Still Unequal

Overview

Still Unequal is a compelling and wide-ranging look at the profound sexism that still pervades the legal system after thirty years of feminist attempts to reform it. Not only is the prejudice of the past written into the law itself, our society continually reinforces it: Women students and faculty at some of the most prestigious law schools are still routinely discriminated against; as lawyers, they face oppressive odds against making partner at the big firms and, amazingly enough, encounter blatant bias in the ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (22) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $5.00   
  • Used (20) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$5.00
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(32)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
1996 Hard cover New in new dust jacket. New... Sewn binding. Cloth over boards. Audience: General/trade.

Ships from: Branson, MO

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$10.00
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(11)

Condition: New
1996 Hard cover First edition. New. No dust jacket as issued. Condition new or as new. gift quality. nice copy. clean, tight, solid, sharp edges and corners. minor sb. shelf ... wear. Fast shipping. Sewn binding. Cloth over boards. Audience: General/trade. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Arthur, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Still Unequal is a compelling and wide-ranging look at the profound sexism that still pervades the legal system after thirty years of feminist attempts to reform it. Not only is the prejudice of the past written into the law itself, our society continually reinforces it: Women students and faculty at some of the most prestigious law schools are still routinely discriminated against; as lawyers, they face oppressive odds against making partner at the big firms and, amazingly enough, encounter blatant bias in the courtroom from judges and opposing counsel. Both students and lawyers often face staggering levels of sexual harassment. Finally, women entering the system through divorce court or as survivors of abuse and rape frequently run up against attitudes we thought had died long ago. Still Unequal proves how far we must still go to rid our system of gender bias at all levels. To support her claim - documented with numerous studies and based on hundreds of interviews - Lorraine Dusky recounts in vivid detail stories involving women from all walks of life, from former professors at Yale to lawyers at white-shoe firms to women fighting for custody of their children to battered women. Dusky makes an overwhelming case for fundamental change in the legal system.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
According to Dusky (How to Eat Like a Thin Person), our legal system is still fundamentally prejudiced against women, despite some reforms achieved by feminists over the last 30 years. In this interesting but overly ambitious analysis, she examines the ways in which law schools contribute to an antiwoman atmosphere by allowing professors to ignore their female students in class, by continuing to use biased law texts and by refusing to grant tenure to women law professors. Drawing on both studies and anecdotal evidence, Dusky describes how the majority of law firms exclude women lawyers from power and often deny them partnershipsand how some foster an atmosphere of sexual harassment. Also included is the author's investigation of the way women's issues such as divorce, rape and domestic violence are treated in the courts. Unfortunately, Dusky doesn't offer a comprehensive treatment of all these subjects. (Nov.)
Library Journal
Dusky examines American legal education, legal practice, and the law and its application and finds all three seriously wanting in the treatment of women. Prompted by a news item about injustices suffered by a divorced mother, Dusky sought out additional examples of sexism and draws sweeping conclusions about the U.S. legal system. While her background as a journalist brings a refreshing perspective, her generalizations and use of extreme situations as representative of the whole substantially weaken her argument. A broader outlook and recognition of the vast differences between the states and of the changes over time could have made her book a valuable and more evenhanded analysis. In addition, this work suffers from what attorneys call "over breadth"; that is, it tries to cover too much. Although Dusky's style will appeal to general readers, her prejudices and occasional inaccuracies make this a marginal purchase.-Suzanne Pierce Dyer, Alameda Cty. Law Lib., Oakland, Cal.
Kirkus Reviews
An extensively researched indictment of the sexism that still pervades our legal system.

Journalist Dusky (author of The Best Companies for Women) looks at the discrimination women on all sides of the law face—whether they are law students, partners or associates in top law firms, judges, mothers and ex-wives in family court, or survivors of rape and domestic abuse. Her portrayal of life for women in law school is drawn from a very small sample (about 70 women from 28 schools). But their shocking evidence, though largely anecdotal, is buttressed by other studies cited by the author—demeaning references to women in textbooks and constant devaluation of feminist ideas in the classroom, arrogant male professors who ignore female students—or fondle them without consent. Sexual harassment at law firms is even worse, Dusky shows. All of this reinforces the far more serious problems women have with the legal system: unfair custody, criminal, and marital laws—and interpretations of law. Dusky's tone is irritating at times; she condescends to the reader with rhetorical setups like "You might think . . . you would be wrong," and she peppers her prose with overly obvious or sweeping statements like, "Men find ways to keep women down." Sometimes, despite her sobering subject, she is funny; illustrating the silly and random ways that gender can pop up in legal codes, she points to an old Kentucky statute mandating that "no female shall appear in a bathing suit on a highway unless she is escorted by at least two officers or armed with a club."

Though her prose style occasionally grates, Dusky makes a persuasive and compelling case for change. This book should be required reading for all first-year law school students—and for any woman contemplating a legal career.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780517593899
  • Publisher: Crown Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 10/15/1996
  • Edition description: 1st Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 452
  • Product dimensions: 6.87 (w) x 9.55 (h) x 1.45 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction 1
1 Legal Education 7
The Rise of a Morally Bankrupt System: Learning to "Think Like a Lawyer" 9
The History of Women in Law Schools: Portia at the Gates 16
Classroom Atmosphere: What Is Wrong with This Picture? 22
Sexual Harassment: Wolves in the Schoolhouse 44
A Tale of Casebook Chauvinism: Women Get No Respect 57
Teaching Rape: What Is (Almost) Everyone Afraid Of? 74
Tenure Travails: Law Schools Are Not Equal Opportunity Employers 84
Harvard: Beirut on the Charles 117
2 Women at the Bar 133
The History of Women Lawyers: The Door Is Slammed Shut ... or Nearly So... 135
Getting Started: Many Are Called... 148
Private Practice: Invited in but Locked Out 161
Bringing Up Baby: The Law and Children 193
Rainmaking: The Last Frontier 208
Law Firm Lust: Sexual Harassment 223
3 The Law and the Courts 249
History of Women's Place in Our Legal Code: In the Beginning ... There Was Sexism... 251
Courtroom Demeanor: Lady Lawyers and 'Gentlemen' Judges 266
Divorce: Breaking up Is Hard to Do 303
Custody: Rights and Rage 336
Domestic Violence: How Many More Women Must Die? 356
Sexual Assault: Rape 377
Conclusion: Still Unequal After All These Years 407
Notes 415
Index 441
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)