The Story of Lynx

Overview

"In olden days, in a village peopled by animal creatures, lived Wild Cat (another name for Lynx). He was old and mangy, and he was constantly scratching himself with his cane. From time to time, a young girl who lived in the same cabin would grab the cane, also to scratch herself. In vain Wild Cat kept trying to talk her out of it. One day the young lady found herself pregnant; she gave birth to a boy. Coyote, another inhabitant of the village, became indignant. He talked all of the population into going to live elsewhere and abandoning the old

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Overview

"In olden days, in a village peopled by animal creatures, lived Wild Cat (another name for Lynx). He was old and mangy, and he was constantly scratching himself with his cane. From time to time, a young girl who lived in the same cabin would grab the cane, also to scratch herself. In vain Wild Cat kept trying to talk her out of it. One day the young lady found herself pregnant; she gave birth to a boy. Coyote, another inhabitant of the village, became indignant. He talked all of the population into going to live elsewhere and abandoning the old Wild Cat, his wife, and their child to their fate . . . "

So begins the Nez Percé myth that lies at the heart of The Story of Lynx, Claude Lévi-Strauss's most accessible examination of the rich mythology of American Indians. In this wide-ranging work, the master of structural anthropology considers the many variations in a story that occurs in both North and South America, but especially among the Salish-speaking peoples of the Northwest Coast. He also shows how centuries of contact with Europeans have altered the tales.

Lévi-Strauss focuses on the opposition between Wild Cat and Coyote to explore the meaning and uses of gemellarity, or twinness, in Native American culture. The concept of dual organization that these tales exemplify is one of non-equivalence: everything has an opposite or other, with which it coexists in unstable tension. In contrast, Lévi-Strauss argues, European notions of twinness—as in the myth of Castor and Pollux—stress the essential sameness of the twins. This fundamental cultural difference lay behind the fatal clash of European and Native American peoples.

The Story of Lynx addresses and clarifies all the major issues that have occupied Lévi-Strauss for decades, and is the only one of his books in which he explicitly connects history and structuralism. The result is a work that will appeal to those interested in American Indian mythology.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Beginning with the antagonism between Lynx and Coyote in a Nez Perc Indian myth, eminent French structural anthropologist Lvi-Strauss explores recurrent polarities-e.g., sky versus earth, external reality vs. the body-in myths of the Tlingit, Kwakiutl, Tsimshian and other Amerindian peoples of the Pacific Northwest. He recounts narratives of twins with special powers, of a girl rebelling against marriage, of destructive celestial fire putting an end to the first humans. Unraveling a tangled skein of related myths, with parallels from Brazil, Peru and Mexico, Lvi-Strauss identifies a commonly shared mindset that explains creation in terms of dualistic forces in perpetual disequilibrium. This dense, intriguing study offers the perspectives of one of anthropology's giants on Native American mythology and culture. Photos. (May)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780226474724
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication date: 12/28/1996
  • Edition description: 1
  • Pages: 294
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Table of Contents

Translator's Acknowledgments
Preface
Pt. One: On the Side of the Fog
1. An Untimely Pregnancy
2. Coyote, Father and Son
3. The Dentalia Thieves
4. A Myth to Go Back in Time
5. The Fateful Sentence
6. A Visit to the Mountain Goats
Pt. Two: Breaks through the Clouds
7. The Child Taken by the Owl
8. Jewels and Wounds
9. The Son of the Root
10. Twins: Salmon, Bears, and Wolves
11. Meteorology at Home
12. Jewels and Food
13. From the Moon to the Sun
14. The Dog Husband
Pt. Three: On the Side of the Wind
15. The Capture of the Wind
16. Indian Myths, French Folktales
17. The Last Return of the Bird-Nester
18. Rereading Montaigne
19. The Bipartite Ideology of the Amerindians
Notes
Bibliography
Index

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