Storytelling Encyclopedia: Historical, Cultural, and Multiethnic Approaches to Oral Traditions Around the World

Overview

This is the first definitive reference work to address the substantive elements of oral storytelling, a form of communication that dates back to the dawn of humanity. It is an A to Z collection of over 700 entries covering such major storytelling elements as motifs, character types, tale types, place names, and creation mythologies and storytelling techniques of cultures around the world. Examples of subjects covered are the contributions of pioneering folklorists and mythologists such as: Franz Boas, Stith ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (7) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $68.40   
  • Used (4) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

This is the first definitive reference work to address the substantive elements of oral storytelling, a form of communication that dates back to the dawn of humanity. It is an A to Z collection of over 700 entries covering such major storytelling elements as motifs, character types, tale types, place names, and creation mythologies and storytelling techniques of cultures around the world. Examples of subjects covered are the contributions of pioneering folklorists and mythologists such as: Franz Boas, Stith Thompson, and Joseph Campbell; descriptions of such well-known Western tales as Cinderella, the Greek myth of Persephone and Demeter, and the story of Exodus; as well as tales from Native American, African, and Asian cultures, including Indra and the Ants, tales of Anansi, the spider-trickster of the Ashanti, and the Cherokee Bear-man.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Oryx, a well-known publisher in the storytelling field, presents an encyclopedia that includes entries on characters from both mythology and folklore as well as authors, storytellers, scholars, tale types, terminology, cultural traditions, and more. A selected bibliography is included, and most entries are followed by references to further reading. Cross references are included within the text. Major contributors are listed, but individual articles are not signed. This is unfortunate, as some of the entries are unbalanced and treatment is somewhat uneven, and perhaps knowing the individual author's credentials would help explain the biases. For example, the entry on "Afterlife" covers the traditions of nine cultures in 20 lines and then uses 29 more lines on one Nez Perce Coyote tale. The entry on "Giants" uses approximately 19.5 inches of space but the entry on the concept of "God" only nine inches. The well-known Mexican tale of the wailing woman, La Llorana, is mentioned under "Mexican storytelling" but has no entry of its own, while Pele, Percival, Persephone, and many other similar characters do. This encyclopedia is similar in structure to Jan Brunvand's American Folklore: An Encyclopedia Garland, 1996. Although it is broader in scope than Brunvand's work, reaching beyond the United States to touch on a variety of cultural traditions, it is also less sure in its focus. Nonetheless, it includes a great deal of material not covered in any other reference source, making it a worthwhile purchase for public and academic libraries where usage justifies.Katherine K. Koenig, Ellis Sch., Greensburg, Pa.
School Library Journal
This ambitious undertaking contains more than 700 entries on diverse aspects of the oral tradition. "There are doubtless entries that should have been included that have not been," Leeming writes in the preface, "and there are entries that some might find inappropriate or superfluous." In fact, the problem is neither the omission or inclusion of any particular topic, but rather a certain unevenness in the treatment of the material presented. When dealing with the ancient world, for instance, the work is sure and scholarly: this is an excellent reference for creation myths from almost anywhere. It also offers biographical information on anthropologists and folklorists not generally included in most sources. The problems arise in the book's treatment of more recent influences on storytelling, and in the way it makes connections between the ancient and modern worlds. Both Hans Christian Andersen and Carl Sandburg, for instance, are given short shrift in very brief entries. Elsewhere, the book simplistically presents the Hindu god Ganesa as a forerunner of Dumbo the Elephant and sees Gilgamesh's friendship with Enkidu reincarnated in Lethal Weapon. Indeed, when historical connections are made to the tales currently available to children, the focus is almost always on the Disney version instead of the considerable body of authentic folklore currently in print. Though Leeming's book contains some interesting material, Norma Livo's Storytelling Folklore Sourcebook Libraries Unlimited, 1991 and Anne Pellowski's The World of Storytelling Bowker, 1977 may be of more practical use to both students and storytellers.Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ
Booknews
By way of introduction, four substantial essays discuss elements and techniques of storytelling and its history in modern America. Then some 700 entries identify and describe tales, characters, motives, and techniques from around the world including the Americas, Africa, Australia, Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. The articles average about half a page and include suggested further reading, recommended editions, and good cross-referencing. Readers are assumed to be practitioners rather than academic folklorists. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781573560252
  • Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/23/1997
  • Pages: 556
  • Sales rank: 1,376,152
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 10.28 (h) x 1.53 (d)

Meet the Author

DAVID ADAMS LEEMING is professor emeritus of English and comparative literature at the University of Connecticut, Storrs, where he has taught since 1969.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

CONTRIBUTORS vii

PREFACE ix

PART ONE

Once Upon a Time David Adams Leeming 3

Building Bridges with Stories Melissa Heckler and Carol Birch 8

American Oral Tradition Emory Elliott and Jackie Stallcup 16

The Utopian Tendency of Storytelling: Turning the World Upside Down Jack Zipes 27

PART TWO

A-Z Entries 35

Selected Bibliography 509

Index 519

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)