Storm Thief

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Overview


A darkly thrilling new novel from master storyteller Chris Wooding, about a civilization plagued by chaos and reality-rearranging storms.

Orokos is a city of chaos, lashed by probability storms that re-order the world wherever they strike. It covers every inch of the rocky island that it dominates. It has stood for so long that history has forgotten it, and its citizens no longer question what exists beyond its walls. Then three of its denizens discover a map that holds the key...

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Overview


A darkly thrilling new novel from master storyteller Chris Wooding, about a civilization plagued by chaos and reality-rearranging storms.

Orokos is a city of chaos, lashed by probability storms that re-order the world wherever they strike. It covers every inch of the rocky island that it dominates. It has stood for so long that history has forgotten it, and its citizens no longer question what exists beyond its walls. Then three of its denizens discover a map that holds the key to the secret at the heart of Orokos. But there are others, such as the Chief of the Protectorate Secret Police, who would do anything to get their hands on that power...anything at all...

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Judy Silverman
This book starts with a goal and a captivating scene. A migrating bird has lost its flock and its sense of direction. Buffeted by storm winds, it struggles desperately to find some place to land. The scene is so skillfully drawn that we find ourselves breathing heavily, hoping the bird will survive. In the next scene, a being whose identity we do not know picks up the dead bird, examines it, and tries to wake it. We are told that this creature is a golem, but the term is not defined. Now the plot begins. Orokos is a city in chaos. Its population consists of groups that know nothing about each other, a situation that proves very useful to the tyrannical government. Its ancient buildings are so big that no one knows what is actually in them. Supernatural beings threaten every living creature. Then there are the probability storms. These are not only violent, they cause things to change. The street that was North-South is now East-West. A door that led to a bathroom now leads to the stairs. Moa, a girl who was left-handed, is now right-handed. Her friend Rail is a young man whose lungs have been destroyed in a probability storm, and he must now breathe through a respirator. These two are the protagonists of the story. They work as part of a gang of thieves, but Moa, who knows that thievery is wrong, is sure that Orokos is not the only place to live. However, the city will not let them leave—it will not let anyone leave. Gradually we meet other characters—a member of the secret police, a slightly mad scientist and his granddaughter—and we are told about others who may or may not actually exist. Confusing? Yes, but a good read. It is probably not for readers unfamiliar withthe genre.
VOYA - David Goodale
In this well-crafted effort, teens Rail and Moa are thieves in the chaotic city of Orokos. Terrible probability storms batter the city, changing everything in their path-streets, buildings, even people-without warning. When the two thieves steal a powerful artifact powered by the science of the past, they suddenly find themselves hunted by fellow thieves and the city's Secret Police. As Rail and Moa struggle to evade pursuit, they meet the strange "golem" (cyborg) known as Vago, who is feared and shunned by the people of the city. Vago must contend with his mysterious past, and as the chase intensifies, Rail and Moa come to realize that the artifact may be capable of unlocking the secrets of Orokos itself. Wooding delivers memorable characters, such as Vago, whose plight--Who am I and where do I belong in the world?--will be understood by many teens. Wooding also creates a unique world for his characters to explore, and the setting serves as an excellent backdrop for the author to develop his theme of order versus chaos and the need for balance between the two. The story's main plot is well thought out and meshes nicely with the subplots that develop. The ending, reminiscent of Lois Lowry's The Giver (Houghton Mifflin, 1993/VOYA August 1993), will leave teens with points to ponder. This book is recommended for all libraries where science fiction is popular and particularly where Wooding's horror/fantasy has been popular in the past.
KLIATT
Young thieves Rail and Moa are in serious trouble when they steal a mysterious artifact created by a more advanced past civilization, a device that has the ability to open any door. They go on the run, accompanied by a strange golem, a hybrid of flesh and metal. The three are pursued by a minion of Rail and Moa's thief-mistress, who wants the artifact, and also by the secret police, who are trying to recover both the golem and the artifact for their own nefarious purposes. The setting is the isolated island city of Orokos, which is subject to probability storms in which anything can happen--entire districts can suddenly vanish, or just the color of Moa's eye shadow can change--and energy ghosts that kill on contact roam the streets. Can the three make it across the dangerous city to a hidden community that has been secretly building boats to escape the island, or is a dramatic fate in store for all the residents of Orokos, provoked by the potentially destructive power of the door-opening artifact? This edge-of-your-seat thriller, by the author of Poison and The Haunting of Alaizabel Cray, is a great read, with loads of action and lots of imaginative details: it would make a terrific movie. A sure bet for all SF, fantasy and adventure fans. KLIATT Codes: JS*--Exceptional book, recommended for junior and senior high school students. 2006, Scholastic, 320p., $16.99.. Ages 12 to 18.
—Paula Rohrlick
School Library Journal
Gr 6 Up-This imaginative and descriptive work of fantasy and fear opens with a seabird crashing into a window, dying, and being picked up by a golem named Vago. Rail and Moa are ghetto teens. Rail has taken the girl under his wing and taught her to be a thief, although stealing pains her sense of morality. They live in a land ruled by a totalitarian government led by the Protectorate's Patrician. The Protectorate is meant to protect the citizens of Orokos from Revenants, ghosts that take over people's bodies and kill everything they can. Lysander Bane has a ruthlessly unquestioning dedication to order and law. But order is elusive in Orokos, where at any time a probability storm can occur. Children can turn to stone, people turn into cats, left-handers become right-handed. Rail can no longer breathe by himself but needs a respirator. The plot is complicated and there are many characters and types of creatures to keep track of, but Wooding does a masterful job of tying everything together. Ultimately, the golem interacts with Rail and Moa, who unlock the secrets of the probability storms and the Protectorate. All ends on a hopeful if uncertain note. Characterization is deft, and teens will relate to both Moa and Rail. The concept of the probability storms is fascinating and lends a constant sense of danger and menace. The golem is unlike any in literature; the description of what happens to him in the end is heartbreaking yet encouraging.-B. Allison Gray, John Jermain Library, Sag Harbor, NY Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Come visit Orokos, an ancient metropolis in serious decay from previous technological heights. The city, controlled by tempests that create chaos in all its sectors and populations, also endures a dictator who maintains a shaky hold between probability storms. Once again, Wooding takes fantasy and science-fiction conventions and gives them a good twist. Descriptions of this closed world as witnessed by teen thieves, Rail and Moa, by a golem escaped during a probability storm and by the head of the secret police himself, make very real the nature of Orokos's dystopia. The two teens, having committed an unforgivable offense against their thief mistress, join with the golem Vago in a quest for freedom from the fetid prison their world has become. Changing points of view, cliffhanger section endings, hair-raising escapes and a bitter betrayal lead to a slam-bang climax and a satisfying, lyrical and surprisingly touching ending. Although strikingly different from The Haunting of Alaizabel Cray (2004) and Poison (2005), this stunning work of speculative fiction will appeal to Wooding's fans and earn him new ones. (Fiction. YA)
From the Publisher

