Stellaluna

( 36 )

Overview

Knocked from her mother’s safe embrace by an attacking owl, Stellaluna lands headfirst in a bird’s nest. This adorable baby fruit bat’s world is literally turned upside down when she is adopted by the occupants of the nest and adapts to their peculiar bird habits. Two pages of notes at the end of the story provide factual information about bats. “Delightful and informative but never didactic; a splendid debut.”--Kirkus Reviews

After she falls headfirst into a bird's ...

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Overview

Knocked from her mother’s safe embrace by an attacking owl, Stellaluna lands headfirst in a bird’s nest. This adorable baby fruit bat’s world is literally turned upside down when she is adopted by the occupants of the nest and adapts to their peculiar bird habits. Two pages of notes at the end of the story provide factual information about bats. “Delightful and informative but never didactic; a splendid debut.”--Kirkus Reviews

After she falls headfirst into a bird's nest, a baby bat is raised like a bird until she is reunited with her mother.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Stellaluna, a little brown bat, is accidentally dropped by her mother. The helpless baby falls smack into a nest of bird fledglings, and is immediately accepted as one of the family. Stellaluna tries to fit in, but keeps acting unbirdlike; hanging upside down and wanting to fly at night. By chance Stellaluna is reunited with her mother and finally learns to be proper bat. Cannon's breathtaking illustrations make this a gift-giving favorite.
From the Publisher

[set star]"Delightful and informative but never didactic."--Kirkus Reviews (starred)
 
Children's Literature - Beverly Kobrin
Read aloud or recommend Stellaluna for fictional perspectives on bats. In this tale, which concludes with two pages of facts about the flying mammals, a baby fruit bat is adopted by birds.
School Library Journal
With Janell Cannon's popular picture book as its main feature, this recording includes other stories on bats as wellHattie, the Backstage Bat by Don Freeman and narrator David Holt's version of Why the Bats Fly at Night. There's also a short, factual account of bats, followed by "Stellaluna's Theme," a brief piece of music that sounds like a folk lullaby. To hear Stellaluna read aloud is to realize just how much the illustrations contribute to its appeal in book form; it simply doesn't do well orally, despite David Holt's enthusiastic efforts. The other selections, accompanied by dim, disjointed strains of music, don't fare much betterespecially the part about "amazing bat facts" in which children are urged to set up their own bat houses in order to reduce the numbers of annoying insects in the air. "Wouldn't it be nice to have Stellaluna in your backyard?," Holt asks earnestly. Alas, his facts are wrong. Stellaluna doesn't eat insects; as a fruit bat she eats fruit. Those wishing to educate children about bats are advised to skip this effort in favor of the growing numbers of fine books on the subject.-Carol Katz, Harrison Public Library, NY
Chris Sherman
After Stellaluna and her mother are attacked by an owl, the tiny fruit bat lands headfirst in a bird's nest. The mother bird allows Stellaluna to stay, as long as Stellaluna doesn't teach the bird babies bad tricks--like hanging upside down from the nest to sleep. Stellaluna wants to be as graceful as the baby birds, but she's graceful only when she's flying. A bat discovers Stellaluna, who's been separated from the birds, sleeping wrong end up. It calls other bats to see this strange little creature, and a very happy Stellaluna is reunited with her mother to learn proper bat behavior. When the birds visit Stellaluna's bat family, the little bat discovers that baby birds are as clumsy at being bats as Stellaluna was at trying to be a bird. Cannon's delightful story is full of gentle humor, and even young children will understand the little bat's need to fit in. Cannon provides good information about bats in the story, amplifying it in two pages of notes at the end of the book. Her full-page colored-pencil-and-acrylic paintings fairly glow: Stellaluna's depiction reflects the starlight and moonlight of the bat's name, and the pictures of the creature hauling herself onto a limb, hanging by her thumbs, and "joy-flying" are truly amusing. The facing pages of text include small, charming ink sketches that show what happens as Stellaluna's mother searches for her baby.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780152062873
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 8/1/2007
  • Pages: 42
  • Sales rank: 123,553
  • Age range: 3 months - 3 years
  • Lexile: AD550L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 7.60 (w) x 7.60 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Janell Cannon's picture books have won many awards and are beloved around the world. Before she became a full-time creator of books for children, she designed and produced summer reading programs at her local public library. Born and raised in Minnesota, Ms. Cannon now lives in Southern California.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 36 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(26)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 36 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 19, 2013

