Story Time for Little Porcupine

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Parents and children both cherish the quiet moments of story time and this storybook, featuring myth stories encompassed within the main story, is ideal for settling the little ones down to dream. As Little Porcupine and his Papa prepare for story time, Little Porcupine peppers his father with opinions on what stories should be told. Papa does his best to accommodate the requests with the creative mythlike stories "How the Big Porcupine Got His Spines" and "How the big Porcupine Fooled the Moon". Little Porcupine also entertains Papa with a very clever story of his own. Before each story, the porcupines share an endearing dialogue, answering and asking questions that any parent will relate to. The earthy calmness of Rogers' watercolor illustrations creates a beautiful and soothing atmosphere just right for drifting off to sleep. 2000, Cavendish, Ages 3 to 7, $15.95. Reviewer: Trina Heidt
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-A cozy bedtime choice. As they get ready for bed, Papa Porcupine tells Little Porcupine three pourquoi tales: how the Big Porcupine in the Sky (the sun) got his rays, how the first sunset was created, and how the stars came to be. The touching family interactions, the porcupine folktales, and the warm and inviting watercolor paintings make this book appealing. The animals are wonderfully personified, and gingham-inspired frames around the stories within a story add interest.-Kate McLean, Dekalb County Public Library, Tucker, GA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
From The Critics
It's time for bed, but first—a story! Little Porcupine requests a story about the Big Porcupine in the Sky. "Well, grab your toes, 'cause here goes!" says Papa. Although Big Porcupine was the King of the Daytime Sky, he had no spines. One day the clouds decided to cover up Big Porcupine so that they would become the Kings of the Sky. When the clouds all came together, lightning zigzagged across the sky. Big Porcupine worried that the lightning would hurt the little porcupines on earth so he reached out and caught every bolt that flashed. When his paws were full he stuck the lightning bolts into his head, back, and tail. Today, we call his spines the sunrays.Little Porcupine then wants to tell Papa the story about Big Porcupine's Picnic. "Grab your toes, Papa, 'cause here goes!" Big Porcupine in the Sky wanted to tell all the little porcupines on earth a story but realized that no one would hear him. What could he do? He decided to give them a picnic. He placed grapes, bananas, and raspberries in a basket and hurried over to some blue sky in the West. He squished the raspberries all over his head and squeezed the grapes through a handkerchief to wipe pure juice across the sky. Next, he lined up the yellow banana peels under a green picnic blanket. All the little creatures cheered when they saw the first sunset. Little Porcupine promises to close his eyes and pretend to sleep after one more story about the Big Porcupine and the Moon. "Keep them closed and grab your toes," says Papa. Moon was jealous of the Big Porcupine in the Sky because Big Porcupine was brighter, warmer, bigger, and shone all day. Moon pulled his night cloak over Big Porcupine, but the sunrays shot out and poked holes in the cloak. The holes are the stars in the night sky that watch over all the little porcupines of the world. Slate, a prize-winning author, has written a bedtime story that gives explanations to some of the many questions that young children ask. The stories evoke pleasant thoughts and give children something to think about as they fall asleep. Rogers has chosen colors that are warm and soothing. The bedtime story pages have borders around them that have to do with the particular happenings of that story. By contrast, the soft-colored drawings of Papa and Little Porcupine are on a white background. Rogers has provided a story within a story through the use of color.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780761450733
  • Publisher: Cavendish Square Publishing
  • Publication date: 9/1/1900
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 2 - 6 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.89 (w) x 9.56 (h) x 0.41 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 7, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Great bedtime stories

    Overview: It's time for bed & Little Porcupine wants Papa Porcupine to tell him some stories. There are 3 stories in this book - "How the Big Porcupine Got His Spines," "Big Porcupine's Picnic," and "How the Big Porcupine Fooled the Moon." Papa Porcupine tells the first & third stories to Little Porcupine & Little Porcupine tells the second one to Papa.

    Mommy Bookworm's Thoughts: This book is ADORABLE!!! I love all kinds of animals & the illustrations in this book are amazing to me. They make me want to just take the porcupines right out of the book & cuddle with them - except for when it mentions how they give a "big scratchy hug" or a "big ouchy hug." The "Big Porcupine" is the sun & although the stories are obviously fiction, I love them because the porcupines are trying to relate nature to themselves. I love all the stories, but particularly like the second one because Little Porcupine talks about how he wasn't invited to a party, but how he would invite everyone to a party if he has one, and how Big Porcupine includes everyone in his parties (which are sunsets). I think it has a great message of including everyone. All the stories have great messages about nature.

    Dahlia Bookworm's Thoughts (11 years old): I thought the book was cute because the porcupine wanted to have story time before bed. I like the part where the little porcupine told the story of the sun's picnic. I liked the pictures & colors. I can read it by myself easily & would recommend it to kids my age and a little younger, but not too much younger.

    Daisy Bookworm's Thoughts (7 years old): I like the second and third stories because they were funny. I really like the pictures and colors. I would need some help reading it. I think other kids my age would like it. I also think the author wrote the book just for fun. I really like the book because it is interesting.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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