Kirkus Starred
Come visit Orokos, an ancient metropolis in serious decay from previous technological heights.
The city, controlled by tempests that create chaos in all its sectors and populations, also endures a dictator who maintains a shaky hold between probability storms. Once again, Wooding takes fantasy and science-fiction conventions and gives them a good twist. Descriptions of this closed world as witnessed by teen thieves, Rail and Moa, by a golem escaped during a probability storm and by the head of the secret police himself, make very real the nature of Orokos's dystopia. The two teens,
having committed an unforgivable offense against their thief mistress, join with the golem Vago in a quest for freedom from the fetid prison their world has become. Changing points of view, cliffhanger section endings, hair-raising escapes and a bitter betrayal lead to a slam-bang climax and a satisfying,
lyrical and surprisingly touching ending. Although strikingly different from The Haunting of Alaizabel
Cray (2004) and Poison (2005), this stunning work of speculative fiction will appeal to Wooding's fans and earn him new ones. (Fiction. YA)

HB
Wooding, author of the strange and adventure-filled Poison (rev. 9/05), once more opens his fantastical cabinet of invention, this time for a foray to the island-bound city Orokos, where probability storms change the topography or the inhabitants in the blink of an eye. Buildings vanish to reappear elsewhere, and people may turn to glass or grow extra limbs. Rail and Moa, two ghetto brats with only each other to depend on, steal an artifact of ancient science that enables them to pass through walls, but their thief-master wants the artifact for herself. The two flee to Moa's former home, a secret enclave of visionaries determined to escape the island, but they must first pass through a sector overrun by Revenants, wraiths that kill with a touch and then occupy the body. A stray whom Moa collects along the way, a hideous half-mechanical winged golem, helps combat the Revenants but attracts pursuit from the ruthless secret police. Wooding doles out plot revelations with a generous hand, salting the whole with liberal amounts of mortal peril, but while the wonders and tension keep the pot bubbling merrily, it is the triangle between Rail, Moa, and the initially innocent golem that gives the book its deeper savor. A page-turner to the end, Storm Thief will leave readers longing for more from Wooding's magical imagination. ANITA L. BURKAM

Booklist
Gr. 6–9. The latest from the author of The Haunting of Alaizabel Cray (2004) and Poison (2005) is a post-apocalyptic fantasy with trappings reminiscent of the 1995 film Waterworld. The citizens of Orokos, a crumbling city surrounded by an endless ocean, live at the mercy of probability storms that “might steal a baby's eyes and replace them with buttons, or turn a house into sugar paper.” Together with the chaotic conditions, the city's totalitarian government makes life miserable for marginalized “ghetto-folk” like teen thieves Moa and Rail. After the companions stumble upon a valuable artifact, they must flee pursuers who covet their find. Their journey brings them into contact with a half-mechanical homunculus and a group of rebels preparing to escape the city permanently. A familiarity with Frankenstein and Rime of the Ancient Mariner, clear sources of inspiration, will enrich readers' appreciation of the novel, although most will simply like the inventive premise and the protagonists' tender relationship, never overtly romantic but replete with unspoken yearnings. –Jennifer Mattson

VOYA- I this well-crafted effort, teens Rail and Moa are thieves in the chaotic city of Orokos. Terrible probability storms batter the city, changing everything in their path- streets, buildings, even people- wi

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780439865142
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 10/1/2007
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 320
  • Age range: 12 years
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author


Chris Wooding began writing at the age of 16, and his first novel Crashing was published when he was 19. Since that time, he's written dozens of novels in several genres, notably the award-winning The Haunting of Alaizabel Cray; Poison; Storm Thief; the Malice series; and the graphic novel, Pandemonium.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 53 )
Rating Distribution

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(33)

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(15)

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2 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 53 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    A really good read.

