Stolen in the Night: The True Story of a Family's Murder, a Kidnapping and the Child Who Survived [NOOK Book]

Overview

***Please note: This ebook edition does not contain the photos found in the print edition.***


Joseph Duncan had been convicted of raping and torturing a 14-year-old boy in Tacoma, Washington. On the Internet he proudly boasted of his perversions. But the system turned Duncan loose, and no one would stop him from committing an even more horrifying act...
 
This time, he prepared meticulously. He chose his...

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Stolen in the Night: The True Story of a Family's Murder, a Kidnapping and the Child Who Survived

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Overview

***Please note: This ebook edition does not contain the photos found in the print edition.***


Joseph Duncan had been convicted of raping and torturing a 14-year-old boy in Tacoma, Washington. On the Internet he proudly boasted of his perversions. But the system turned Duncan loose, and no one would stop him from committing an even more horrifying act...
 
This time, he prepared meticulously. He chose his getaway car. He chose his murder weapon and loaded a video camera. Then, when he saw young Shasta and Dylan Groene playing outside their Idaho home, he struck—killing their mother and her boyfriend, and their older brother…and vanishing into the night with Shasta and Dylan. 

Detectives pored over the bloody murder scene. The FBI scrambled to find the children and the abductor. And even when Duncan was finally located, the story was not yet over: Dylan was still missing…and the depth of one man’s evil was still coming horribly to light….

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781429997973
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 2/6/2007
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 56,692
  • File size: 249 KB

Meet the Author

For the last 20 years, author Gary C. King has been one of America’s foremost true crime writers. Over 400 of his stories have appeared in crime magazines across the United States, Canada, and England, including True Detective, Official Detective, Inside Detective, Front Page Detective, and Master Detective. An active member of the Mystery Writers of America, he lives in Las Vegas.

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Read an Excerpt


Stolen in the Night
CHAPTER ONEIDAHO--A STATE PERHAPS BEST KNOWN FOR ITS NATURAL beauty, with a topography that consists of mountains reaching elevations of eight thousand feet or more and areas, like that of Hells Canyon, where the terrain plummets to fifteen hundred feet, or Snake River Canyon, which Evil Knievel tried and failed to jump on his motorcycle. Idaho's scenery is often breathtaking, and recreational opportunities include world-class skiing, kayaking, hiking, backpacking, fishing, whitewater rafting, snowmobiling and snowboarding, to name a few. Noted outdoorsman Ernest Hemingway wrote portions of For Whom the Bell Tolls in Idaho, and in 1961 put a shotgun in his mouth and committed suicide there.Idaho's motto is Esto perpetua, which means It is forever. The principal white settlements were established by the Jesuits in the early 1840s, and nowadays Idaho's family and religious values are heavily influenced by the Mormons, also known as the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In 1992, U.S. Marshals, the FBI and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms agents stormed the home of Randy Weaver because of firearms charges against him, and his purported affiliation with the Idaho-based white supremacy group, Aryan Nations. His wife,Vicki Weaver, and their son, Sammy, were killed in the assault, as was the family dog; when Weaver had his day in court he was acquitted of all the major charges against him, and his case is one that many Idahoans won't let the federal government forget to this day. Even though it cost the Weavers dearly, the people of Idaho generally feel that Randy Weaver and his family were heroic for exercising their individual rights in standing up to the feds.Liberty and freedom are very important to many of Idaho's citizens, and the state's lawmakers rarely create laws that infringe upon individual or property rights. It is also common for residents to own firearms. When all is said and done, it doesn't make much sense that a convicted child molester would make a conscious decision to travel hundreds of miles from the Midwest to a state where his past deeds, if discovered, were not likely to be readily accepted, a region whose conservative residents were not likely to put out the welcome mat and allow him to assimilate into their society. On the other hand, people there tend to mind their own business and are mistrustful of government in general. Joseph Edward Duncan III had no intention of making his past sex crimes known to the state or any of its citizens, so Idaho seemed like the perfect place for him to go to carry out his mission. That is exactly what he did, and in the process his alleged criminal actions would shock and horrify the state, stun the nation and ultimately destroy an entire family. 
 
COEUR D'ALENE, IDAHO, LOCATED IN KOOTENAI COUNTY in the northern panhandle of the state, is an area blessed with natural beauty and a true four-season climate,with each season bringing its own unique splendor. Coeur d'Alene Lake is nearby, as is Lake Pend Oreille, and mountains add to the scenery. Early French fur traders named the lake Coeur d'Alene because they believed the local Indians were clever traders whose hearts were as sharp as a bradawl, a tool with a beveled tip used to make holes in wood for brads or screws.It wasn't until Fort Sherman was established in 1878 that Coeur d'Alene began to grow and flourish, building its fortunes on logging, mining, fur trading and lake steamers. The town later became an important link on the transportation network linking the mining operations in the east, in Silver Valley, with the smelters that processed the mined ore. A major timber boom caused the population to increase dramatically in the early 1900s, and the small frontier town expanded into a political, business and recreational center. The expansion brought with it recognition, festivals, fairs and, later, unique restaurants and shopping malls.The crime rate also grew, but was comparatively low when viewed alongside the rest of the nation. In 2003, the FBI recorded only 203 violent crimes, and only one of those was a homicide. The violent crime rate was 5.5 per 1,000 people; the area has an estimated population of 37,262.Parents were not afraid to leave their children alone while they went into town to run errands. Children played outside without parental supervision, rode their bicycles wherever they wanted, and built forts in the nearby woods--kids there simply did all of the things that kids would normally do where they felt safe.Two years later, the story of Joseph Edward DuncanIII would change the way people thought about Coeur d'Alene. 
 
