Stone Soup

( 4 )

Overview

A clever young man tricks an old woman into believing that soup can be made from a stone. As the pot of water boils with the stone in it, he urges her to add more and more ingredients until the soup is a feast "fit for a king." In print for 30 years.

When the little old lady claims she has no food to give him, a hungry young man proceeds to make a soup with a stone and water.

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Overview

A clever young man tricks an old woman into believing that soup can be made from a stone. As the pot of water boils with the stone in it, he urges her to add more and more ingredients until the soup is a feast "fit for a king." In print for 30 years.

When the little old lady claims she has no food to give him, a hungry young man proceeds to make a soup with a stone and water.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The familiar folktale was first retold by McGovern in 1968. Now Pels has provided new pictures for this simple story about a young wayfarer who tricks an old woman into making him a hearty soup. When she refuses him food, he asks her for a pot of water. Then he puts a stone into it and waits for it to become stone soup. ``It's cooking fast now,'' says the hungry young man, ``but it would cook faster with some onions.'' Soon the old woman has added vegetables, meat bones, barley and butter, musing at the miracle of stone soup. She resembles Tenniel's Red Queen, and has pins and needles sticking in her back; the young man's arms and legs are jarringly angular. Perhaps Pels's idiosyncratic style is too somber for this funny story, making it unnecessarily dark. (3-7)
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
In this version of the favorite tale a young man convinces an old woman that soup can be made from a stone. As the pot boils with the stone in it, he urges her to add more and more ingredients. When the soup is done they sit down and dine on a feast that is fit for a king. The drawing have a flavor of years gone by with their muted tones, funny looking old woman and a beggar boy who is much to clean looking.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2 An ``easy-to-read retelling'' of a traditional folktale. While it is considerably shorter than Marcia Brown's Stone Soup (Scribners, 1947) and is written in short, declarative sentences, it is also a lackluster retelling that is repetitious and downright tedious to read. It's a bit like being served a big bowl of stone soup without the benefit of meat, vegetables, or any spice. There are only two characters: a young man who is hungry and an old woman who learns about Stone Soup. The elaborate, detailed pastel drawings are evocative, but the perspective is sometimes askew. The old woman looms tall in some drawings while appearing frail and petite in others. The facial expressions often border on the grotesque. Stick to the orignal. Luann Toth, Summit Free Public Library, N.J.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780590416023
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 9/28/1986
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 81,009
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: 480L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 7.37 (w) x 7.42 (h) x 0.10 (d)

Meet the Author


Ann McGovern has been writing children's books for over 35 years. She has published over 45 titles including STONE SOUP, several books in the IF YOU LIVED.... series, and SCRAM, KID! (Viking, 1974), which won the Horn Book Award. McGovern spent part of her career at Scholastic, where she created the See-Saw Book Club. McGovern lives in New York City.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 21, 2012

    An old folk tale

    This is another retelling of a classic, the story of a wandering man who promises to make a delicious soup for an old lady - from a stone! She provides a pot of water and a fire, he places the stone in the pot and begins to muse about the various things that would make the soup especially tasty - vegetables, salt, a beef bone - and the old lady provides each in turn. Voila! A delicious soup is created - and all from a stone!

    The story is fun and well illustrated in this edition. As a child develops reasoning skills, he or she will be able to realize that the man plays a trick in order to obtain food.

    In this edition, it is only one old lady who interacts with the trickster; in other editions a whole village is involved, with each person bringing a different ingredient. The lesson seems a bit different in community.

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  • Posted December 5, 2009

    stone soup

    i love this storie, i think all children should read it, it has so much meaning that people today need to hear. i heard this the first time in 4th grade, i have read it to my children and will read it to my grandchildre and godchildren, any child i read to.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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