    I read this book about six months ago and fell in love with it. I am most definitely going to buy it in the near future(along with Poison and The Haunting of Alaizabel Cray, also by the same author). It was really that good! I could hardly put it down until I was finished. It just kept me wondering what was going to happen next.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    All time favorite! Can be read over and over again

    I love this book it is one off my many favorites, i love the fact that it is written in parts instead of chapters it really keeps you guessing and the characters a so colorful, the plot is interesting, really love Chris Wooding's style of writing.I love this book!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    LovesThisBook

    I dont know why it's saying it's not publishes yet, I read this sae book last year. Anyway this book is awesome, it makes you think about whats going to happen next. It's definitely better than the description they give it here. It is one of my favorite books.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 20, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Exciting and thrilling.... A must read

    Storm thief will keep you on the edge of your seat through out the whole book. The main characters, Rail and Moa, are thiefs in the city of Orokos. They steal any thing from jewerly to food. But once they come across an ancient artifact that creates magical door ways their whole life changes. They go on an amazing adventure through the city, dodging probability storms, revenants, and the protectorate. I would recommend this book to anyone.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 29, 2009

    Justin Wood

    Storm Thief by Chris Wooding takes the reader on an adventure through the fantasy world of Orokos. Storm Thief shows great examples of friendship and sacrifices made for friends. Wooding does a great job of telling the story of the poverty-stricken Rail and Moa and their goal of a better life.
    Orokos is a land of great mystery. Everything changes when probability storms strike the world, having the ability to change anything at any moment. Rail and Moa were born in the ghettoes of the strange land of Orokos, and are sent on missions of thievery by Anya-Jacana in exchange for money. During one of these missions, the friends find an ancient artifact from a different time. Instead of giving it to Anya-Jacana, they decide to run away with it to see if they can make a fortune off of it. While they are running away they meet a runaway golem, Vago. After reaching an underground city, with the leader being a friend of Moa, they find out of a plan to escape Orokos for a better life.
    However, all goes wrong when Vago disappears. Vago, who finds out he had been built by the government, can give away the secret of the planed escape. In punishment for bringing Vago into the community, Rail and Moa have to find Vago and stop him from telling the government, also known as the Protectorate, about the escape. Rail really doesn't want to leave Orokos, but since Moa does, he sacrifices himself to reach the Golem. Throw in ghost-like killer creatures called revenants, and Storm Thief proves to be a very interesting book.
    Chris Wooding does a great job of showing the power of friendship. Rail and Moa do things for each other even if it might not benefit themselves. The characters can also show the ability to care, such as Moa befriending the scary looking Vago, even though he proved to be dangerous. Although this wasn't necessarily a good decision in the end, Vago definitely appreciated this sign of gratitude by Moa. Rail also let Moa stay in his home prior to the beginning of the book, showing even more gratitude to a person in need.
    The fantasy world of Orokos is great to read about. It is very interesting in comparison to our (at least compared to Orokos) normal world. The spirit people, secret police, class levels, and other interesting aspects of Orokos make it both appealing, but confusing at the same time. It can be hard to follow what is going on in this bizarre world, as new elements of Orokos are added to the story as it keeps going. But in the end the interesting wins over the confusing, and the element of Orokos is a positive aspect to Storm Thief. Especially if you are a fantasy-lover.
    Storm Thief successfully rotates between the story of Rail and Moa, and the interesting mystery of the golem, Vago. Vago is my favorite character to follow in the book. Many questions arise when reading about him. Where's he from? How was he made? Who made him? He seems like a very innocent character, but them that will be doubted as he shows flashes of rage. If you read this book, you should be sure to closely examine the story of the hugely important character Vago.
    This book gets better as it keeps going. It makes you want to keep reading, as it is full if mystery. But the mystery can be a problem, because there is parts were you are in complete mystery over what's going on. I'd say this is a solid read for any reader, but I wouldn't recommend buying it. Try getting it at your library or borrowing it from a friend. If you love fantasy though, buy

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 29, 2009

    The Lives of Thieves. Storm Thief. Chris Wooding. New York: Scholastic Inc, 2006. 310 pages.

    Let me guess.
    You are looking for a good book - one where you not only READ the novel, but you are in the novel, experiencing every piece of the adventure, and feeling all the emotion? Written by Chris Wooding (an author who loves writing literature from novels to comics), Storm Thief is the perfect book if the search criteria includes danger and a heartfelt story of two unfortunate characters that have been trying to find themselves a better life. Orokos, for as long as anyone can remember, is a city in the middle of nowhere. There, these life-altering things called "probability storms" can hit at anytime, anywhere and can do anything - from rearranging the whole city to taking away something as vital as breath. Life in Orokos is terrible but there is no other place to go to - so far. I felt the emotion of the main characters - from the love to the hate - and found myself reading until the late hours of the night, not able to put the book down. There were some aspects of the book that could have been better, but overall - two thumbs up.
    Rail, a boy who needs a respirator to breathe, and Moa, a weak and scrawny girl, have spent their lives - since they met - stealing. Stealing to survive. Stealing for their boss, Anya-Jacana, who they later try to run away from.
    Rail and Moa are ghetto-folk. In simple terms - poor, disliked people that the Protectorate and Secret Police love to capture and imprison. "The Secret Police didn't release ghetto-folk."(pg 232). Obviously ghetto-folk are bad, sick, and disgusting people. That is, at least, how the Protectorate and Secret Police see them.
    Then, everything changes, from bad to worse. Rail and Moa, while on a job for Anya-Jacana, find this artifact - a Fade-Science Artifact - that they try to hide from her; that does not work out for them. They discover that this artifact, which only works when Moa wears it, opens doors and is later on a key to help unearth the secrets of Orokos. Rail and Moa try to keep information about the artifact hidden in hope that no one finds out what it does, but, as you may have predicted, that doesn't work out either.
    On their journey, they meet this golem - a creature with wings, a body of metal and flesh, and a brain that functions quicker than people think possible - who Moa shows kindness and love toward (from when they first met) and Rail shows complete and utter disgust and hate. When Vago, the golem, is captured by the Secret Police, he learns what he was, what he was meant to be, and what he really is. He is appalled at what he discovers about himself and finds out why he is this beast. He learns that his purpose was to deal with Revenants and the Taken. "The Revenants: invisible ghosts of energy that could possess the body of a person, could take them over entirely and live inside their skin. These possessed husks, animated on by the will of the Revenants, were called the taken. The Revenants were the enemy." (pg 91).
    Rail and Moa escape to Kilatas - a secret, underground city, with even more mysterious plans. When everything is finally going well for Moa, she and Rail are captured by the Secret Police for no reason whatsoever. They fear what will happen to them and wonder if they will ever leave Orokos - which is what their mission has been since they found the Fade-Science artifact. Storm Thief takes a surprising twist and leaves the reader hungry for more.
    This book has its ups and downs. More ups than downs, but in order to get a fair eva

