Straight Talk Leadership Seminars: 16 Tips to Become a Best-in-Class Mentor

Straight Talk Leadership Seminars: 16 Tips to Become a Best-in-Class Mentor

by Lonnie Pacelli
     
 

As a young consultant I really thought I had it all together. I was getting great ratings, great raises, and wonderful accolades from clients. Because I (in my own mind) thought I was such hot stuff, I was not active in seeking out advice from more experienced colleagues. After all, what could they teach me?

As I matured from an inexperienced hot-shot to an

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Overview

As a young consultant I really thought I had it all together. I was getting great ratings, great raises, and wonderful accolades from clients. Because I (in my own mind) thought I was such hot stuff, I was not active in seeking out advice from more experienced colleagues. After all, what could they teach me?

As I matured from an inexperienced hot-shot to an experienced manager, I developed a much stronger appreciation for the wisdom my more experienced colleagues could impart. This appreciation didn’t happen naturally; I had to get my butt chewed off a bunch of times to realize that a wiser and more experienced colleague could help me get through the tough times and learn from my mistakes. I also needed a wiser colleague to hold a mirror up to my face to help me see my weaknesses. I needed (and still need) a mentor to help me be more effective as a leader.

Whether for personal or professional reasons, having a mentor to turn to for advice and counsel is a very effective means of transforming knowledge into wisdom. Before I go any further, let’s get a definition of wisdom in place:

Knowledge + Experience = Wisdom

In a mentoring relationship, a mentoree, or person being mentored, typically brings a lot of knowledge to the table. The mentoree has learned the fundamentals of how to do his or her job and can probably do the basics well. What the mentor, or the person doing the mentoring, provides to the mentoree is experience. The mentor provides perspective on what to do when things aren’t optimal or when difficult situations crop up. When the experience from the mentor is transferred to the mentoree, it accelerates the wisdom building process because the mentoree now doesn’t have to learn solely through his or her own mistakes. The mentoree is able to learn from a combination of his or her own mistakes and the mentor’s advice about what to do or not do.

For mentoring relationships to work well, I’ve found several items to be very important:

The mentor should not have a direct reporting relationship with the mentoree. The mentoree can feel free to speak about issues which may be plaguing him or her without fear of retribution from a boss.

The mentor needs to want to be a mentor. Mentoring is an incredibly important responsibility that is likely over and above any direct responsibilities the leader already has. If the leader doesn’t want to be a mentor, he or she is going to view the time spent mentoring as a nuisance.

The mentoree needs to want to have a mentor. Forcing someone to have a mentor is like trying to force a toddler to eat peas: the toddler may do it but he or she isn’t going to like it. The mentoree needs to see the value in the relationship and must have a desire to benefit from the relationship; otherwise the mentor will just go through the motions until his or her plate is clean.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940045246989
Publisher:
Pacelli Publishing
Publication date:
08/18/2013
Series:
Straight Talk Leadership Seminars
Sold by:
Smashwords
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
77 KB
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Lonnie Pacelli is an internationally recognized author and president of Leading on the Edge International. Lonnie has over 25 years of leadership experience as an executive, project manager, developer, tester, analyst, trainer, consultant, and business owner. During his 11 years at Accenture he gained leadership expertise consulting with many Fortune 500 companies including Motorola, Hughes Electronics, and Northrop-Grumman. Throughout his nine years at Microsoft he built his leadership expertise through development of some of Microsoft’s internal systems and led their Corporate Procurement group, managed their Corporate Planning group, and led company-wide initiatives on Continuous Fiscal Improvement and Training Process Optimization. At Leading on the Edge International Lonnie consults with companies such as Microsoft, AT&T, Corning, and Key Bank on leadership, project management, executive coaching, and business strategy development and implementation. He is an engaging and entertaining keynote speaker and consistently receives rave reviews from his audiences. His practical, no-nonsense, experience-based approach to solving tough problems has helped leaders, project managers and teams consistently deliver results.

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