DUNCAN ARRIVED IN KOOTENAI COUNTY SOMETIME DURING the second week of May 2005. It is not known precisely why he stopped in the Wolf Lodge Bay area, a quiet escape for nature lovers, lightly populated and located about 8 miles east of Coeur d'Alene, just off Interstate 90. Perhaps he had merely wanted to grab a bite to eat, or to rest for a while. At some point, however, he allegedly ended up on Frontage Road and drove past a small white house with green trim, the lower portion of which appeared to have been coated with stucco on one side. This was where the Groene and McKenzie family lived.Witnesses later told the police that the Groene-McKenzie home was sometimes visited by strangers whose vehicles had broken down on the freeway--their house was the first home anyone looking for help would see after getting off Interstate 90 and onto Frontage Road. People said that the family was always happy to help a stranger in need.The house, somewhat secluded and surrounded by trees, brush and low-lying hills, was approximately 150 yards down a dirt driveway from Frontage Road and made an easy target for someone bent on wrongdoing. Many have speculated that Duncan likely saw his next victims, Shasta Groene, 8, and her brother, Dylan, 9, playing outside the house in the unseasonably warm May weather, frolicking in the yard, or walking or riding their bikes along Frontage Road, perhaps waving at a passing motorist, or motioning to passing truckers to honk the air horns on their semis. Shasta had been wearing her bathing suit on at least one of the days that weekend, andit has been suggested that it was the sight of two young children playing in their swimming suits that brought Duncan's depraved sexual madness to the surface.It is believed that he reconnoitered the area for at least a day or two until he found the perfect vantage point where he could watch the kids and their family from a distance without being easily seen, using a night-vision apparatus during the evening hours. While the exact timeframe isn't known, police believed that Duncan may have stalked the family for a few days after becoming comfortable with his surroundings. Perhaps he even followed them to town when they shopped or ran errands.Throughout the weekend of May 13-15, Shasta and Dylan's mother, Brenda Kay Groene (pronounced "grow-knee"), 40, came and went, as did Brenda's resident boyfriend, Mark McKenzie, 37, and Shasta and Dylan's older brother, Slade, 13. On Sunday, May 15, 2005, the family drove into Coeur d'Alene to run errands, and then returned home, where they enjoyed a barbecue with some friends. The gathering went into the early evening hours before it broke up. Their friends went home, and the residents prepared to go to bed. It was the last time that anyone would remember seeing Brenda and Slade Groene and Mark McKenzie alive.The crime that Duncan was allegedly about to commit was out of character for him. His prior victims had been children, victims who were unable to defend themselves against an adult who, though standing 6-feet, 2-inches, weighed a mere 150 pounds. Tall and lanky, he should have been an easy match for another adult, particularly one trying to defend himself.But he had come prepared.Copyright © 2007 by Gary C. King.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 23 )
Rating Distribution

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(9)

4 Star

(5)

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2 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 24 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2012

    scary for parents

    Very good read
    Only complaint is there were no pics like it said there were

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 17, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Should've Expected as Much

    While the color photos and captivating headlines always turn my head at the bookstore, I usually know better than to pick up a true crime book. I went against my better judgment when I decided to read Stolen in the Night: The True Story of a Family's Murder, a Kidnapping and the Child Who Survived by Gary C. King and I really wish I wouldn't have.

    Stolen in the Night is the story about Joseph Edward Duncan, a sexual psychopath, and how he kidnapped two children in Idaho and brutally murdered the rest of their family. The story itself is as shocking and disturbing as it's advertised to be. However, the presentation of that story could be much better.

    This is where I blame true crime novels in general. They typically read like a long, drawn-out newscast. Sure, there are plenty of details, but not necessarily the details readers are craving to learn. For example, it doesn't really matter to me what the chief investigator of a case had for breakfast. In a fictionalized story, this minute detail might help develop the character and could be seen as a necessary contribution, but in a book like this, it's merely thrown in amongst other facts to take up space. On top of that, there is usually no flair to the writing. The words are informative, yet stale, and the reader ends up feeling like he's just finished a news article or blurb from a textbook. I have to say that in this area, Gary C. King excelled. His writing was not as poor as some of the other true crime authors I have read. He did his best to use vivid vocabulary here and there, which made it possible for me to finish the book instead of throwing it away after the first one hundred pages.