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 29, 2009

    Storm Thief Book Review

    Storm Thief
    Chris Wooding
    New York
    Scholastic Inc. 2006
    310 Pages





    Storm Thief, written by Chris Wooding tells a thrilling and page-turning story with a few curve balls along the way. The plot itself is warped in a way which Chris Wooding has made his own. Teens all across the world will find it hard to put down this tale of a lone civilization on Orokos. I found myself reading deep into the night following Moa, Rail, and the half-human half-creature Vago along there expedition to unlock a great secret. Chris Wooding has done quite a number on Storm Thief.

    The novel starts off with a mysterious bird being chased by a "hunter in the sky". Immediately the story sucks you in with action and suspense. You then meet up with Moa and Rail, two teenagers who are poor, rejected, and oh yeah, thieves. Their master, whom they report to so they may find "jobs", takes a fifty percent cut on what they steel. Anya-Jacana is the head of many thieves who have been rejected and live in the Ghetto.

    When Rail and Moa have come across a sought after artifact, they see what great powers it has and how it can help them as thieves. Their goal: destroy the Vulcrum which is the headquarters of all chaos in Orokos, The Chaos Engine. The Chaos Engine changes the entire city of Orokos around. Every time there is a probability storm, everything in the city changes. A building might not be where it was the day before.

    This concept actually took me a while to understand. At first I thought that Chris Wooding meant it in a figurative sense, but in reality, he means in most literally. This was one of the few down sides to this book. Sometimes since it is a story so independent from any other novel, it's ideas or concepts can be a little hard to understand for a while. Once you do finally get a hold of the "pitches" Chris Wooding is throwing you, the book gets very exciting. Just when you think you have the story figured out, you get a curveball thrown your way.

    The Chaos Engine releases these ghosts like creatures called Revenants. Chris Wooding seemed to go all over the place with what these things are capable of. In the beginning, he describes them as small invisible orbs which take over people's bodies. In the heart of the action, Revenants are depicting terrifying images scaring people. The Revenants can fly through any wall or thing yet they decide to stay in only one part of Orokos while they can take over the entire city if they chose. This doesn't seem to make sense to me.

    Every part of this book, in my opinion, seemed to be leading up to a spectacular conclusion. The ending, was very weak.to say the least. It left off with a cliffhanger which left me with many questions. Too many questions. Don't get me wrong, cliffhangers are good. But Chris Wooding leaves out too much information in this ending. Considering the story is not apart of a series, Chris Wooding poorly executed the finale.

    Overall, Storm Thief provided a thrilling, page turner which may have had one too many curveballs. I would suggest this novel to any teen who likes an action and suspense story with many surprises.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 17, 2014

    Summary: The island city of Orokos has been trapped in isolation

    Summary: The island city of Orokos has been trapped in isolation for so long that the idea of a "world outside Orokos" had become a dream for only the naive and the fanatics. There is nothing outside of Orokos, and Orokos is nothing but city, ghetto, and the ruling Protectorate. Chaos storms wreak havoc upon Orokos and its inhabitants - picking people up and dropping them elsewhere; crippling some people while giving life to others. Even eyeshadow isn't too small to be overlooked by the probability storms.

    When Rail and Moa make a snap decision to hide an expensive artifact from their Thief Mistress, they must flee with an assassin hot on their trail. While running, they come across a golem, Vago, who'd been misplaced by a probability storm before he had any idea of who he was, where he was from, or why he was made. Where can these refugees go when the Protectorate rules with an iron fist - keeping ghetto-folk away from the city? Their path is simply a series of coincidences strung together...leading, where?

    My Thoughts: I really enjoyed this book. The characters were simple enough to flow well in a book for young teens, but each character had an interesting mixture of strengths and weaknesses. My favorite character was Vago, the Golem, whose process of self-discovery throughout the story made him intriguing.

