The Story Of Little Black Sambo

The Story Of Little Black Sambo

4.5 16
by Helen Bannerman
     
 

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First published in 1899, "The Story of Little Black Sambo" is a popular tale about a little boy using his wits to overcome danger.

Overview

First published in 1899, "The Story of Little Black Sambo" is a popular tale about a little boy using his wits to overcome danger.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781619491670
Publisher:
Empire Books
Publication date:
12/23/2011
Pages:
30
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.06(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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Story of Little Black Sambo 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 20 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Some people look for anything negative or a reason to holler about racism. Even Huck Finn, a wonderful nonracist story, has received a bum rap. Books were written in the time they are set,and LITTLE BLACK SAMBO is a wonderful story that I've enjoyed since I was a child. I am African American, and I find nothing offensive about this story. READ THIS STORY, ALL PEOPLES, AND ENJOY!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This ebook is a scan of a collorfully illustrated, pre-1910, children's book that actually contains two short stories. The scan must have been edited since the one reviewer who complained OCR errors made the ebook unreadable. There are few such errors now. Except for the first sentence of each story, I did not notice any intrusive errors. Some of the illustrations are not as well located as they would be in the hardcopy, but this ebook still benefits from their inclusion. Unfortunately, illustrations that include a black person are based on stereotypes that, although based on a one-time reality, are now considered unflattering at best. The first tale is "Little Black Sambo," a delightful fantasy about a quick-witted black boy, his loving parents, and what happens to four tigers who originally wanted to eat the boy. The story is now considered politically incorrect if not downright racist, but there is nothing in the text itself that would result in such a judgement. The problem is that people ended up using the name Sambo in a deragotory manner. With more than 50 years of such name use/abuse, it is no wonder that the story is now thought of in the same manner as the name. The second tale in the book is a retelling, for children, of the story of Topsy's childhood from "Uncle Tom's Cabin." Enough said for those familiar with the original. This ebook is a great snapshot of children's literature in the USA circa 1910.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Practically impossible to read this eBook because the scan has never been reviewed and edited. Way too many uncorrected OCR errors.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
JudithAR More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed reading the full history of this wonderful story of a young boy outwitting the tiger.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I found the book on Barnes and Nobles web-site, called the store and ordered it. It came in incredibly fast and in perfect condition. My son was thrilled to have the book! It brought back many memories of me reading it to him as a child. I would highly recommend Barnes and Noble for extremely helpful service.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Little Black Sambo is a small, cute little book and I first read it when I was really young. I checked it out at the library every time that I went there. Then the library told me that their copy was lost or out of print. So I tried to find it at other libraries but I had no luck. It is my favorite book in the whole world.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Was the very first book I borrowed from a public library in 1980.It was a story I have never forgotten and it will always be my favorite.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love this book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
While The Story of Little Black Sambo by Helen Bannerman has proven to be a much loved classic by many readers, you should exercise caution when preparing to read it to young children. The storyline is fairly basic ¿ Little Black Sambo is pursued by tigers in the jungle, and in order to appease them, he gives each of them an article of clothing. Then, the tigers end up fighting with each other, and Little Black Sambo goes home and eats pancakes. The plot seems harmless, but it is the negative undertones of the book that create its controversy. The term `sambo¿ carries the heavy weight of controversy itself; during slavery, it was an extremely negative and derogatory term used for African-American slaves, labeling them as shiftless, lazy, listless, and, quite frankly, dumb. This word has carried its controversy ever since the days of slavery, and it is still considered a very offensive term to use toward African-Americans. Because of this, allowing children to read a book where the main character¿s name is Sambo introduces them to this negative term that should not even be in their vocabulary. Doing so runs the risk of having children deem all African-Americans as `sambo¿ without understanding the term, thus creating racial controversy. In addition, the illustrations in the book do not portray African-Americans in a good light; rather, they portray quite barbaric and primitive characters that perpetuate many racial stereotypes. Overall, I suggest holding off on having children read this book until they are old enough to understand concepts such as slavery, racism, and stereotypes.