The Story of a Nobody

Overview

Hesperus Press, as suggested by their Latin motto, Et remotissima prope, is dedicated to bringing near what is far—far both in space and time. Works by illustrious authors, often unjustly neglected or simply little known in the English–speaking world, are made accessible through a completely fresh editorial approach or new translations. Through these short classic works, which feature forewords by leading contemporary authors, the modern reader will be introduced to the greatest writers of Europe and America. An ...
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Overview

Hesperus Press, as suggested by their Latin motto, Et remotissima prope, is dedicated to bringing near what is far—far both in space and time. Works by illustrious authors, often unjustly neglected or simply little known in the English–speaking world, are made accessible through a completely fresh editorial approach or new translations. Through these short classic works, which feature forewords by leading contemporary authors, the modern reader will be introduced to the greatest writers of Europe and America. An elegantly designed series of exceptional books.
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Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
In this affecting (1892-93) novella, which shares many of the structural and tonal qualities of its author's later plays, an aging and ailing terrorist (the story's narrator) finds employment as a servant in a household promising access to the enemy he plans to assassinate: the "famous statesman" who is his employer Orlov's elderly father. The narrator's plot never comes to fruition. Instead, his idealism is gradually eroded by his involvement with the egoistic Orlov, the latter's sycophantic and foolish friends, and particularly the weak Zinaida Fyodorovna, who leaves her husband, only to be betrayed and abandoned by her lover. A compact symphony of frustrated emotions, incompatibility and estrangement, destroyed dreams and bitter compromises: the very essence of Chekhov.
From the Publisher

"Revived in this sure-footed translation by Hugh Aplin, Chekhov's novella deserves to be much better known."  —Independent

"A wonderful piece of literature. I know this because I have read it several times, and it is only excellent writing that improves with rereading."  —Louis de Bernières, author, Corelli's Mandolin

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781847491893
  • Publisher: Oneworld Classics
  • Publication date: 5/1/2012
  • Series: Oneworld Classics
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 160
  • Sales rank: 1,482,870
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 7.80 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Anton Chekhov (1860–1904) was a short story writer, but is perhaps best known for his plays, among them The Cherry Orchard, The Seagull, Three Sisters, and Uncle Vanya. Hugh Aplin has translated Mikhail Bulgakov's A Dog's Heart and The Fatal Eggs, Fyodor Dostoevsky's The Eternal Husband, and Mikhail Kuzmin's Wings.

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Table of Contents

Foreword vii
Introduction xiii
The Story of a Nobody 1
Notes 98
Biographical note 99
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