    I loved the philosophical underpinnings of this story. It reminded us that the random power of entropy will always win. It always destroys what we have worked to build. Entropy is a non-stoppable machine. So why do we continue fighting it? Why do we continue dreaming of that "other world" when we have so much evidence that it doesn't exist? Why do we clutch hopefully to mere coincidences and use them to fuel our dreams?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2014

    Memorable

    I read this book years ago in middle school ( though it hada cooler cover in print) and I still remember it. This along with his other works like poison and a haunting are very good. I have wondered for a long time if this book ever had a sequel written for it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2013

    LOVE IT!!!! inspiring the best ive read yet. amazing really real

    LOVE IT!!!! inspiring the best ive read yet. amazing really really amazing.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2012

    I looooove this book it is amazing.

    This book will have you on end it has adventure horror and even a little bit of romance.i reccomend this book to the whole entire world. :)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Twisted Propable Faith

    Storm ThiefBy: Chris WoodingNew York: Scholastic Inc. 2007Page #'s 310Look out Atlantis, another hidden civilization has arrived! Storm Thief, unleashes the "possibility" of looking at an advanced civilization in the future. But, the future is grim, characters such as Rail and Moa, experience the horror of control throughout the land. These two thieves venture out of the "city of chaos", and find the secret behind the land of Orokos. The divine ruler of Orokos is called The Patrician, which seems to have the gift of knowledge and eternal life. The Patrician defends the civilized people of Orokos from the demon sprits called the Revenants. The future holds so much wizardry, when the two thieves discover the hidden truth behind the Orokos and find they're way out. Making this the most exciting book to read if you enjoy the thrill of excitement and love to venture new lands to unlock the mysteries may lie.Storm Thief utilizes your imagination to see the twisted world that holds secrets to life. The hidden secrets are portrayed as Rail and Moa venture into the outskirts of Orokos to find the answer about a specific creature, a bird. To accompany the thieves on their journey out of the city is a peculiar looking human, which has human-like flesh and other mechanical parts to make him an ugly help for the team. They then have to endure close deaths until they reach the "safe" area of Orokos. That area is known for its poverty and desperate freedom from the Patrician.I have read many adventure books that show characters leaving a hostile area to another place, and meeting new people, the character then creates a new life, and then "they live happily ever after, the end", boooring! This book takes the three adventures back to the city, and speaks to the "ghost" who archived all of Orokos' past. While I read this book, I was engulfed into the mystical world of the future, and the details given in this book seem to jump out of the page. Making this one of the best books I had ever read.Though, I still wonder about the leader of the thief's, or Anya-Jacana, it seemed like she was more like a greedy obese person. But I really wonder what was here past, how does she became the head of the criminal world in Orokos. Orokos was not just a place were they was poverty and misfortune, but there is also a wealthy layer. Vago, was first introduced in the story as a servant that did the bidding of a wealthy toymaker. Vago then fled out of the wealthy palace, the book did not tell anymore information about the toymaker's family, which I wonder what happened to the family after Vago left. But the most important question in my mind is what ever happen to Rail and Moa? Towards the end of Storm Thief, the three escape Orokos via boat in search for foreign lands. It seemed like a happy ending for Rail and Moa, but the book does not tell what ever happened to them, I hate cliffhangers.Storm Thief, is a book that utilizes the main parts of the brain, the thinking and the imagination portions. In a book, these are especially useful for a reader to fulfill the thought and world inside the pages. In Storm Thief, it followed through with these utilizations thoroughly and perfectly. It made me think, it made my emotions flare up, it made me read the book as if I was watching a movie. A good book deserves an award and apparently Louisiana Young Reader's Choice Awards in 2009 did give it an award. I just hope the author of this book, Chris Wooding, takes care of his award because the probability of the "thief" stealing his award is greater than the number of Revenants in the modern world.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Cool

    Storm Thief. Chris Wooding. New York: Scholastic Inc, 2006. 310 pages.Storm Thief, a story written by British Writer, Chris Wooding, was a so and so for me. The concept of the sci-fi novel was a bit too far fetched for my mind. Orokos, the chaos city, often has the abnormal storms called probability storms. As the name suggests, there is an endless amount of possibilities as to what might happen to the things it hits. Rail, a ghetto kid, alongside his close friend, Moa, have the unfortunate luck of living in such an accursed place. Wooding portrays Orokos as a chaotic place, with panic when the fateful storm hits. Rail is a victim of the storm, and as a result, he is now unable to breath without his respirator. He owes his life to Anya-Janca, the thief mistress. Moa was a deserter discovered by Rail. Since the two only had each other, they grew close. They both now work for the mistress, and set off on a mission of larceny. They come across a strange artifact, which starts it all. They reuse to give it to the mistress, so they flee their home, only to be pursued by Finch and other subordinates of the mistress. While being chased, the two encounter a strange creature. A golem named Vago. With most of his body made of machine, the image of him is pretty graphic Moa befriends the golem almost immediately, but Rail does not recognize him as an ally, but eventually works together with him, as their common goal is to protect Moa. Wooding highlights the ideas of hope, dreams, determination, and above all, friendship through out the course of the story. The group of three face many hardships, such as, having to go head on with revenants, ghost like entities produced by the chaos engine, the source of the probability storms. Revenants can kill humans just by passing through them, and are able to possess humans too. When a human is possessed by a revenant, on is then called a Taken, which can kill any human with a single touch. Moa is nearly killed while being carried by Vago, when a revenant swept through both of them. After the near death experience, the group arrive at Kilatas. They find out Kilatas is planning an escape from Orokos, to a new land. Rail is strongly against this. Arguments between Rail, who wants to stay and attain a better life using the artifact they have, and Moa, who wants to start anew in the land beyond the horizon, posed a rift in their relationship. Meanwhile, Vago escaped to continues his earlier objective of finding his master. He is later captured by Bane, the Chief of the Protectorate, a "peace keeping force" in Orokos. Vago then undergoes conditioning in order to make sure he follows the Protectorate's commands. Kittiwake, leader of Kilatas, recognized Vago as a spy and a threat to them. She therefore sends Rail and Moa to retrieve him, otherwise, she will not allow either of them to escape Orokos with the rest of Kilatas.The conclusion Wooding has given is apparently a cliffhanger, leaving the reader a question in mind. What happens next? What happens to Rail and Moa? To Vago? Throughout the story, the author has left me with confusion. To me, the concept of the probability storms and Fade is pretty far fetched, as what a sci-fi novel should be. Maybe I'm just not a big sci-fi fan, but that was one of the weak points for me. The vividness of the writing was the good point for me. When reading the book, I felt as if I was watching a movie. The clarity of the authors descriptions of the appearances and the surrounding helped the reader visualize well and see what was happening. Wooding attempts action scenes which I think were fairly executed. Like a movie in my head. The importance of friendship is stressed in the story. How important it is to stick with your friends, as well as problems friendships may eventually come upon. I recommend this book to any sci-fi fan craving for am interesting, out of this world concept!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Storm Thief.

