Steppenwolf

Steppenwolf

4.0 3
by Thomas Wayne
     
 

This classic is a particular favorite of young adults confronting life's deepest questions. A potent combination of Eastern and Western insights into the human search for meaning, Thomas Wayne presents a contemporary take on Hesse's story in a joltingly fresh translation.

Steppenwolf was first published in German in 1927, but the issues it raises are

Overview

This classic is a particular favorite of young adults confronting life's deepest questions. A potent combination of Eastern and Western insights into the human search for meaning, Thomas Wayne presents a contemporary take on Hesse's story in a joltingly fresh translation.

Steppenwolf was first published in German in 1927, but the issues it raises are still relevant today. Perhaps the book is more important in our current cultural climate than ever before. In this story we watch as a solitary individual struggles to break free of the plans and patterns laid out for him by society, the expectations of others, and the soft confines of middle-class life.

The main character, Harry Haller, has all material wealth he needs, yet he finds no satisfaction. Having decided to commit suicide on his fiftieth birthday, he then meets Hermine. She shows him another life and, through her musician/friend Pablo and his Magic Theater, all the endless possible variations of his own life in the long journey to self-discovery.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

While it's good for a titter to picture Peter Weller in full RoboCop gear reading Hesse's classic novel of intellectual absorption with the primeval, it is not entirely necessary for full appreciation of his reading. Weller, who has a Midwestern folksy personability, reads Hesse less as a work of great literature than a philosophical manual, meant to be studied for personal improvement. Hesse can be forbidding, even for the teenage readers who often discover literature through him, so Weller wisely renders his novel familiar, comfortable and friendly. Currently wrapping up a Ph.D. at UCLA in Italian Renaissance art history, Weller has clearly been taking lessons in sounding professorial-entirely apropos here. (Apr.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780875867854
Publisher:
Algora Publishing
Publication date:
03/01/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
176
File size:
638 KB

Meet the Author

The author, Hermann Hesse, is a poet and novelist known for his stark explorations of the individual's spiritual search and the striving for a life of virtue, justice and understanding within the restrictions of society. Several of Hesse's novels are centered on the protagonist's journey into the inner self, with a spiritual guide assists the hero in his quest for self-knowledge and shows the way beyond the world "deluded by money, number and time." He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1946.

Hesse was born in the German state of Württemberg. His father was born a Russian citizen in Weissenstein, Estonia; his mother spent her early years in Talatscheri, India. Both parents served as missionaries in India, and these diverse cultural currents infuse his writing with unusual flavor.

The translator Thomas Wayne is an English Professor at Edison College in Fort Myers, Florida. He has published two translations of Nietzsche's classics with Algora Publishing, as well as Hesse's much loved Steppenwolf. His approach in translating these iconoclastic German powerhouses is to return the juice the authors originally intended, the verve and dynamic energy. Basil Creighton's 1929 version (revised in 1963 by Joseph Mileck) is the best-known version in English; it skips words, smoothes out long, involved passages, unnecessarily "improves" the text - all things Thomas Wayne refuses to do. As with his already published translations of Nietzsche's Thus Spake Zarathustra, Ecce Homo, and The Antichrist, he emphasizes a strict adherence and reverence for the literal - a Hesse for the 21st century, meaningful and faithful to the original.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Steppenwolf 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book isnt for the simple minded, you have to examin the meaning herman is trying to tell you behind his words.