The story of the earth's atmosphere by Douglas Archibald | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
The Story Of The Earth's Atmosphere

The Story Of The Earth's Atmosphere

by Douglas Archibald
     
 

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Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Overview

Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781446075883
Publisher:
Read Books Design
Publication date:
07/15/2011
Pages:
194
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.45(d)

Read an Excerpt


These same minute dust particles, by their scattering action on the small waves of light at the violet end of the spectrum, have been shewn by Lord Rayleigh to be the cause of blue sky, while its gradual deepening into black as we ascend is readily seen to be the result of their gradual diminution in number. CHAPTER III. THE PRESSURE AND WEIGHT OF THE ATMOSPHERE. One of the first facts which is brought to our notice in these days when those physical laws, which the ancient philosophers discovered towards the end of their lives, are taught us from childhood, is that the air has weight and exerts pressure. The story of the discovery of the barometer or weight measurer is a romantic chapter in the history of science. About 1643, some Florentine gardeners found that they were unable to pump up water higher than thirty-three feet. Up to thdt time it was an accepted dogma that" Nature abhorred a vacuum," and this apparent lapse on the part of Nature was looked upon as inexplicable. When Galileo was informed of it, soured as he was with a world which had rejected some of his greatest discoveries, he cynically remarked that Nature evidently abhorred a vacuum up to thirty-three feet. His pupil, Torricelli, however, was not content with this perfunctory explanation, and applyinghis genius to the question, conjectured that the column of thirty-three feet of water exactly balanced a similar column of air stretching to the limits of the atmosphere. Remembering that mercury was about thirteen times as heavy as water, he inferred that if this were true, a mercury pump would only raise mercury to a height of about 30 inches. He thereupon filled a long glass tube with mercury, and having stopped upone end, placed his thumb over the open end and inverted it over a basin of the liquid ...

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