    March 7, 2010Storm ThiefChris WoodingStorm Thief. Chris Wooding. Broadway, New York: Scholastic Inc., 2006. 307pages.Ever hear of The Twilight Zone? It is a TV show where anything can happen, where anyone can be anything, where the greatest fear is fear itself. I am only saying this because Storm Thief and The Twilight Zone have a common theme to the story. Anything can happen. Storm Thief, by Chris Wooding, is a story of imagination. The world of Orokos, the island of which Storm Thief takes place, is home to many. However, outside of the island "life does not exist".Rail, a young man faces the cruel world of Orokos, lives in the ghettos of Orokos and makes day to day by stealing. Rail, the unlucky character he is, also was hit by a probability storm, he also was not one to forgive and forget. Page 46, paragraph 3, "He wouldn't accept what had been done to him by the probability storm. Why couldn't he understand that change just happened, that there was nothing anyone could do to prevent it". Probability storms are the connection between The Twilight Zone and Storm Thief. Probability storms can alter, annihilate, vanish anything it touches. Due to the storm Rail now has to wear a respirator to breath. Moa, Rails apprentice, is frail, which drags Rail down some times during a get-a-way. Both Rail and Moa work for a thief lord named, Anya-Jacana. This common job of stealing they did every day, gets turned upside down when Moa and Rail are sent to steal from the Mozgas. The Mozgas stole something from Anya-Janaca, as ironic as that sounds, Anya-Janaca wants her goods back. The task on hand was a little bit challenging for the duo.Aside from the normal loot they usually find, the Mozga were holding some ancient disk, soon to be discovered as Faded Technology. Even after it is determined as Faded Technology the two did not know that the same power of probability storms were in their hands. Thinking that Anya-Janaca did not know that the disk was there, they took it for themselves. But, Anya-Janaca sent them there mainly for that purpose, to retrieve the disk. Vago, a golem mentioned earlier in the book, allies with Moa and Rail and later on becomes great friends with Moa. Rail on the other hand wants to ditch Vago, kind of mean of Rail. But, Rail has his reasons, Vago may be strong, immune to aether but he is also gigantic and ditzy, and when you are a thief, always trying to hide, a huge body is not the best thing to have with you. Other people do not like Vago either, page 32; paragraph 3, "Grandpa says you're a golem!' Ephemera had crowed. 'You didn't have a mama or a papa. Someone ade you. Aren't you ugly?" Vago could or is considered ugly, but you don't just go shouting it in his face. So, the three, Rail, Moa and Vago the golem are being pursued by Anya-Janaca, Finch, Secret Police, the occasional probability storm and roaming revenants.The setting of the book, Orokos and how if anyone ventures off the island, they will be destroyed by droids, reminds me of The Matrix directed by the Wachowski Brothers. It's the life of people controlling your life, trying to make a perfect world. Orokos is the only place where "life exists". No one is allowed off the island. I also think that this Chris Wooding's theory about life in outer space. You will not know if there is life form out there unless you voyage far enough to the point of sacrifice. Orokos' citizens want to leave the island, but they cannot, so they tell themselves that life does not exist outside of Orokos. They do not want to take a chance outside of their own little world.There were a couple of things that made me chuckle here and there. Chris replaced "freaking" with "frecking". Page 43, paragraph 4 is just one out of the many examples that kept me laughing, "You frecking what? Moa cried." Moa is usually the only who says "frecking" but when Rail finds out Moa is alive towards the middle, he uses it too! I laughed on page 141, paragraph 5, "She's alive, Vago. She's frecking alive."This book was definitely a success. I mean the book was unbelievable, it has a story of no other. Story of two thieves in a world of chaos, who may become the most powerful people alive?

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  • Posted April 9, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Storm Thief

    Rail and Moa are thieves in the only city of Orokos (and by only I mean only - there is nothing else). While on a mission they discover a piece of ancient technology and they don't turn it in to their patron. This is all the start of a very grand adventure as Rail and Moa run from the secret police, monsters knows as Revenants, and the thugs sent by their thieve's patron.

