Stealing Home: The Story of Jackie Robinson

Stealing Home: The Story of Jackie Robinson

4.8 5
by Barry Denenberg
     
 

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On April 15, 1947, Jackie Robinson stepped onto Ebbets Field as a Brooklyn Dodger and changed American baseball forever.

The first black man to play in the white major leagues, he had the courage to confront racism and fight for the rights of all black people, on and off the baseball diamond. He shattered the color barrier, and with tremendous skill and

Overview

On April 15, 1947, Jackie Robinson stepped onto Ebbets Field as a Brooklyn Dodger and changed American baseball forever.

The first black man to play in the white major leagues, he had the courage to confront racism and fight for the rights of all black people, on and off the baseball diamond. He shattered the color barrier, and with tremendous skill and determination, he became not only one of the most legendary baseball players of all time, but also a great American hero.

Half a century later, Jackie Robinson's extraordinary story remains an important contribution to America's favorite pastime and to American history.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 4-6-- Still another biography of the black baseball pioneer. Denenberg provides an even and straightforward account of Robinson's life on and off the baseball diamond, balancing his athletic skills with his social significance and exploits outside of the sports arena. Occasional typos and errors in sports terminology do appear but are minor in context. A brief but interesting look at innovations to the game provided by the all-black baseball leagues will be of interest to serious baseball fans. The standard black-and-white photographs, many of which are found in the plethora of juvenile Robinson biographies that abound, are included here. No index or other appendixes are included. The reading level, writing style, and information is similar to Mark Alvarez's The Official Baseball Hall of Fame Story of Jackie Robinson (S. & S., 1990). --Tom S. Hurlburt, Rio Rancho Public Library, NM

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780590425605
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
05/28/1990
Series:
Scholastic Biography Series
Edition description:
Reissue
Pages:
128
Sales rank:
89,771
Product dimensions:
5.25(w) x 7.63(h) x 0.30(d)
Lexile:
930L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author


Barry Denenberg is a critically acclaimed author of nonfiction and historical fiction. His historical fiction books include titles in the Dear America, My Name Is America, and Royal Diaries series, many of which have been named NCSS/CBC Notable Social Studies Trade Books for Young People. His nonfiction books have covered a wide array of topics, from Anne Frank to Elvis Presley.

Barry Denenberg lives in Bedford, New York, with his wife and daughter.

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Stealing Home; the Story of Jackie Robinson 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book because it is about sports and the author tells me what happened to Jackie Robinson and what was going on in his life when he was young.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Do you ever wish you could make a big difference in your life and others life? Well by my opinion Jackie was one of the greatest players known to anybody. Jackie made the biggest strike of lighting on baseball just because he loved the sport. Jackie was a kind hear-ted person that respected everybody knowing that a lot of people still hated him just because they were jealous. The rising action of this story is actually deepen into he story but still started his life,it started when Jackie was first joining baseball as an African American. Another great guy was Branch Rickey, he was the was that industrialized baseball,meaning he was the one that decided on bringing Jackie up to the major leagues. In many peoples opinion Jackie made the game 10 times better. This story has more of an external conflict because its a conflict vs. society story because people are to jealous and racial of him. There was many things i liked about this story but the main idea that I liked was how he never tried to disrespect anyone like when he went to ST. Louis and people were swearing at him like crazy. The part of the story I didn't like though is when his own players disrespected him when he first joined the team.Textual example of what i didn't like is when all his teammates did nothing but swear at him.The falling resolution is when everybody finally respects him for who he is because he does great for many season by wining a couple batting titles and being known for stealing home.After a great life of many different challenges he died October 24, 1972.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I think that this book was interesting and was good because I love baseball.