Steampunk III: Steampunk Revolution

( 1 )

Overview


Playfully mashing up the romantic elegance of the Victorian era with whimsically modernized technology, the wildly popular steampunk genre is here to stay. Now...long live the revolution!

Steampunk Revolution features a renegade collective of writers and artists, including steampunk legends and hot, new talents rebooting the steam-driven past and powering it into the future. Lev Grossman’s “Sir Ranulph Wykeham-Rackham, GBE, a.k.a. Roboticus the All-Knowing” is the ...

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Overview


Playfully mashing up the romantic elegance of the Victorian era with whimsically modernized technology, the wildly popular steampunk genre is here to stay. Now...long live the revolution!

Steampunk Revolution features a renegade collective of writers and artists, including steampunk legends and hot, new talents rebooting the steam-driven past and powering it into the future. Lev Grossman’s “Sir Ranulph Wykeham-Rackham, GBE, a.k.a. Roboticus the All-Knowing” is the Six-Million-Dollar Steampunk Man, possessing appendages and workings recycled from metal parts, yet also fully human, resilient, and determined. Bruce Sterling’s “White Fungus” introduces steampunk’s younger cousin, salvage-punk, speculating on how cities will be built in the future using preexisting materials. Cat Valente’s “Mother Is a Machine” explores the merging of man and machine and a whole new form of parenting. In Jeff VanderMeer’s anti-steampunk story “Fixing Hanover,” a creator must turn his back on his creation because it is so utterly destructive. And Cherie Priest presents “The Clockroach,” a new and very unsettling mode of transportation.

Going far beyond corsets and goggles, Steampunk Revolution is not just your granddad’s zeppelin—it’s an even wilder ride.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
VanderMeer’s follow-up to previous similarly themed anthologies targets established fans of the retro-infatuated steampunk movement. In addition to four nonfiction pieces by gnere luminaries such as Jaymee Goh of “Silver Goggles” fame, including Margaret Killjoy’s “Steampunk Shapes Our Future,” the collection offers 28 stories, several of them standouts. In Ben Peek’s ”Possession,” a botanist trying to regenerate soil in the Earth’s crust discovers a dying female android, while Karin Tidbeck’s sad, whimsical “Beatrice” relates a tale of love between man and airship. Vandana Singh’s “A Handful of Rice” entertains with its alternate history of India. Technology runs amok in Jeff VanderMeer’s “Fixing Hanover,” in which inventors suffer unintended consequences from their creations, and in Christopher Barzak’s surreal “Smoke City,” about an urban industrial hell. Readers who enjoy steampunk largely for its visual aesthetic or use in other genres like YA and mystery may find less appeal in a collection geared mostly toward hardcore devotees. (Dec.)
From the Publisher

“Steampunk isn’t just about Victorians playing with cogs and gears; these stories (and a few essays) reveal some of the latest steps in this branch of speculative fiction’s evolution.”
Shelf Awareness

“VanderMeer’s follow-up to previous similarly themed anthologies targets established fans of the retro-infatuated steampunk movement.”
Publishers Weekly

“This third volume of the acclaimed Steampunk anthology series features an international cast of authors and a revolutionary take on the wonders of Steam. As steampunk continues to gain in popularity, these new tales and fresh tropes from established steampunk storytellers and new exciting talents reconcile Victorian pleasantries with passionate ideologies, reinvigorating the genre.”
Books World

“Demonstrates the power of a well-orchestrated collection...a must-have for any fan of the subgenre.”
Beyond Victoriana

“The 27 stories gathered here are therefore noteworthy both because of their subject matter as well as for the way they stretch the stylistics of Steampunk in new and different directions.”
Bookgasm
“These stories have something everyone can enjoy.”
SF Site

Library Journal
In this third anthology focusing on the fast-evolving genre of steampunk (Steampunk; Steampunk Reloaded), contributor Margaret Killjoy writes in an essay, “Steampunk offers a level-headed (and top-hatted) critique of modernity.” Along with four essays, the 39 stories of retrofuturism vary widely in theme, setting, and prose style, inviting a wider definition of the term steampunk. Some interweave closely with fictional history (e.g., “The Stoker Memorandum”) or with actual history. Other tales involve everything from flight engineers in the Philippines to a mystic spaceship in ancient Hindustan, from contraband cars to a brass-bound postapocalyptic landscape. Readers will also meet a cyborg queen in Peking’s Forbidden City, a criminal–turned–defender of art’s beauty, living aircraft, and disturbing dream artificers. There’s even advice from a literary squid.

Verdict Those already familiar with the steampunk basics will welcome this new addition, which expands this subgenre’s borders and helps readers examine technology and society.—Sara Schepis, East Fishkill Community Lib., Hopewell Junction, NY(c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781616960865
  • Publisher: Tachyon Publications
  • Publication date: 10/5/2012
  • Series: Steampunk Series
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 1,364,502
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 3.30 (d)

Meet the Author


Ann VanderMeer is the Hugo Award–winning editor of Weird Fiction Review. She was the fiction editor at Weird Tales and the publisher of Buzzcity Press, work for which received the British Fantasy, International Horror Guild, and Rhysling awards. An expert on Victoriana, she is the co-editor of the bestselling World Fantasy Award–nominated Steampunk series. Her other anthologies include the Best American Fantasy and Leviathan series, The Thackery T. Lambshead Pocket Guide to Eccentric & Discredited Diseases, The New Weird, and Last Drink, Bird Head.
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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2014

    `&beta&epsilon<_>g&iota&eta&eta&iota&eta<_>g &sigmaƒ &delta&tau&epsilon&alpha<_>m&rho&upsilon&eta&kappa &sigma&eta &epsilon&alpha<_>r&tau<_>h`

    Right after the Industrial Revolution happened in London, a civil war broke out. Some rebelled against the monarchy while the others fought for them.
    <p>
    A particular man, who shall not be named, least his heritage be shamed for his acts, was a genius; he was an inventor, as well.
    <p>
    He created useful household objects that made life easier, usually, but when the war broke out and he lost his eldest son to it, he began to turn his creations to arms. He supported the rebels, so he gave his new weapons to them. It was a costly mistake...
    <p>
    He created a bomb so powerful, it would tear the ground apart and kill everything in a certain radius. Without question, the rebels used it; its power was despairingly underestimated.
    <p>
    It distrupted the entire world, sending great cracks through the crust. The ocean flooded them, toppling great mountains and filling the skies with dust and debris.
    <p>
    When it finally settled, only a handful of people survived. They were shocked and disdraught at what mankind had done. They rounded up the remaining animals and people and began to rebuild... A city in the clouds...
    <p>
    They used airships to travel around; some of the best pilots in the history of humankind were born. Life began to become a joy again...

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