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Story of Sacajawea: Guide to Lewis and Clark
     

Story of Sacajawea: Guide to Lewis and Clark

4.5 2
by Della Rowland
 

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As a young girl, Sacajawea was separated from her family when she was captured by a band of Minnetaree warriors and taken to be their slave. Several years later, she was bought by a French fur trader to be his wife. Then, in 1804, when she was only sixteen years old, Sacajawea met Lewis and Clark.

Carrying her infant son on her back, Sacajawea helped guide the

Overview

As a young girl, Sacajawea was separated from her family when she was captured by a band of Minnetaree warriors and taken to be their slave. Several years later, she was bought by a French fur trader to be his wife. Then, in 1804, when she was only sixteen years old, Sacajawea met Lewis and Clark.

Carrying her infant son on her back, Sacajawea helped guide the famous team of explorers through the uncharted terrain of the western United States. Her courageous efforts made an important contribution to America's history.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Sacajawea's life is the stuff of real Wild West adventure: born a Shoshoni, she was captured at 13 by a hostile tribe and forced into slavery, then married off to a cantankerous French trapper. While caring for her infant son she served as an interpreter and sometimes guide for Lewis and Clark on their famous expedition. Unfortunately, this rather tedious biography doesn't do Sacajawea's story justice. Rowland's prose is bland and interest quickly flags. To her credit, the author researched her subject meticulously, and she manages to keep from straying into the realm of legend, but the story never springs to life. The skimpy map and black-and-white illustrations (some of which display an alarmingly inaccurate sense of perspective) are lamentable. If the aim is to interest children in history, better to point them instead to Scott O'Dell's vivid and moving Streams to the River, River to the Sea: A Novel of Sacajawea . Ages 8-11. (Sept.)
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-- Sacajawea has long been seen as a figure of courage, daring, and adventure to youngsters. In this biography--by far the most thorough and straightforward available--Rowland covers what little is known, or can be surmised, about Sacajawea's childhood and discusses her role in the famous expedition of 1804-05. Rowland avoids sentimentality and fictionalizing, and, aside from a few minor errors, is accurate in her account. Unfortunately, her writing lacks the spark and insight that bring characters to life; her book is adequate but unexceptional, and students are not likely to turn to it for leisure reading. There is no index or bibliography; the black-and-white illustrations scattered throughout are roughly drawn; and the map lacks state boundaries, making it difficult for readers to place the expedition in context. O'Dell's historical novel Streams to the River, River to the Sea (Houghton, 1986), for the same age group, is more interesting but is highly romanticized and often misleading. --Ann W. Moore, formerly at Lane Road Library, Columbus, OH
Kathleen Odean
This is fine historical novel alternatives between the voices of Sacajawea, the young Shoshone woman who helped guide the Lewis and Clark expedition and William Clark, one of the expedition leaders.
Book Magazine

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780833599650
Publisher:
Turtleback Books: A Division of Sanval
Publication date:
08/28/1989
Pages:
91
Product dimensions:
6.36(w) x 9.32(h) x 0.49(d)
Age Range:
8 - 11 Years

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