Stoo Hample's Book of Bad Manners
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Stoo Hample's Book of Bad Manners

by Stoo Hample, Stuart E. Hample
     
 

From the sultan of silly comes a comical, kid-friendly guide to avoiding naughty behavior.

The Toy Hog. The Blabbermouth. The Food Face, the Belcher, and (shudder) the Nose Picker. They're all here, and more - a veritable rogues' gallery of the rudest, crudest, meanest manners found wherever children slurp, grab, desert the table, or cut in line. With his

Overview

From the sultan of silly comes a comical, kid-friendly guide to avoiding naughty behavior.

The Toy Hog. The Blabbermouth. The Food Face, the Belcher, and (shudder) the Nose Picker. They're all here, and more - a veritable rogues' gallery of the rudest, crudest, meanest manners found wherever children slurp, grab, desert the table, or cut in line. With his trademark retro artwork and hilarious running commentary, Stoo Hample teaches children good manners by example - of what not to do - and bolsters his case with a final broad hint that the reader who fails to take heed may soon be the star of a book just like this one.

Editorial Reviews

Entertainment Weekly
"The kids in my book are rude, loud, and mean - the worst mannered kids that you've ever seen!'' proclaims the book's cover. And it doesn't disappoint. In hilarious, disgusting rhyming prose, accompanied by equally hilarious, disgusting drawings, are descriptions of every kind of abysmally behaved kid: the name caller, the greedy guy, the toy hog, the nose picker (''Watch out for this sort/And try not to meet them/Especially the pickers/Who pick them, then eat them!'') and on and on. Kids will laugh, but the idea of what's socially acceptable - and what's not - is the message here, conveyed in language that they'll all understand. A- -TJ Recommended ages: 4-9
Children's Literature - Dianne Ochiltree
Author and illustrator Stoo Hample is best known for his classic children's title, The Silly Book, which was first published in 1961 (reissued in 2004) and which established Mr. Hample as one of the silliest grownups on the planet. He's also a fabulous cartoonist, and a darn good poet—as his latest book demonstrates. The text is entertaining, and educational in its own way, as it presents the members of the "Bad Manners Hall of Shame." Each one of the culprits has a poem dedicated to his or her poor behavior and given a funny alias: the Nose Picker, Blabbermouth, Sloppy Sneezer, Food-Face, Belcher, Line Cutter, Toy Hog, Pig Boy, to name a few of the offenders. Each also has his or her own smile-inducing, outrageous illustration so we can understand the true nature of their odious manners—and enjoy a laugh at the same time. The illustrations employ spot colorization over the expressive black and white cartoon renderings to achieve a charming 'retro' look. Manners, good and bad, have been a perennial favorite in children's literature. This one takes on the topic with a lot of humor and makes its points with good-natured, gross-out fun. Parents and kids alike will enjoy reading this one over and over again. And hopefully, everyone will take the lessons to heart, because if, as Hample says on the final page, "...you're just as awful, not nice or polite, you'll be in the next Book of Bad Manners I write."
School Library Journal
Gr 3-5-Accompanying each category of rude child ("They're enormously foul,/Crude, rude, loud, and mean-/The worst-mannered kids/That you've ever seen!") are exuberant line drawings of the malefactor at work and a small self-portrait of the artist offering a running commentary. The title of each poem, "Lousy Listener," "Belcher," etc., is hand-lettered in an appropriate wanted-poster style. The child appeal in this assortment of ill-mannered kids is undeniable: "This angel-faced girl/Thinks it's funny and smart/To smile and secretly/Fluff out a fart." Hample's brats belong on the shelves with William E. Cole's Beastly Boys and Ghastly Girls (Random, 1977), and Jovial Bob Stine's Don't Stand in the Soup (Bantam, 1982). Miss Manners may not be amused, but most young readers will be.-Kathleen Whalin, York Public Library, ME Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
From the opening lineup of seemingly angelic nogoodniks to the closing view of a lad mooning viewers, this diatribe against the unmannerly couldn't be verse. Plainly modeled on Gelett Burgess's Goops, simply-drawn cartoon children hog toys, slouch, ignore parental requests to clean up their rooms, talk during movies and such sins-along with burping, farting with a smile and eating boogers-to the tune of rhymes that range from labored to lame. "Food-Face" talks with her mouth full, so, "Whoever's beside her / Is very unlucky, / 'Cause being so close / Is gross-and quite yucky!" Closing with a less-than-effective threat-"If you're equally awful, / Not nice or polite, / You'll be in the next / Book like this that I write"-these bad examples are far less likely to result in any sort of behavior modification than Jane Yolen's How Do Dinosaurs Eat Their Food? (2005) or any of the plethora of other, more imaginative approaches to the topic. (Picture book/nonfiction. 6-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763629335
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
08/08/2006
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
7.33(w) x 10.48(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
3 Months to 18 Years

Meet the Author

Stoo Hample is the author-illustrator of THE SILLY BOOK, first published to great acclaim in 1961 and reissued by Candlewick Press in 2004, to still more acclaim. I WILL KISS YOU (LOTS & LOTS & LOTS!) followed in 2006. He lives in New York City.

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