Stone Soup

Stone Soup

5.0 3
by Heather Forest, Susan Gaber
     
 

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Two hungry travelers arrive at a village expecting to find a household that will share a bit of food, as has been the custom along their journey. To their surprise, villager after villager refuses to share, each one closing the door with a bang. As they sit to rest beside a well, one of the travelers observes that if the townspeople have no food to share, they must

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Overview

Two hungry travelers arrive at a village expecting to find a household that will share a bit of food, as has been the custom along their journey. To their surprise, villager after villager refuses to share, each one closing the door with a bang. As they sit to rest beside a well, one of the travelers observes that if the townspeople have no food to share, they must be in greater need than we are.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Forest and Gaber (previously paired for The Woman Who Flummoxed the Fairies; The Baker's Dozen) revisit this oft-told tale to demonstrate the pleasures of collaboration and mutual generosity. Two hungry travelers, denied food by the inhabitants of a mountain village, publicly declare that they can make soup from a stone. Only they need a carrot... and a potato... and a few more ingredients to make it taste really good. Everyone in the town contributes something, pronounces the soup delicious and learns the magic behind it: sharing. Gaber's bold acrylic paintings emphasize the big black soup tureen and the brightly colored vegetable ingredients. As each member of the multiracial town speaks up to offer a contribution, a speech bubble appears showing a picture of the offering. Forest's jolly prose simmers with energy: "Bring what you've got! Put it in the pot!" cry the travelers. Flavorful and nutritious, this classic tale is served up with a smile. A recipe for stone soup tops it off. Ages 4-8. (May) FYI: The other two folktales in the series are The Dancing Turtle: A Folktale from Brazil, retold by Pleasant DeSpain, illus. by David Boston; and a bilingual title, The Girl Who Wore Too Much: A Folktale from Thailand, retold by Margaret Read MacDonald, trans. by Supaporn Vathanaprida, illus. by Yvonne Lebrun Davis (each $15.95 ISBN -502-X; -503-8; May)
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1As they did in The Baker's Dozen (1993) and The Woman Who Flummoxed the Fairies (1990, both Harcourt), this storyteller and illustrator have once again collaborated in the retelling of a traditional tale. Unlike Marcia Brown's classic version in which three hungry French soldiers are returning from a war (Scribners, 1947), this Stone Soup is not linked to any particular time or place. The straightforward, didactic retelling concludes with the lesson (for those readers who somehow missed it): "`These two travelers made such a delicious soup out of a stone.' `Out of a stone,' said the travelers with a grin, `and a magical ingredient...sharing.'" Gaber's brilliantly colored paintings illuminate a mountain village with a multicultural population. Whereas Brown's version offers readers a tasty mix of suspicious peasants and clever soldiers, Forest's tale has a medicinal aftertaste.Kathleen Whalin, Greenwich Country Day School, CT

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780874836028
Publisher:
August House Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
12/28/2005
Edition description:
1 PBK ED
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
163,713
Product dimensions:
8.66(w) x 11.13(h) x 0.10(d)
Lexile:
AD310L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

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Stone Soup 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Jill90 More than 1 year ago
This book is a great example of sharing! In the back there is a recipe to make your own Stone Soup! Also, I am an elementary education major and used this for storytelling via felt board. Pieces were easy to make and the story was loved by all children! Fantastic book!!
Sally_Bull More than 1 year ago
This version of Stone Soup can relate to anyone. Unlike the previous version of Stone Soup by Marcia Brown, this tale does not mention soldiers or a war, therefore allowing it to pertain to anyone at anytime. It is a tale about two hungry travelers who come to a town and ask everyone if they have any food they can spare. Everyone replies with a solid, "no". However, the clever travelers come up with a 'magic' trick. They tell the whole town that they can make a magic soup out of stones, but they will need help from the townspeople. In the end, the travelers trick the into bringing delicious ingredients, and they end up with an enormous pot of delicious soup, that the whole town can share.
I think this a great book for kindergarten children through fourth grade to listen to or read. It shows what good can come from sharing and working together. I also recently used this book in a second grade social studies class as an example of common good, and the students loved it!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Two travelors come to a village to work their magic. In the beginning, noone will share. In the end, the happy villagers are waving goodbye to the travelors. Where are they off to? To another village to work some more magic !!! Couple this book with the song written and performed by the author.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book to my first grade class as an introduction to a nutrition unit. Not only was it an excellent introduction but a rewarding lesson in sharing as well.