Stoked: A History of Surf Culture

Stoked: A History of Surf Culture

by Drew Kampion
     
 

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Once the sport of Polynesian kings, surfing embodies the ultimate encounter between man and nature. Played out on the beaches and breaking waves of the world's continental fringes, surfing is the epitome of a classic cult of freedom and individual expression-an arena not only for survival but for grace under pressure, style, and artistic invention. Yet surfing is

Overview

Once the sport of Polynesian kings, surfing embodies the ultimate encounter between man and nature. Played out on the beaches and breaking waves of the world's continental fringes, surfing is the epitome of a classic cult of freedom and individual expression-an arena not only for survival but for grace under pressure, style, and artistic invention. Yet surfing is more than just riding the waves-it's a lifestyle, a state of mind, a subculture with its own codes and heroes.

In Stoked: A History of Surf Culture, surf journalist Drew Kampion traces the evolution of the modern beach culture and the challenging, beautiful sport that gave rise to it. From its Polynesian origins and the early days of Duke Kahanamoku's beach boys, to the California-style surfing cult that exploded in the 1960s, to the international pro circuits and radical big-wave contests of today, Stoked tells the compelling story that has inspired entire genres of music, movies, fashion, and art.

Drew Kampion is a writer, editor, and photographer who lives on Whidbey Island near Seattle. He graduated from California State College at Northridge and is a former editor of Surfer, Surfing, and Windsurfer magazines. Kampion is an avid surfer and writes about the sport regularly.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781586852139
Publisher:
Smith, Gibbs Publisher
Publication date:
07/01/2003
Edition description:
Revised
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 1.06(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1

The Seed Culture

"Go to. Strip off your clothes that are a nuisance in this mellow clime. Get in and wrestle with the sea; wing your heels with the skill and power that reside in you; hit the sea's breakers, master them, and ride upon their backs as a king should."

-Jack London, The Cruise of the Snark, 1911

Out of the south they came, paddling their large voyaging canoes-twin-hulled vessels equipped with sails of woven pandanus leaves. They carried men, women, and children, and as many provisions as would fit into the boats. They brought along carefully potted breadfruit, coconut, and pineapple plants, with pigs, dogs, and fowl. They paddled north out of their Polynesian home waters and far into the unknown regions. They crept across the gigantic equatorial waterplain with no sure knowledge of where they were going or what they would find, and when their hopes dimmed and they contemplated retreat, a huge white shark appeared and began to lead them.

The most astute sailors the world has ever known, these Polynesians navigated by stars and wind, and the patterns that wind and land and currents created on the water. Seas generated by storms radiate out in swells. If those swells encounter an island, they refract and bend around it (and also reflect off of it) as they pass. The keen observer can detect the residue of such an encounter many miles later, and these people, ever paddling north, following the migration of the golden plover, following the great shark, were keen observers of such things. According to legend, that first weary but resolved flotilla came out of the vast, near-infinite ocean wilderness of the south to draw directly upon the southernmost tip of the southernmost island of the Hawaiian archipelago, the most remote islands on earth.

Meet the Author

Drew Kampion is the former editor of Surfer, Surfing, Wind Surf, and Wind Tracks magazines. He founded, edited, and published the award-winning Island Independent, and is the author of the best-selling titles Stoked! A History of Surf Culture and Lost Coast: Stories from the Surf. Drew continues to write for magazines dedicated to the surfing life, as well as others. He lives in Washington. He lives in Washington state

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