Stealing Lumby (Lumby Series #2)

Stealing Lumby (Lumby Series #2)

3.5 9
by Gail Fraser
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Just a dot on the map of the northwest, Lumby looms big in the hearts of its residents. The townsfolk consider each other family as well as friends. And though the annual cow race can bring out the competitiveness in people, when times get tough, there is no better person to turn to than your nearest neighbor.

Lumby is thrown into the spotlight when one of the

…  See more details below

Overview

Just a dot on the map of the northwest, Lumby looms big in the hearts of its residents. The townsfolk consider each other family as well as friends. And though the annual cow race can bring out the competitiveness in people, when times get tough, there is no better person to turn to than your nearest neighbor.

Lumby is thrown into the spotlight when one of the most important paintings of the twentieth century, The Barns of Lumby, is stolen. Town matriarch Charlotte Ross has a very personal connection to the painting-and to the artist, Dana Porter. And as a media frenzy descends on the little town, one of the actual barns disappears overnight from the rural landscape-and pieces of it begin showing up in the strangest places.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

The second installment in a series set in the bucolic Pacific Northwest town of Lumby picks up where The Lumby Linesleft off, with Pam Walker bemused by husband Mark's horticultural foibles and attempts at animal husbandry as the two struggle to turn a profit at their new inn. But when the painting The Barns of Lumbyby the esteemed Dana Porter is stolen, the quiet town suddenly finds itself in the media spotlight. A slew of journalists descend and shake things up for everyone, especially young widow Katie Banks, the owner of the barns depicted in the painting. Katie is suspicious of journalists, but in spite of her skepticism, Katie is drawn into a romance with Adam Massey, a journalist who is also writing a biography of Dana. Other subplots include a monastery that makes a popular gourmet rum sauce and the sinister maneuverings of Norris Fiddler, the New York-based media conglomerate CEO owner of the stolen painting. There's a "gee- whiz, gosh-darn-it" quality to the writing that lends an unrushed, meandering feel to the narrative as evildoers are dispatched and equilibrium is restored. Fraser's story is pleasantly easy reading and as smalltown cozy as they come. (Sept.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780451222084
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
09/04/2007
Series:
Lumby Series, #2
Pages:
352
Sales rank:
666,750
Product dimensions:
8.24(w) x 5.36(h) x 0.76(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Gail Fraser, author of The Lumby Lines, Stealing Lumby, and Lumby’s Bounty, continues to work full time on her acclaimed series about the extraordinary town of Lumby. She and her husband, artist Art Poulin, live with their beloved animals on Lazy Goose Farm in rural upstate New York. When not writing, Gail tends to their garden, orchard and beehives. Gail and Art feel fortunate to be down the road from their close friends at New Skete Monastery, who are the authors of How to be Your Dogs Best Friend.

Prior to becoming a novelist, Gail had a successful corporate career, holding senior-executive positions in several corporations. She has a BA from Skidmore College and an MBA from the University of Connecticut, with graduate work done at Harvard University.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Stealing Lumby (Lumby Series #2) 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
CheliD More than 1 year ago
In the second installment of the Lumby series, the little town of Lumby is thrown into an upheaval when the priceless painting of the Barns of Lumby (considered a national treasure) by Dana Porter is stolen while in transit to the London Museum. Reporters descend on the town to get background for the story of the year. Mark and Pam Walker's B&B is filled to capacity by the reporters who arrived determined to drag out any little jmorsel of scandal that can even remotely be associated with the theft to garner "a scoop". However, Lumby and its residents stand firm in their uniqueness and eventually the reporting mass sinks away. While the story centers on the art theft and its effects on the town's inhabitants, the reader is introduced to a few new characters. The reader is also reminded of the unusual locale with little scraps of information throughout about Hank, the plastic flamingo, saving a little girl from drowning, the travels of a stone Owl to the Space Needle in Seattle and the Opera House in Sydney, the renovation of a bus stop including skylight, sofa and carpeting, a farm powered by cow manure, and a boat "sailing" down Main Street. The most amazing part is the truthfulness of lines such as "from the Lumby Lines (the town newspaper) that it's almost unbelievable that we live in the same country. Their stories (Comparison to NY Times) cover stolen pension funds and murders, and ours are about wiener-dog races and a bovine Iditarod." These characters just see life in an entirely different genuineness which is why the series is so delightful to read and make you want to just laugh out loud. I wish the town Lumby really existed because I'd love to visit not just in books but in actuality. I was worried that the second book would not be able to live up to the playful scenario that was depicted in the first book, The Lumby Lines. No problem here, the residents in the town just picked up where they left off and continued to amuse and delight this reader.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Great read by a new author. Really one should be sure to real Lumby Lines first so know the quirky characters in this quirky little town.