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Stealing the Network: How to Own a Continent
     

Stealing the Network: How to Own a Continent

by Ryan Russell, Joe Grand, Tom Craig, Kevin Mitnick
 

This is a book that will create enormous debate within the technical and the counter-terrorism communities. While there will be the inevitable criticism that the material contained in the book could be used maliciously, the fact is that this knowledge is already in the hands of our enemies. This book is truly designed to inform while entertaining (and scaring) the

Overview

This is a book that will create enormous debate within the technical and the counter-terrorism communities. While there will be the inevitable criticism that the material contained in the book could be used maliciously, the fact is that this knowledge is already in the hands of our enemies. This book is truly designed to inform while entertaining (and scaring) the reader, and it will instantly be in demand by readers of "Stealing the Network: How to Own the Box"

• A meticulously detailed and technically accurate work of fiction that exposes the very real possibilities of such an event occurring
• An informative and scary insight into the boundries of hacking and cyber-terrorism
• Written by a team of the most accomplished cyber-security specialists in the world

Editorial Reviews

bn.com
The Barnes & Noble Review
Hacking. It’s one thing to own a box. But what if you could own a whole continent? That’s the terrifying premise of this book. Call it fiction, if it makes you feel better. The plot is fiction. The continent is fiction. But the hacks and cracks are very real.

Imagine a continent suddenly emerging as an economic, political, and military force. Imagine the shadowy forces who are not pleased. This book is about what happens next...

It starts with three simple hacks. In Reykjavik, legendary blackhat “The Don” is requested to compromise a cellphone switch in Mauritius, trace calls made to and from one phone, then disconnect the line. A community college student in South Africa is asked to compromise a hospital network and change one patient’s blood type. A hacker travels to Lagos to compromise network security at Nigeria’s largest crude oil exporter. Who’s hiring them? What do they want? The tale begins, the events are set in motion...

Stealing the Network: How to Own a Continent was written by a remarkable team of blackhats, whitehats, and cyberterrorism experts. Among them: Fyodor (hackers know his Nmap security scanner, or perhaps you noticed it in Matrix Reloaded). Ryan Russell, a.k.a. Blue Boar, who founded the vuln-dev maillist. Dan Kaminsky, a.k.a. Effugas. Joe Grand, former member of The L0pht. You know they know their hacks. The surprise: This is a great read, too. You won’t be able to put it down. Bill Camarda

Bill Camarda is a consultant, writer, and web/multimedia content developer. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2003 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks for Dummies, Second Edition.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781931836050
Publisher:
Elsevier Science
Publication date:
06/23/2004
Series:
Cyber-Fiction Series
Pages:
498
Sales rank:
1,181,083
Product dimensions:
0.88(w) x 10.00(h) x 7.00(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Day minus 300

With preparations done, I can begin my work. I have purposely avoided planning what to do until now. The minute you plan a crime, you start to leave behind evidence that you're planning it. I have waited until I have a secure environment to plan any specifics, to record anything, or to perform any specific calculations. I have set a date of April 15 to disappear and begin to take possession of the funds. This is 300 days away.

The most reliable way to obtain money is to steal it. Your efforts either work or they don't. Your only risk is getting caught. I have access to commercial investment research tools. Bloomberg, LexisNexis, press releases, and so on. These are accessed through a set of anonymizing efforts, like any other traffic I generate. If you're going to make someone analyze your traffic, you make them analyze all of it. You don't make it easy for them by only treating important traffic differently.

What I need are institutions that have money. I also need institutions that can't defend and detect well. Somewhere in there is the crossover point that tells me which are of use to me and will be the easiest to hit. Africa. The countries there are often in a state of flux, governments and borders come and go, they have poor computer crime laws and little investigative experience, and poorly-formed extradition and information sharing policies. But they get to play in the international money markets.

I decided that African financial institutions would be either the source or the middleman for all my transactions. To make this effective, an amazing amound of control over the computers for those institutions would be required, which is what I will be arranging. Once obtained, the money would have to be filtered through enough sieves so that it can find me, but that the people following the money can't find me.

There is very little real money anymore, the paper and metal stuff. Money is now a liquid flow of bits that respect no boundaries. If you want to steal money, you simply siphon off some of the bits. The bits leaves a glowing trail, so you have to make sure the trail can't be followed.

The international banks move several times the amound of actual money in the world every day. That means they just move the same money over and over again. There are a few ways to make the trails go away. One is to make the trail visible, but not worth following. Would Citibank publicize a $10 million loss again, given the choice? Another way is to make sure the trail leads to someone else. A third is to create a series of false trails.

Science fiction writers have been writing stories about killer machines and computers taking over the world for 50 years. The future often arrives on schedule; we just don't see it for what it is. We've had human-controlled killing machines for many years, we call them cars. Computers control every aspect of your life. If the computers all agree you don't own your house, then you get evicted. If they say you are a wanted man, you go to jail. The people with the skills to make all of these things happen are out there, they just aren't organized. They aren't motivated.

I know my way around computers, but I am not an expert in all the vertical security areas. It's simply not worth my time to be. Instead, I can "employ" those who are. My skills are organizational, you can think of me as a systems integrator.

Meet the Author

Additional authors for this title include:

  • 131ah
  • Jay Beale
  • FX
  • Paul Craig
  • Timothy Mullen
  • Tom Parker

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