Stockings of Buttermilk: American Folktales

Stockings of Buttermilk: American Folktales

by Neil Philip, Jacqueline Mair
     
 


This handsome volume brings together eighteen American stories from eleven states, all of which are based on traditional tales of the European cultures that had the earliest influence on this country-the British Isles, France, Spain, and Germany. Some stories are variants of familiar favorites like "Snow White" ("A Stepchild That Was Treated Mighty Bad"), while… See more details below

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Overview


This handsome volume brings together eighteen American stories from eleven states, all of which are based on traditional tales of the European cultures that had the earliest influence on this country-the British Isles, France, Spain, and Germany. Some stories are variants of familiar favorites like "Snow White" ("A Stepchild That Was Treated Mighty Bad"), while others, like "The Little Bull with the Golden Horns," are less well known; some are funny, some poignant. All share a characteristic freshness, energy, and informality that mark them as purely American. Vividly colored illustrations in the style of American folk art add humor and charm to this collection of lively, colloquial tales-tales that just beg to be read aloud. An authoritative introduction and notes place each in its folkloric context.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"A collection with a difference...watch storytellers and other students of American folklore in search of fresh material fall on it with glad cries." Booklist, ALA

A collection of traditional folktales (from England, Scotland, Ireland, France, Spain, and Germany) that were Americanized by storytellers in the 19th century and early 20th century. Philip, working in a less formal style than American Fairy Tales (1996), includes a Jack and the Beanstalk' from Kentucky, in which the boy is only retrieving his stolen belongings from the giant, King Peacock,' a Snow White variant from Louisiana, Tobe Killed a Bear,' a Missouri variant on part of the Beowulf story, and 13 more. The sources and variations of the stories appear at the end, where Philip also explains how much or little he has revised the tales, his reasoning, and which stories were reprinted untouched. Mair's full-color illustrations, deliberately invoking quilts and pictorial fabrics, suit the subject matter well.
Kirkus Reviews

Sue Stauffacher
Its hard to justify a new collection of folktales when so many are published each year that cover the same ground, but Neil Philip's Stockings of Buttermilk is a notable exception. A folklorist and mythologist, Philip is a respected and original editor of anthologies for young readers. But in Stockings of Buttermilk, the story is gift enough and will make readers and listeners feel as full as if they'd attended the banquet and eaten their fill.
Riverbank Review
Children's Literature - Gisela Jernigan
This lively collection consists of American versions of sixteen folktales originating in the British Isles, France, Germany and Spain. Some are adaptations of familiar tales, such as--Snow White and Jack and the Beanstalk, while others will probably seem new and strange. All, however, have a certain informal and fresh charm, often incorporating regional dialect, rhymes and humor. The length of the tales varies from about ten pages to less than a page, and the state of origin is identified. Bright, folkart illustrations add to the book's appeal. An introduction, further reading list and a special section providing notes on sources and motifs are included.
Kirkus Reviews
A collection of traditional folktales (from England, Scotland, Ireland, France, Spain, and Germany) that were Americanized by storytellers in the 19th century and early 20th century. Philip, working in a less formal style than American Fairy Tales (1996), includes a "Jack and the Beanstalk" from Kentucky, in which the boy is only retrieving his stolen belongings from the giant, "King Peacock," a Snow White variant from Louisiana, "Tobe Killed a Bear," a Missouri variant on part of the Beowulf story, and 13 more. The sources and variations of the stories appear at the end, where Philip also explains how much or little he has revised the tales, his reasoning, and which stories were reprinted untouched. Mair's full-color illustrations, deliberately invoking quilts and pictorial fabrics, suit the subject matter well. (further reading) (Folklore. 9-12)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780395849804
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
09/28/1999
Edition description:
None
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
7.80(w) x 10.27(h) x 0.62(d)
Lexile:
870L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

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