    Along the way the meet a very interesting "person". A golem named Vago that has quite an interesting past,of only he could remember what it was. Together the three flee across the city looking for a new and better life.

    This was a fantastic story. The characters are fantastic and come to life on the pages. Their relationship is unique and wonderful to read about. They are all bound together by a fate that is greater than any one of them.

    5/5

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  • Posted April 8, 2011

    MUST Read! LOVE IT WITH A PASSION!!

    I picked up this book my freshman year in high school because I needed a book for my AR points in my English class. I read through this book in a matter of three days (& I'm a very slow reader!) I just couldn't put this book down! Chris Wooding made me feel emotions towards the characters that he had created. I have read this book multiple times and every time it still makes a very good read. I recommend this to every person who wants adventure with twists and turns that will shock you. I will admit that I had drown to love the characters and was sad that there was no sequel to this fabulous book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2010

    Twisted Probability

    Title: Storm Thief
    By: Chris Wooding
    New York: Scholastic Inc. 2007
    Page #'s 310
    Look out Atlantis, another hidden civilization has arrived! Storm Thief, unleashes the "possibility" of looking at an advanced civilization in the future. But, the future is grim, and the characters such as Rail and Moa, experience the horror of control throughout the land. These two thieves venture out of the "city of chaos", and find the secret behind the land of Orokos. The divine ruler of Orokos, called The Patrician, seems to have the gift of knowledge and eternal life. The Patrician defends the civilized people of Orokos from the demon sprits called the Revenants. Revenants are evil sprits which can poses dead humans called Taken; "The mere touch of a Taken meant death" (Page 93), when touched by their aura. The future holds so much wizardry, such as a gadget that can "open doors, anywhere" (Page 52) The two thieves, Moa and Rail discover the hidden truth behind the Orokos and find they're way out. Making this the most exciting book to read if you enjoy the thrill of excitement and the love of venturing to new lands to unlock the mysteries that may lie.

    Storm Thief uses imagination to allow you to see the twisted world that holds secrets to life. The hidden secrets are portrayed as Rail and Moa go out and ventures into the outskirts of Orokos to find the answer about a specific creature, a bird. "Well I'm no expert, but I think you've got something quite unusual here" (Page 35). Then from that moment on, the journey began. To accompany the thieves on their journey out of the city is a peculiar looking human, which has human-like flesh and other mechanical parts to make him an ugly help for the team. Throughout the entire story Vago and a few other people had wondered "what were you made for?"(Page 57). To search for the answers, they have to endure close deaths and violent regions until they reach the "safe" area of Orokos. That area is known for its poverty and desperate freedom from the Patrician where they find the answer.

    I have read many adventure books that show characters leaving a hostile area to another place, and meeting new people, the character then creates a new life, and then "they live happily ever after, the end", boring! This book takes the three adventures back to the city, and speaks to the "ghost" who archived all of Orokos' past. While I read this book, I was engulfed into the mystical world of the future, and the details given in this book seem to jump out of the page, making this one of the best books I had ever read.

    Title: Storm Thief
    By: Chris Wooding
    New York: Scholastic Inc. 2007
    Page #'s 310

    Look out Atlantis, another hidden civilization has arrived! Storm Thief, unleashes the "possibility" of looking at an advanced civilization in the future. But, the future is grim, and the characters such as Rail and Moa, experience the horror of control throughout the land. These two thieves venture out of the "city of chaos", and find the secret behind the land of Orokos. The divine ruler of Orokos, called The Patrician, seems to have the gift of knowledge and eternal life. The Patrician defends the civilized people of Orokos from the demon sprits called the Revenants. Revenants are evil sprits which can poses dead humans called Taken; "The mere touch of a Taken meant death" (Page 93), when touched by their aura. The future holds so much wizardry, such as a gadget that can "open doors, anywhere" (Page 52) Th

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  • Posted March 7, 2010

    Storm Thief Chris Wooding New York: Scholastic Inc,2006. 310 pages.

    This book is an story packed with Visual details that make the story line seem like its real. The story is about two Kids Named Moa And Rail who are theives with their Friend A Mechanical half-human Golem named Vago who has wings but not used to fly but to glide around the air, trying to protect and item known as The Artifact and Destroy the Chaos Engine which lives inside the city of Orokos.The Choas Engine is A Machine that can Basically do anything that involves Drastic changes or Altercations. In the story there are many difficult obstacles that Moa,Rail,and Vago have to go through. Such as going face to face with Taken's: monsters that are made of aether that if they touch any human it's instant death,Revenants: ghost like monsters that can walk through walls and fly through the air and other monsters. Several times they almost experience death, but somehow they manage to escape it and contiue protecting the artifact.Overall i think the book was great. Every line and word made me feel like i was experiencing the book at first hand. It used visual contexts and other descriptions to make me feel that i was actually there.In the end however was a complete let down. The book left off with many unanswered questions. Basically too me that was the only downside. To me Chris Wooding should make this into a series to answer all those unanswered questions. Overall I recommend this book to any Kid or Teen that likes Action Packed Adventure stories.