    I've been fascinated by bats, especially fruit bats, for a while

    I've been fascinated by bats, especially fruit bats, for a while, but until Stellaluna came out, I'm pretty sure not too many children were. Now I know that Stellaluna is a well-circulated book at the library and on one of the library's computers as a game. Bats no longer elicit an automatic scream, at least not the ones that are as charmingly illustrated as Janell Cannon's.
    In addition to showing bats in a rather flattering light, Stellaluna is about the importance of family and making friends -- timeless and appropriate themes for a children's book.
    If you haven't read Stellaluna, you should, if only to see the cutest little bats ever.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 9, 2011

    great story

    it should be offered on nook

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  • Posted January 30, 2010

    Children's Book Stellaluna

    I purchased this book for my 6 year old granddaughter. Her family situation is like many others, in that, her parents are divorced. Her family is now a blended family, father and brother married a woman with a daughter, and now they have a daughter together. Many changes have occurred. While my granddaughter feels loved and very much a part of her new family, reading about how Stellaluna adjusted to new friends and a redefinition of her new family is comforting.

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  • Posted December 19, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Different is ok.

    Stellaluna is a wonderful story about a baby bat, separated from her mother, and brought up by a bird family. She tries to be a bird. Her bird brothers and sister don't understand why Stellaluna can't do the things they can do. When she finds her mother, she discovers her natural talents. She doesn't understand that her bird family can't do the things that she can do. They are different on so many levels but they are the same on others. Acceptance of others, acceptance of different is the important lesson here. I read this book to all of my children and it was one of their favorites that we read over and over again.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2009

    Great bat book

    This book is a great fictional book that gives children to look at the characteristics of a bird and a bat to compare the two. The book is veery easy to read and children enjoy it

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 18, 2009

    Good for bedtime

    Its a nice story for bedtime my daughter loves to hear and something I'm sure as she grows up wil be able to connect with on some levels.

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  • Posted February 23, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Stellaluna great for teaching kids about differences

    This book is a great conversation starter for talking about how people are different, and how they are the same

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2008

    amazingg!

    i absolutely love this book! i was young when my mom bought me this book at my school's book fair and ive loved it since. im 14 right now and i still enjoy reading it. it has to be one of my favorite books, and trust me, ive read A LOT of books! :)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2007

    A reviewer

    I have compiled a list of popular and/or award winning books to read my boys. I will buy this book for their library. It shows that 'people' can be different and yet the same. The illustrations are amazing! I highly recommend this book for a toddler.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2007

    Great book for kids

    This book is really cute and I love the illustrations. Makes a great standard gift for someone you know is having a baby. Same goes for anything else by Janell Cannon, I really like Verdi and Pinduli as well.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2007

    A modern-day classic

    I took this book and cd-rom from the library and read them with my child. He read along with the cd-rom by himself. This is a great and informative story of a lost young bat's search for mom.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2007

    The best of the year

    this book is mostly about a bat named Stellaluna. Most of the book Stellaluna is raised by a mother bird. The 3 baby birds and Stellaluna learn how to fly and Stellaluna gets lost and stuck in a tree. You should get this book if you like the best of the year tpye books. I like this book because the bat was daring and courous.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2004

    From a Reader

    I'm a freshman in highschool now, but I grew up with this as my favorite children's book. The artwork always catches my attention, and I adore the soft colors and sweet story. By seeing a friend's drawing of a fruit bat, it reminded me of this book, and I looked it up again. I really would recommend this book to anyone, as even after these years I've still remembered it (and still have it, I hope to save it for my own children one day). Stellaluna looks so soft in the artwork you really would just want to hug her.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2002

    A diversity 'manual' for all ages, races, etc.

    As a State employee, I've had diversity training ad nausuem. Stellaluna says everything the boring classes try to teach us, but Stellaluna is an honest & gentle teacher. This book should be required reading for all diversity trainers & trainees.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2001

    A Story about acceptance

    Beautifully illustrated and delightfully told tale of a little fruit bat who tries to be a bird. Not as brightly colorful as Crickwing, but still a great story.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2000

    VERY SWEET

    This is a very cute book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2000

    Wonderful Book!

    Stelluna is one of my daughters favorite books. This is a great book to read outloud. The storyline is simple enough for 3 and 4 year olds to follow, yet complex enough to keep a 5 or 6 year old interested--I was interested. The illustrations are adorable! Stellaluna is about being different, yet still being friends. I love how Stellaluna has to make a choice of abiding by mamma birds nest rules or going her own way. So Stellaluna stops making faces when eating bugs. Stelluna is a fruit bat, only later does she learn she's not supposed to eat bugs and fly in the daytime or hang by her thumbs. A wonderful book!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2000

    Greaaattt Illustrations....Beautifully written

    What else can I say? This story is both cute in it's text and it has adorable illustrations. Just a great book for toddlers and younger children, but the story could warm anyone's heart!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 36 Customer Reviews

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