The Story of the Other Wise Man

The Story of the Other Wise Man

3.7 15
by Henry Van Dyke, J. R. Flanagan
     
 

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"I do not know where this little story came from—out of the air, perhaps. One thing is certain, it is not written in any other book, nor is it to be found among the ancient lore of the East. And yet I have never felt as if it were my own. It was a gift, and it seemed to me as if I knew the Giver."
—Henry Van Dyke

Long, long ago, a wise man

Overview

"I do not know where this little story came from—out of the air, perhaps. One thing is certain, it is not written in any other book, nor is it to be found among the ancient lore of the East. And yet I have never felt as if it were my own. It was a gift, and it seemed to me as if I knew the Giver."
—Henry Van Dyke

Long, long ago, a wise man named Artaban, a priest of the Magi, discerned from heavenly signs that the time was at hand for the fulfillment of an ancient prophecy—the birth among the Hebrews of a holy Prince and Deliverer of Man. Hastening to join three fellow Magi for the long journey into Judaea, he paused to help a dying man and was left behind. And so Artaban began his pilgrimage alone, striking out not toward the realization of his life's deepest longing, as he hoped, but only toward misfortune and suffering. Or so he believed until one blessed, radiant moment.

With an introduction by Leo Buscaglia

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780517122778
Publisher:
Random House Value Publishing, Incorporated
Publication date:
09/25/1995
Pages:
96
Product dimensions:
7.36(w) x 9.31(h) x 0.48(d)

Meet the Author

Henry Van Dyke was a preacher, university professor, diplomat, poet, translator, and author of many inspirational writings.  His most famous work is The Story of the Other Wise Man, one of the best loved and most inspiring of all Christmas classics, celebrating its triumphant centennial in 1996.

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The Story of the Other Wise Man 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
HomeSchoolBookReview More than 1 year ago
Nearly everyone is familiar with the story of the Wise Men who brought gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh to the baby Jesus. Tradition numbers them at three and names them Caspar, Melchoir, and Balthazar. But did you know the story of “The Other Wise Man”? Artaban, a leader of the Persian Magi, learns from heavenly signs that the time is at hand for the fulfillment of an ancient prophecy about the birth among the Hebrews of a holy Prince and Deliverer of Man. Hastening to join three fellow Magi for the long journey into Judaea, he pauses to help a dying man in Babylon and is left behind. And so Artaban begins his pilgrimage alone. Artaban then makes it to Bethlehem but finds that he has just missed both his friends and the young child. But before he can hope to catch up with Joseph, Mary, and their child on their way to Egypt, he stops to assist a mother whose child is in danger of being killed by Herod’s troops. After searching for His quest in Egypt and not finding it, he then travels from place to place, visiting the oppressed, feeding the hungry, clothing the naked, tending the sick, and comforting the captive. After 33 years, he ends up, an aged, white-haired man, in Jerusalem on the day of the Passover. Just as he thinks that he might find the object of his search who is being led away to be crucified, he is beseeched by a young girl from his native Parthia who is being sold into slavery to pay her father’s debts. Will he ever see the King for whom He has looked these many years? Henry Jackson van Dyke (1852–1933) was a Presbyterian minister, professor at Princeton University, President Woodrow Wilson’s ambassador to the Netherlands and Luxembourg, and a noted author who wrote the hymn, “Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee” set to the “Ode to Joy” theme from Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony. Van Dyke said, "I do not know where this little story came from--out of the air, perhaps. One thing is certain, it is not written in any other book, nor is it to be found among the ancient lore of the East. And yet I have never felt as if it were my own. It was a gift, and it seemed to me as if I knew the Giver." He first read The Story of The Other Wise Man aloud to his New York congregation after writing it and then had it published in written form. It is, in essence, a parable that shows what seeking for Jesus in life is really all about. We did it as a family read aloud, and everyone was moved by the story.
herbnrenewal More than 1 year ago
There are so many layers but what I got out of this short story is WE are the treasure and gift we can give to the Savior. Who we become is more important than what we have. I like that.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This excellent story reads between the lines in the traditional Christmas genres. It displays the true meaning of Christmas, and shows how God rewards people who love and care. This Christmas story is a classic in my house and will be for generations to come.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is a must read simply because it is beautifully written. They style of van Dyke abounds with unique and colorful metophors and similies. This is one of those rare books were both them narrative and the dialogue are rendered in fluid, eloquent verse. Yet the style is not so osentatiously poetical that the common reader cannot understand it. Some passages I re-read several times because the imagery was so vivid and picturesque. The book is worth reading just for that. The problem with this book lies in the fact that it is very, almost tragically too short. It only took me a little over an hour to read, though a faster reader will finish it in less time. I have noticed that a lot of authors excelling in crafting splinded visual images in a readers mind, often fail in telling the story. It's not so much that the theme of the story is pathetic, but it is too laconic to realize its full potential. The character of Artaban undergoes many hardships in the course of the story, but it is too underdeveloped for the reader to feel for him. The plot too is lacking in development, and moves far too quickly. All in all, it is a like a piece of delicious dessert that is far too small to be truely enjoyed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A classic story, theoloically sound, one for all times
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You might as well pay for another version - this one comes up as half gibberish on the NOOK. Unreadable!
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