunks and mushroom slices over the greens. Fan the steak slices onto the center of the salad. Spoon any remaining dressing over the steak. Sprinkle the green onions over the meat and serve.

Makes 2 servings as a main course of 4 servings as a first course.

Excerpted from Steak Lover's Cookbook. Copyright (c) 1996. Reprinted with permission by Workman Publishing.

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 8, 2011

    Disapointed

    Wanted to try something new so, I faithfully followed one of his sure-fire recipes with a well-marbled, carefully selected steak and it turned out like old shoe leather. I went back to my old way of doing it. Maybe my way of doing it doesn't turn out like a fancy restaurant steak, but it is edible.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

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