    My recommendations about this book vary based on your purpose. If you simply want to learn what happened with this psychopath and the kids he kidnapped, but don't want to wade through a bunch of irrelevant information, I would simply find a news article about the crime. It'll be easier to read, give you all the information you want, and take up a whole lot less of your time! If you enjoy knowing every intricate detail of every conversation, theory, and investigation, then you might enjoy this book. Like I said previously, its biggest fault is that it's written for the true crime genre. Gary C. King has talent, but as a reader, I think it could be put to much better use than writing glorified news reports.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 14, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A Family Destroyed, A Little Girl's Courage

    This true crime story heartbreakingly conveys the story of the anniliation of a family. Sexual psychopath Joseph Edward Duncan II brutally murdered a mother, her older son, and her boyfriend. Duncan then kidnaps the murdered woman's other 2 children, young Shasta and Dylan Groene from their idyllic Idaho home.

    Millions of people watched the horror of this case unfold on the evening news. Detectives and the FBI scrambled to find the missing children, and the nation held it's collective breath, hoping for the best, anticipating the worst.

    Told with an unerring eye to detail, Gary King's book takes the reader on this heartrending story, from harrowing twists to the tale of a courageous little girl who manages to survive against all odds. You feel the righteous indignation that comes with knowing that a bragging sexual predator was allowed to escape his punishment for earlier crimes, the horror faced by the young girl who he sexually brutalized, and the brother she knows he murdered. This story will haunt you long after you finish reading it, as much from the experiences of the family as from knowing that the system didn't work, and that this monster was allowed to go free.

    Mr. King writes with great detail, and shares much of the case, the work involved, and the background story that allowed this horror to exist in the first place. I came away knowing more about the faults of our justice system, and what made this psychopath "tick". Knowing that Shasta has been reunited with her father, and is receiving psychological help to deal with her ordeal, brings the book to a decent conclusion. There is no happy ending to this story, and Mr. King doesn't try to paint a picture of one. It's handled with tact, well-meaning and compassion.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2013

    Disappointing

    The book offered nothing new. I was hoping to learn more about the victims; however, they did not get mentioned much. Save your money. If you've seen the news, you've already seen it all.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2012

    This book is not true at all

    Too bad this book isnt the truth!!! This is my family that is in this book!! Maybe one day someone will get the real story!!!!


    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2012

    Sad but true

    Great book,heard about it and wanted to read it sad but one you will enjoy.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 16, 2011

    Stolen in the night

    This book drug on. I couldnt wait to get it over

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 9, 2010

    Highly recommended if you have a tough stomach

    this book is a heart felt book. It have its ups and downs. its not recommended for children under the age of 13 because its to graphic for them. if you have a book report or project about child abuse, you should use this book for your project...

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 9, 2009

    Enlightening Conversation Book

    I thought this book was good, but it did take me a while to really get into it. It is definitely a book that will make you think about our justice system and how some offenders slip through the cracks so easily and can manipulate trained staff. This would make a great conversation between those with the same interest in law, or sometimes the lack of it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2007

    A Quick Read

    This book was a quick read, but very good. The author seemed very thorough, and appeared sensitive toward the victims and their families. The only other book I've read by this writer is An Early Grave.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2013

    Sad book

    Somthing i dont nor will never understand, why these child molesters/rapist/killers are let out of prison ?? Didnt anyone ever hear of do somthing once will do again ?? I get so angry here is a damn monster that has raped, molested, killed, and was out in our society to keep doing these horrible acts on innocent children !! If jails/prisons are overloaded start getting rid of these monsters, my gosh dont let them out !! Please !! .... Bn

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2013

    Makes me sick

    To think about what happened to this poor family. Hug your kids twice tonight!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2012

    Sad

    If you ever worie about yur children read this book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2011

    Didn't provide any additional insight

    This book was ok for a quick read. It didn't provide any additional insight into the case at all. It seems as though the author was rushing when he wrote the book and it reads like a bunch of compiled news articles. There are a lot of areas were the same information is repeated multiple times and it seems to focus more on what changes need to be made to the current laws concerning sex offenders than it does with the case it's supposed to be about.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2011

    Tragedy

    Hate it and love it

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 30, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    This book sets forth Awareness in all of us

    This was a good book, because it makes us more aware of what is going on around us. Any parent should read this book. We need to be aware of the people around us, and the things that go in in our communities, as well as communities close by. This book gives you a glimpse into a mirderers mind- its sick.

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  • Posted August 1, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Stolen in the Night/ Cries in the deseret

    I read both of these books, I love them both I was shocked at how a man can do all those things and manage to get away with it. If the police and the probration office did there job he would not have been able to get out of jail to murder,kidnap and rape these these two children and there family. I was very happy to hear that the little girl was found alive. She had to watch her whole family get murdered and her little brother be raped and killed and be raped herself. How does any little girl live with that. I am talking about the book stolen in the night. I would recomend this book to read it is very sad it may bring you to tears but read it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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