Storming Little Round Top

Storming Little Round Top

4.0 2
by Philip Tucker
     
 

The fight for Little Round Top on July 2, 1863, is forever etched in the annals of America's Civil War. The heroic defense of the high ground by Joshua Chamberlain and the men of the 20th Maine is one of the most famous incidents in American history, made more so by its powerful depiction in the film Gettysburg. There are numerous written accounts of the

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Overview

The fight for Little Round Top on July 2, 1863, is forever etched in the annals of America's Civil War. The heroic defense of the high ground by Joshua Chamberlain and the men of the 20th Maine is one of the most famous incidents in American history, made more so by its powerful depiction in the film Gettysburg. There are numerous written accounts of the Union defenders on Little Round Top but considerably less has been written—up to now—about the Confederate attackers who charged up the hill and faced an even more desperate challenge than those who defended it. Unique and colorful, this new study brings to life the men and officers of the 15th Alabama who gathered that day to assault the Union flank. The lively narration of this dramatic engagement is both detailed and authoritative. Veteran Civil War author Phillip Tucker colorfully evokes the men and the times—from descriptions of the Alabamans' Chattahoochee River valley home to sketches of the lives and personalities of William C. Oates and other key members of the regiment.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Tucker (Burnside's Bridge) is chief historian of the 81st Training Wing at Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi, Mississippi, and his latest book attempts to settle one of the enduring controversies about the battle of Gettysburg: which Confederate unit made the deepest incursion into Union territory? Whereas most of the glory has fallen on Pickett's Charge, Tucker argues that the honor of the "high water mark of the Confederacy" belongs to the 15th Alabama, and that the "forgotten story of the 15th Alabama's achievements on July 2 needs to be told in detail for the first time," with full knowledge that it was a devastating loss for the South. This he does, revising previous histories by using unpublished letters and combing the archives for other testimony of the Confederates' storming of that famous rocky hill. Tucker brings the battle to life with thick descriptions of these dramatic events in a volume sure to please Civil War buffs. (Sept.) Copyright 2003 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780306811463
Publisher:
Da Capo Press
Publication date:
08/29/2002
Edition description:
1ST
Pages:
344
Sales rank:
1,428,102
Product dimensions:
6.22(w) x 9.28(h) x 1.13(d)

Meet the Author

Phillip Thomas Tucker is the chief historian of the 81st Training Wing at Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi, Mississippi. He is the author of The Confederacy's Fighting Chaplain, winner of the Douglas Southall Freeman Award; and Burnside's Bridge, a History Book Club selection.

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Storming Little Round Top 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Storming Little Round is the most detailed, in-depth, and intimate look at the climactic struggle for the strategic hill known as Little Round Top. Tucker brings the bloody contest for the rocky hilltop at the southern end of the battlefield to life as never before.  This deeply-researched book offers a host of new insights and views of the decisive showdown between the 15th Alabama and the 20th Maine.  I very much enjoyed the sense of drama and tension that was built-up throughout the narrative in what is a great story.   From a good many rare letters, diaries, and journals of participants, Tucker has revealed the full story of the men who almost captured Little Round Top on the most important day at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. Most of all, this work has made an important contribution and key addition to Gettysburg historiography.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Phillip Thomas Tucker is a good researcher, writes in an entertaining sytle but repeats himself way too much in this book. Maps and diagrams would have helped the reader follow the narrative. I think Mr. Tucker has used the late Mr. Shaara's style in blending fact with fiction. Although the 15th Alabama is to be admired for its' bravery, Mr. Tucker greatly overestimates what the regiment could have done. He underestimates the fighting capacity of the Union army during the battle and I am a born Georgian. Burnside's Bridge was a much better effort.