The Story of Massachusetts

The Story of Massachusetts

by Edward Everett Hale
     
 

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Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally

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Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781290161022
Publisher:
HardPress Publishing
Publication date:
01/10/2012
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.83(d)

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CHAPTER V. THE FIIJST WINTER. OF all lotteries, the risks are the most terrible in that where one chooses a new home ; worst of all, probably, when he changes from continent to continent in the choosing. When Winthrop and his friends had fairly surveyed the scene of their new empire, there must, even to the most philosophical, have been a disappointment. The pastures around Salem are now much what they were then. An ungracious granite protrudes from the scanty soil, in knolls, without even much picturesqueness, and promises no crops beyond that of lichens. Winthrop notes in his journal that they were regaled with strawberries on landing; and they were born into their new life with all the glories of June. But they were not satisfied with Naumkeag or Salem for the capital seat of their settlement, and pushed up the Bay to see the mouth of Charles River and of Mystic River. At Charlestown there was a settlement of nine persons, who had joined Walford the smith, who once held that peninsula alone; and here they brought the ships as they arrived in successive weeks, and to this place they transferred the stores which had been discharged at Salem. The number of emigrants who arrived in seventeen vessels this summer was not quite one thousand. Of these nearly one hundred returned in the ships. They lost time in the first summer by a doubt as to the place of the capital. The first intention was to place it three leagues up Charles River, or, as Fuller says, at the " head of the river." By any reasonable measurement this would bring it to the mouth of Stony Brook in Waltham. And since Mr. Horsford found there what may be thought a ditch for a palisade, Mr. Winsor has suggested thatpossibly this spot was, at one moment, selected for the capital. But it is hard to say why No...

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