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  • Posted March 8, 2010

    :D

    Storm Thief. Chris Wooding. USA : Scholastic, 2006, 310 pgs.
    Chris Wooding the author of Storm Thief gives the adventure for young adults. He tells a story of friendship, loyalty, and trust through the journey of Rail and Moa, two characters from the ghettos of Orokos. Storm Thief, a novel, of what I think is filled with long-lasting excitement along with the characters extreme Journey. It leaves you with cliffhanger questions like "are they going to make it" or "will they escape" until the end.
    How far can friendship go? Rail is a hard working boy that takes risks to survive life in the ghetto. He would do anything to protect Moa no matter what. Moa is a dreamer. She dreams about a world beyond Orokos. She is weaker than most but her dreams and hopes stay strong. With totally different personalities, Rail and Moa managed to work out their problems. Together they make a living by stealing for a woman called Anya- Jacana. She tells them to steal from homes in return Rail and Moa get a little reward to keep them living. When Rail and Moa are in a stranger's house they find an artifact that's quite valuable. Deciding not to bring the artifact to Anya- Jacana opened a door with danger for Rail and Moa. Anya- Jacana sends out Finch, a boy who works for her, to follow Rail and Moa to retrieve this interesting artifact. With Rail making all the life threatening decisions symbolized that's he is a brave and committed character.
    Their journey with the probability storms, Revenants, Protectorates and ghosts creates an adventure in this fantasy world. When you need something to open up your mind the Storm Thief is one of the books that's a guarantee. Even though the novel portrays a fantasy genre you can still connect with some of experiences in your life. Moa talks about an outside world of Orokos that made me ask a qualm to myself if there even could be another world beyond Earth.
    While the story moves along with Moa and Rail, in-between, the author create another story with another set of characters (Vago, Cretch, and Ephemera). Later on in the novel the two sets of characters bumps into each other in an alleyway (Vago, Rail, and Moa). With the background stories of the characters gives readers the understanding why the characters ended up in the same place. I was flabbergasted how the author created two storylines so perfectly together building up to their meeting point.
    As well, The Storm Thief contained between the lines messages throughout the novel. Like the aspect of trust. I first saw the theme of trust in the beginning of the book, that was direct and straight forth on page 9 " Rail thought they could do it, and she trusted him." That quote was the only quote that expressed the trust theme directly to the readers. Since the quote was in the very beginning of the novel readers doesn't expect that trust could possibly be a theme. Later on, more and more themes of trust was expressed, but this time indirectly. The section of pages 78-82 is where Moa meets Vago and accepts him they way he is. She then trusts the golem, Vago, to not harm them. Especially in paragraph 4 on page 79 continues to show the trust theme ""We're suppose to be keeping a low profile!" Rail cries. " You just gave him our names! You want to get caught?""He's in trouble!" Moa snapped. "Can't you see that!"" Trust is shown here by Moa telling a complete stranger their names. Why she trusted Vago; no one knows. But if she

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  • Posted March 7, 2010

    Storm Thief, A must Read.

    A book written by a British, sci-fi loving author, Storm Thief will keep your imagination fueled and the adrenaline running. Telling a story of a dystopian city in the middle of and ocean, it combines the science fiction genre with Gothic arts and a corrupted, futuristic setting. With two puny main characters and a monstrous, synthetic creature looking for answers, this book is a perfect blend of a powerful story and amazing action sequences.

    The book has an overall dark and mysterious theme along with several tense scenes of action. Not only does it have such a widespread list of how the setting affects the characters, but it also has a shallow background explanation in the book. In the city of Orokos, a team of scientists build a engine that can generate probability storms, a wave of energy that can alter anything in Orokos. It is completely random, and cannot be controlled. Orokos is divided into classes, based on wealth. The majority of the city is on the lower class, or the ghetto-folk. The two main characters, Rail and Moa, are nothing more than two outcasts in an anarchic city. There is also another character, Vago, who is a golem, in other words, a bulky, robotic sentinel with wings. The plot involves a white bird flying through Vago's window one day and crashes, collected by Vago and tied around his neck. On another side of the story, it involves Rail and Moa, two thieves working for Anya- Jacana, otherwise known as the thief mistress. Rail has his lungs incapacitated by a probability storm, and therefore must always wear a respirator strapped over his back and a mask over his face. Moa is a lost girl who is befriended by Rail after losing her father.
    Vago is a much unexpected character. He appears in a bedroom of a house, with no memory of who he was. He is accepted by the house's owner, Gretch to stay there. But soon, Gretch kicks him out of the house after breaking one of his mechanisms. Vago then lurks the streets, attacked by citizens and hunted down by the authorities. On the other side of Orokos, Rail and Moa capture a chest of treasures, and brings it to Anya-Jacana. Rail steals an artifact from the chest, and Moa tries it on her hand. Anya-Jacana realizes that it is missing and sends some of her thieves to hunt them down and recover the artifact.

    Moa discovers that the artifact she has on her hand can opens holes in solid matter, and therefore allowing her to travel through it. It can also only be used by her Rail and Moa both escape the captors, only to be exposed to the vast city of Orokos. They're still being hunted by Anya-Jancana, and while running from her thieves, they confront Vago inside an alley. Moa is interested by the bird around Vago's neck, she finds that it is completely foreign to the city of Orokos and takes Vago along with her so that it can be studied by Kittiwake, a clan inside the class of the ghetto-folk. In order to reach there, the trio must cross the Revenant district. The Revenants are basically ghost -like orbs, able to pass through sold matter and kill any human with one touch. "The Revenants: invisible ghosts of energy that could possess the body of a person, could take them over entirely and live inside their skin. These possessed husks, animated on by the will of the Revenants, were called the taken" (pg 91). The only way a person can see them is through a type of visor called a glimmer visor. Also, the only way a Revenant can be destroyed is by being shot with a aethe

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