Step into a World: A Global Anthology of the New Black Literature / Edition 1

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 96%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (28) from $1.99   
  • Used (28) from $1.99   

Overview

Step Into A World

"Kevin Powell is pushing to bring, as he has so brilliantly done before, the voices of his generation: the concerns, the cares, the fears, and the fearlessness. Step into a World is a kaleidoscope into the world not bound by artificial constructs like nation. John Coltrane recorded ‘Giant Steps,’ which is a riff on the sight and sounds in his muse. Powell plays the computer with equal astuteness." –Nikki Giovanni

"Those of us who pay attention were aware that the younger generation of black writers was being smothered by the anointment of talented tenth Divas and Divuses, and their commercial accommodationist ‘Fourth Renaissance. ’This anthology is indeed a breakthrough! It combines the boldness and daring of hip-hop with the intellectual keenness of a Michele Wallace or a Clyde Taylor." –Ishmael Reed

"In a culture where videos, the Internet, and other high-tech communication is being consumed like the latest mind-altering drug, how does great literature grow and survive? These writers will answer that all-important question. This anthology provides a clue, a hint, as to where we might be going. They are resisting all this vacant, empty-minded nothingness. Read them. Listen to them. If you don’t, you do so at your peril." –Quincy Troupe

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Poet and journalist Powell (Keepin 'It Real, 1997) is one of the most audible and outspoken advocates of the young black literary voice on the scene today. He has here assembled the essays, fiction, poetry, criticism, and journalism of more than 100 young writers. Although of predictably variable quality, most entries are engaging and provocative, with stand-out work by Malcolm Gladwell ("The Sports Taboo: Why Blacks are Like Boys and Whites are Like Girls"), Daphne Brooks (a critical piece on Oprah's book club), Erin Aubrey (a consideration of Ebonics), Scott Poulson-Bryant (an insightful article on Sean "Puffy" Combs), and the very beautiful and often disturbing fiction of such talents as Junot Diaz, Christopher John Farley, John Keene, Victor D. La Valle, Phylis Alesia Perry, and Bernardine Evaristo. Considering a wide range of subjects (including sexuality, violence, feminism, linguistics, politics, prostitution, music, love, media, and spirituality), these short works are linked only by the racial origins of their authors. Powell's decision to alphabetize entries within categories serves to reiterate this lack of overriding theme and to emphasize the infinite range and flexibility of this, the new world of black writers.
A fascinating collection of work from established authors and bold new voices.
--Kirkus Reviews, November 2000

This anthology of young, contemporary black writers generally maintains a precarious balance between authentic discovery and promotional marketing, although the writing varies widely in quality and relevance (some selections are quite riveting, others just self- absorbed). Divided into six sections- "Essays," "Hip-Hop Journalism," "Criticism," "Fiction," "Poetry," and "Dialogue"- the collection presents a broad range of voices and perspectives, although a majority of them are, not surprisingly, from the United States. While some of the texts, particularly those on hip- hop, seem overly dramatic and hyperbolic, some very fine writing emerges in the "Essays" section. Mostly autobiographical, these selections address the very real contemporary problems of black identity in a post civil Rights era in which the political battle lines have become much more blurred and the issues of self, nation, class, gender, sexuality, and history are immensely complicated. The items in the "Dialogue" section are the most strident and the most inventive and compelling. Even through this book will mainly be used as a classroom textbook, it could be a valuable addition to larger collections and other libraries interested in offering brief introductions to young black writers.

-Roger A. Berger, Everett Community Coll., WA
Library Journal
November 15, 2000

Patrick Henry Bass
Cultural critic Kevin Powell's Step into a World is a watershed moment in hip-hop writing, a thought-provoking book with a broad range of voices, from Ben Okri to Junot Didaz.
Essence
Library Journal
This anthology of young, contemporary black writers generally maintains a precarious balance between authentic discovery and promotional marketing, although the writing varies widely in quality and relevance (some selections are quite riveting, others just self-absorbed). Divided into six sections--"Essays," "Hip-Hop Journalism," "Criticism," "Fiction," "Poetry," and "Dialogue"--the collection presents a broad range of voices and perspectives, although a majority of them are, not surprisingly, from the United States. While some of the texts, particularly those on hip-hop, seem overly dramatic and hyperbolic, some very fine writing emerges in the "Essays" section. Mostly autobiographical, these selections address the very real contemporary problems of black identity in a post-Civil Rights era in which the political battle lines have become much more blurred and the issues of self, nation, class, gender, sexuality, and history are immensely complicated. The items in the "Dialogue" section are the most strident and the most inventive and compelling. Even though this book will mainly be used as a classroom textbook, it could be a valuable addition to larger collections and other libraries interested in offering brief introductions to young black writers.--Roger A. Berger, Everett Community Coll., WA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780471380603
  • Publisher: Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 10/16/2000
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 496
  • Product dimensions: 6.48 (w) x 9.55 (h) x 1.48 (d)

Meet the Author

KEVIN POWELL is a critically acclaimed poet, journalist, essayist, and public speaker. A former senior writer for Vibe, he has been published in dozens of periodicals, including the Washington Post, Essence, Code, Rolling Stone, the New York Times, George, Ms., and voter.com.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Partial table of contents:

ESSAYS.

