The Stories of Vladimir Nabokov

The Stories of Vladimir Nabokov

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by Vladimir Nabokov
     
 

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From the writer who shocked and delighted the world with his novels Lolita, Pale Fire,
and Ada, or Ardor, and so many others, comes a magnificent collection of stories. Written between the 1920s and 1950s, these sixty-five tales—eleven of which have been translated into English for the first time—display all the shades of Nabokov's

Overview

From the writer who shocked and delighted the world with his novels Lolita, Pale Fire,
and Ada, or Ardor, and so many others, comes a magnificent collection of stories. Written between the 1920s and 1950s, these sixty-five tales—eleven of which have been translated into English for the first time—display all the shades of Nabokov's imagination. They range from sprightly fables to bittersweet tales of loss, from claustrophobic exercises in horror to a connoisseur's samplings of the table of human folly. Read as a whole, The Stories of Vladimir Nabokov offers and intoxicating draft of the master's genius, his devious wit, and his ability to turn language into an instrument of ecstasy.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Eleven of the 65 short stories by the exiled Russian master see their English-language debut here. (Jan.)
Library Journal
Presented here are 65 stories from the master, the author of one of the best and strangest novels in the history of fiction-Pale Fire-as well as Lolita, Ada, Pnin, et al. Thirteen of these stories appear here for the first time in book form, although these early pieces are of less interest than the later ones, which contain all the linguistic and psychological twists for which Nabokov is famous. The earliest stories date from the 1920s and the latest from the 1950s, when Nabokov abandoned the form. Because of the editorial care taken by Nabokov's son Dmitri, this should appeal even to libraries fortunate enough still to own the earlier collections (Nabokov's Dozen, 1984; A Russian Beauty & Other Stories, 1973; Tyrants Destroyed & Other Stories, 1975; and Details of a Sunset & Other Stories, 1976). One could hope that a new movie version of Lolita currently in production will rekindle interest in Nabokov. An essential purchase.-Robert E. Brown, Onondaga Cty. P.L., Syracuse, N.Y.
Michiko Kakutani
In this sumptuous volume of 65 stories...the reader is treated to a recapitulation of the sorcerer's entire career. His fascination with the illusive transactions made between life and art, his obsession with memory and the practice of nostalgia, his own experience of expatriation, and his love of games of puzzles and coincidence -- all can be found in these pages. -- The New York Times
John Updike
"What startling beauty phrase, twist of thought, depth of sorrow and burst of wit!...It was Navakov's gift to bring Paradise wherever he alighted." -- The New York Times Book Review
Michiko Kakutani
"In this sumptious volume of 65 stories...the reader is treated to a recapitulation of the Sorcerer's entire career. His fascination with illusive transactions made between life and art, his obsession with memory and the practice of nostalgia, his own experience of expatriation, and his love of games and puzzels and coincidence -- all can be found in these pages." -- The New York Times
Anthony Lane
"A startling, close view of a writer's development..There is an unequal pleasure (in) submitting to Navakov in full flow, when his words boil like a witches brew of music and sex...This collection marks a crucial move in the endless game of trying to fathom Navakov." -- The New Yorker
R.Z. Sheppard
"An authentic literary event...a welcome addition to the shelves of old and mirue. An chance for intrigue - level fans to sample the author's real life...(with) some of the most nape-tingling prose and devilish inventions in it twentieth-century letters." -- Time

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780679729976
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
01/20/1997
Series:
Vintage International Series
Pages:
704
Sales rank:
266,169
Product dimensions:
5.15(w) x 7.99(h) x 1.52(d)

Meet the Author

One of the twentieth century’s master prose stylists, Vladimir Nabokov was born in St. Petersburg in 1899. He studied French and Russian literature at Trinity College, Cambridge, then lived in Berlin and Paris, where he launched a brilliant literary career. In 1940 he moved to the United States, and achieved renown as a novelist, poet, critic and translator. He taught literature at Wellesley, Stanford, Cornell, and Harvard. In 1961 he moved to Montreux, Switzerland, where he died in 1977.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
April 23, 1899
Date of Death:
July 2, 1977
Place of Birth:
St. Petersburg, Russia
Place of Death:
Montreux, Switzerland
Education:
Trinity College, Cambridge, 1922

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The Stories of Vladimir Nabokov 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
OperaNrocks More than 1 year ago
Our memories are the important things, people and places our minds and hearts have selected to sustain us and others. There are so many things Mr. Nabokov has remembered for and about us in these pages it's unsettling to pick only one or two in a blurb - online, no less. He knows how to look at events or items and see how we will appreciate them one day. A Guide to Berlin is an early story that shows how some of the most mundane things may look to us in a future museum of, say, a streetcar in a museum of transportation (as I said, mundane today but perhaps wistful after the disappearance of its ilk). For him literary creation is "to find in the objects around us the fragrant tenderness that only posterity will discern and appreciate in the far-off times when every trifle of our plain everday life will become exquisite and festive in its own right". I like that phrase "fragrant tenderness". And he writes about so much more than just streetcars. By the way, if you like complexity for more than its own sake try Lolita. Humbert, the narrator, lovingly recalls his overwhelming and mostly unrepentant memories (see the last page for the only one) of the misery and ruin he gave to that young girl who only struggled to survive a little while beyond his clenching grasp. It's as if Poe had risen to the level of Shakespeare or Pushkin and created a picture of a man damning himself in his revels.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book began my love affair with the written word. Nabokov's short prose soars with a singularly intense beauty. An excellent introduction to his writing for those not familiar and a must have for fans because it contains all of his previously published stories plus some newly translated ones.