Still the New World: American Literature in a Culture of Creative Destruction

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 95%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (16) from $1.99   
  • New (4) from $29.08   
  • Used (12) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$29.08
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(968)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
1999-05-30 Hardcover New NEW Book with mint cover, clean text, tight binding.

Ships from: Rockford, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$34.50
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(417)

Condition: New
Gift quality. Clean, unmarked pages. Good binding and cover. Hardcover and dust jacket. Ships daily.

Ships from: Boonsboro, MD

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$80.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(113)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$105.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(113)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

In this bold reinterpretation of American culture, Philip Fisher describes generational life as a series of renewed acts of immigration into a new world. Along with the actual flood of immigrants, technological change brings about an immigration of objects and systems, ways of life and techniques for the distribution of ideas.

A provocative new way of accounting for the spirit of literary tradition, Still the New World makes a persuasive argument against the reduction of literature to identity questions of race, gender, and ethnicity. Ranging from roughly 1850 to 1940, when, Fisher argues, the American cultural and economic system was set in place, the book reconsiders key works in the American canon—from Emerson, Whitman, and Melville, to Twain, James, Howells, Dos Passos, and Nathanael West, with insights into such artists as Winslow Homer and Thomas Eakins. With striking clarity, Fisher shows how these artists created and recreated a democratic poetics marked by a rivalry between abstraction, regionalism, and varieties of realism—and in doing so, defined American culture as an ongoing process of creative destruction.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The final sentence of Philip Fishers rich investigation into the American commitment to novelty and innovation has the ring of a campaign promise: This book was written to affirm my conviction that in America in the year 2000 it is still the new world. Fisher, a professor of English at Harvard, has previously published on American literary realism, abstract art and the culture of museums. Here he offers an unexpectedly patriotic analysis of what he describes as Americas lack of culture. If culture, in the anthropological sense, refers to traditional, enduring ways of life handed down from parents to children over multiple generations, Fisher argues, then 19th- and 20th-century America has had nothing of the kind. Instead of culture, we have a culture of creative destruction, perpetual immigration, novelty, innovation, mobility and childrens wise refusal to heed the advice of parents. By immigration Fisher means something much larger than the literal introduction of the nonnative-born to the U.S. Americans have always been immigrants, he asserts, adapting to a permanently unsettled rhythm of creation and destruction. While much of the book, which is written in an epigrammatic style with a minimum of footnotes, is based on Fishers close readings of Walt Whitman, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Mark Twain, Herman Melville, Thomas Eakins and other American authors and artists, his surprising and wide-ranging reflections on the principle of creative destruction in commerce and technology deserve a readership well beyond specialists in American literature and art. (May)
Library Journal
In this provocative look at an ever-changing American society, Fisher (English & American literature, Harvard Univ.) considers how the works of great writers reflect the dynamics of cultural change and assimilation. Using examples from such prominent 19th- and 20th-century authors as Twain, Whitman, and Dos Passos, Fisher shows how American writing has been informed by capitalism, economics, democracy, and the unrelenting rise of technology. For Fisher, the rapid technological advances that have characterized American life in recent generations combine with the ongoing process of immigration to produce an America that is always new. Immigration, with its mix of cultures, becomes not only a way of effecting real change in society but also a metaphor for each generation's "immigration" into a place where skills and knowledge must be constantly updated to keep pace with technology. Recommended for academic and larger library collections, this is an optimistic book that champions American life and literature.--Ellen Sullivan, Ferguson Lib., Stamford, CT Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674838598
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 5/28/1999
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Philip Fisher is the Felice Crowl Reid Professor of English and American Literature at Harvard University.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction 1
Pt. I American Abstraction
1 Democratic Social Space 33
2 Whitman and the Poetics of a Democratic Social Space 56
Pt. II Defecting from American Abstraction
3 Transparency and Obscurity: Melville's Benito Cereno 91
4 Hierarchical Social Space: Twain, James, and Howells 120
Pt. III Regionalism
5 Membership and Identity 153
6 Episodes of Regionalism 171
Pt. IV Realism
7 Realisms of Detail, State, and Voice 191
8 Inventing New Frames For Realism 238
Conclusion 271
Notes 279
Acknowledgments 285
Index 287
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)