The Sticky Doll Trap

The Sticky Doll Trap

by Jessica Souhami
     
 

Hare is a cheeky rascal who prefers to have a nap while the other animals are scratching in the earth searching for water. Hare tricks Monkey and then Hyena into shutting their eyes tight while he fills his calabash with the newly-found water and scampers away. By now, the animals are angry, and decide to have their own back. They make a huge, gummy, sticky doll,

Overview


Hare is a cheeky rascal who prefers to have a nap while the other animals are scratching in the earth searching for water. Hare tricks Monkey and then Hyena into shutting their eyes tight while he fills his calabash with the newly-found water and scampers away. By now, the animals are angry, and decide to have their own back. They make a huge, gummy, sticky doll, set it up at the water's edge, and wait...

This traditional trickster tale dates back to the Uncle Remus story of Brer Rabbit and the Tar Baby, and can be found in different versions all over South and West Africa, North and South America - even in a Jataka tale from India. Jessica Souhami has turned a West African version into a comic, read-aloud story accompanied by stunning, brilliantly coloured collage to create a book bursting with fun for very young readers.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
K-Gr 3—Souhami tells her version of the West and South African folktale that most Americans will recognize as "Brer Rabbit and the Tar Baby." One hot summer day, lazy Hare rests while the other animals scratch away at the dry earth until they discover a precious pool of water. Wanting to save the water for the animals who worked for it, Monkey stands guard but is tricked by Hare, who fills his calabash and runs away. After the rascal tricks Hyena, the angry animals collect gum from the rubber trees and make a sticky doll to stand by the pool. As in the Uncle Remus story, the argumentative Hare becomes stuck in the gummy doll but escapes after talking the other animals into throwing him into the spiny, thorny bushes. Bright collages made from Ingres papers hand-painted with watercolor inks and graphite pencil depict the savannah wildlife and horizon. The text is conversational in tone, as told from a storyteller's perspective. This book is a good addition to collections in need of an updated edition or a variant of the popular tale.—Martha Simpson, Stratford Library Association, CT
Kirkus Reviews

Br'er Rabbit's ancestor, the West African rascal Hare, lives in this vividly delineated retelling.

All the animals were searching for water, except for Hare, who was asleep. When they find a clear spring, they decide to guard it from those who didn't work to find it. Monkey is first, but Hare comes by with his empty calabash (a kind of bowl), sticks a finger in it and licks it: "Dee-licious!" Hare tells Monkey to shut his eyes to get a taste, but what Hare does, of course, is steal some water and run away. Hyena gets fooled too, so the animals decide to make a sticky doll to guard the water. Hare tries to fool the doll and gets nicely stuck to it, and while the animals debate what to do with him, he slyly begs not to thrown into the "spiny, thorny bushes." Readers can probably figure out how that ends. The marvelous illustrations are made with hand-painted watercolor Ingres papers patterned in burnished savannah colors. Grass and thorns, birds and leaves and each individual animal are placed against the sand-colored background.

A visually enchanting and aurally engaging retelling of an old, old tale. (author's note)(Picture book/folktale. 5-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781847800176
Publisher:
Frances Lincoln Children's Books
Publication date:
03/01/2011
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
11.10(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.30(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

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