Donnell Alexander: Are Black People Cooler than White People?

Hilton Als: GWTW.

Valerie Boyd: In Search of Alice Walker.

Veronica Chambers: Mama's Girl.

Trey Ellis: The Visible Man.

Ekow Eshun: Return to the Planet of the Apes.

Lisa Jones: Are We Tiger Woods Yet?

Bruce Morrow: She and I.

Lonnae O'Neal Parker: White Girl?

Natasha Tarpley: Texaco.

Toure: Speaking in Tongues.

Daniel J. Wideman: Your Friendly Neighborhood Jungle.

HIP-HOP JOURNALISM.

Harry Allen: Hip-Hop Hi-Tech.

Cheo Hodari Coker: The Death of Rock n' Roll.

Joan Morgan: hip-hop feminist.

Scott Poulson-Bryant: This Is Not a Puff Piece.

Kevin Powell: Live from Death Row.

CRITICISM.

Jabari Asim: Angles of Vision.

Erin Aubry: The Soul of Black Talk.

Kevin Baldeosingh: Do Books Matter?

Debra Dickerson: She's Gotta Have It.

Lynell George: No Entry.

Esther Iverem: What About Black Romance?

FICTION.

Paul Beatty: The White Boy Shuffle.

Junot Diaz: The Sun, the Moon, the Stars.

Tananarive Due: Prologue, 1963.

Bernardine Evaristo: The Emperor's Babe.

Christopher John Farley: the missionary position.

John R. Keene: My Son, My Heart, My Life.

Jake Lamar: The Last Integrationist.

Victor D. LaValle: slave.

Ben Okri: The Famished Road.

Phyllis Alesia Perry: Stigmata.

Patricia Powell: The Pagoda.

Lisa Teasley: Baker.

Jervey Tervalon: Rika.

POETRY.

Toyin Adewale: Safari.

Elizabeth Alexander: Fugue.

Jeffery Renard Allen: The Clearing.

Charlie Braxton: I Dream of Jesus.

Shonda Buchanan: personal.

Adrian Castro: One Irony of the Caribbean.

Wayde Compton: Legba, Landed.

Nikky Finney: Assam.

Brian Gilmore: swampy river.

Duriel E. Harris: from "Awakening".

Yona Harvey: Sleep.

Ogaga Ifowodo: You Are Chic Now, Che.

Arnold J. Kemp: 100 Times.

Jessica Care Moore: The Outcome.

Samwiri Mukuru: Nairobi Streetlights.

G. E. Patterson: Autobiography of a Black Man.

Carl Phillips: Blue.

Rohan Preston: Patrimony.

Vanessa Richards: Calypso the outside woman.

Kristina Rungano: The Woman.

Angela Shannon: Sunday.

Renee Simms: Purple Impala.

Patrick Sylvain: Windows of Exile.

Natasha Tretheway: Collection Day.

Marco Villalobos: Insomnia.

DIALOGUE.

Ras Baraka: Black Youth Black Art Black Face--An Address.

Tisa Bryant: we are trying to ?(have me) conceive.

Cege Githiora: Binga--Diary Entry.

Sarah Jones: Just Beneath the Surface--An Email.

Teresa N. Washington: An Atlantic Away: A Letter from Africa.

Contributors.

Self-Portrait: Radcliffe Bailey, the Cover Artist.

Selected Bibliography of Black Literature.

Books Essential to Understanding Hip-Hop Culture.

Permissions.

Index.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2001

    Required Reading for Serious Students of Black Literature

    It's an incredible shame that I am the first to write a review about this book here at barne's and noble's. This work, is a serious exploration of the finest black essays, short ficiton, poetry, and for the first time, hip-hop journalism, the Afrikan Diaspora has to offer. Even the intro to the book, entitled 'The Word Movement' is an asset to global black literature. In it, Powell articulates both the exhiliration and the frustration shared by many of the widely read intellecutals of his generation share regarding the new black literature with critical finesse. But to the careful reader, he also gives a recipe to success and longevity to those who seek to enter the world of black writing. Intentionally or not, he conveys an understanding of how to advance as a writer of afrikan descent without imitating fads or losing one's authentic voice. The resulting combined power of our generation's voices in the works that follow makes this collection one of the most important works to have in a contemporary black collection.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)